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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2007

Mary T. Westbrook, Jeffrey Braithwaite, Joanne F. Travaglia, Debbi Long, Christine Jorm and Rick A. Iedema

Patient safety has been addressed since 2002 in the health system of New South Wales, Australia via a Safety Improvement Programme (SIP), which took a system‐wide…

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Abstract

Purpose

Patient safety has been addressed since 2002 in the health system of New South Wales, Australia via a Safety Improvement Programme (SIP), which took a system‐wide approach. The programme involved two‐day courses to educate healthcare professionals to monitor and report incidents and analyse adverse events by conducting root cause analysis (RCA). This paper aims to predict that all professions would favour SIP but that their work and educational histories would result in doctors holding the least and nurses the most positive attitudes. Alternative hypotheses were that doctors' relative power and other professions' team‐working skills would advantage the respective groups when conducting RCAs.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses to a 2005 follow‐up questionnaire survey of doctors (n=53), nurses (209) and allied health staff (59), who had participated in SIP courses, were analysed to compare: their attitudes toward the course; safety skills acquired and applied; perceived benefits of SIP and RCAs; and their experiences conducting RCAs.

Findings

Significant differences existed between professions' responses with nurses being the most and doctors the least affirming. Allied health responses resembled those of nurses more than those of doctors. The professions' experiences conducting RCAs (number conducted, leadership, barriers encountered, findings implemented) were similar.

Research limitations/implications

Observational studies are needed to determine possible professional differences in the conduct of RCAs and any ensuing culture change that this may be eliciting.

Practical implications

There is strong professional support for SIPs but less endorsement from doctors, who tend not to prefer the knowledge content and multidisciplinary teaching environment considered optimal for safety improvement education. This is a dilemma that needs to be addressed.

Originality/value

Few longer‐term SIPs' assessments have been realised and the differences between professional groups have not been well quantified. As a result of this paper, benefits of and barriers to conducting RCAs are now more clearly understood.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2007

Jeffrey Braithwaite, Mary T. Westbrook, Joanne F. Travaglia, Rick Iedema, Nadine A. Mallock, Debbi Long, Peter Nugus, Rowena Forsyth, Christine Jorm and Marjorie Pawsey

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of a health system‐wide safety improvement program (SIP) three to four years after initial implementation.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of a health system‐wide safety improvement program (SIP) three to four years after initial implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs multi‐methods studies involving questionnaire surveys, focus groups, in‐depth interviews, observational work, ethnographic studies, documentary analysis and literature reviews with regard to the state of New South Wales, Australia, where 90,000 health professionals, under the auspices of the Health Department, provide healthcare to a seven‐million population. After enrolling many participants from various groups, the measurements included: numbers of staff trained and training quality; support for SIP; clinicians' reports of safety skills acquired, work practices changed and barriers to progress; RCAs undertaken; observation of functioning of teams; committees initiated and staff appointed to deal with adverse events; documentation and computer records of reports; and peak‐level responses to adverse events.

Findings

A cohort of 4 per cent of the state's health professionals has been trained and now applies safety skills and conducts RCAs. These and other senior professionals strongly support SIP, though many think further culture change is required if its benefits are to be more fully achieved and sustained. Improved information‐handling systems have been adopted. Systems for reporting adverse incidents and conducting RCAs have been instituted, which are co‐ordinated by NSW Health. When the appropriate structures, educational activities and systems are made available in the form of an SIP, measurable systems change might be introduced, as suggested by observations of the attitudes and behaviours of health practitioners and the increased reporting of, and action about, adverse events.

Originality/value

Few studies into health systems change employ wide‐ranging research methods and metrics. This study helps to fill this gap.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2022

Krisda Matmuang Cripe and Cheryl Burleigh

The purpose of this paper was to discover the best practices used by information technology (IT) project managers to determine what leadership skills, behaviors…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to discover the best practices used by information technology (IT) project managers to determine what leadership skills, behaviors, communication tools and techniques are needed to lead and communicate effectively with virtual IT project teams.

Design/methodology/approach

In this qualitative case study, data was gathered by semistructured interviews from ten successful IT project managers from Northern California who had more than ten years of experience managing virtual teams (VTs) with growing and profitable IT companies in Silicon Valley, California.

Findings

IT project managers and leaders may consider building personal relationships with team members at the beginning of each project to foster a sense of camaraderie and common ground for the successful outcome and desired results. Maintaining cohesive team relationships to gain their trust and confidence may require additional coaching, mentoring, collaborating, recognizing their accomplishments, providing technical training, and understanding different cultures and local laws that relate to VTs to manage projects successfully to move projects forward in sustaining business, and assure customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

Findings from this study may assist IT project managers and leaders in building trust and rapport, increasing efficiency and developing effective lines of communication within their virtual IT teams.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Teresa E. Dana

Debbi Fields has been baking cookies for public consumption since August 1977, when she opened the first Mrs Fields’ Chocolate Chippery in Palo Alto, California. After…

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Abstract

Debbi Fields has been baking cookies for public consumption since August 1977, when she opened the first Mrs Fields’ Chocolate Chippery in Palo Alto, California. After being coerced by her husband and her employees, she decided to follow their advice and open a second store in order to serve up more soft and chewy cookies. By 1981, there were 14 stores in the USA and the following year, Mrs Fields expanded internationally to Japan, Hong Kong and Australia. Ms Lek Oon Goh is the woman entrepreneur who has the franchise licence for the Malaysian and Singaporean markets. In September 1995, she opened her first outlet in Singapore and by 1997 she had opened three more shops in the city republic. Since then, Ms Goh has begun the search for optimal locations in Malaysia where the next Mrs Fields’ Cookies will be opening soon.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Debby A. Lindsey

This study establishes a baseline for the mortgage industry's beliefs and attitudes about race, culture, and discrimination in mortgage banking and determines if these…

Abstract

This study establishes a baseline for the mortgage industry's beliefs and attitudes about race, culture, and discrimination in mortgage banking and determines if these attitudes vary by race. Through survey research, the data reveals that race matters in the lending arena.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 19 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Abstract

Details

Leadership and Power in International Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-116-0

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2022

Atik Aprianingsih, Ira Fachira, Margareth Setiawan, Teresia Debby, Nia Desiana and Shafa Amira Nurryda Lathifan

This study aims to explore the relationships between particular personal values (environmental, hedonic and utilitarian) and the intention to purchase slow fashion through…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the relationships between particular personal values (environmental, hedonic and utilitarian) and the intention to purchase slow fashion through the mechanism of attitude toward slow fashion in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

This quantitative study uses an online questionnaire to obtain survey data from 429 respondents in cities in Indonesia. The respondents were mostly aged between 18 and 45 years, with the majority between 18 and 22 years (63.40 per cent). Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling are used to test and validate the proposed model's scale validity and relationship.

Findings

Environmental, utilitarian and hedonic values are positively related to attitudes toward slow-fashion products. Further, attitudes toward slow-fashion products positively influence purchase intention.

Practical implications

The study suggests marketing strategies to stimulate the intention to purchase slow fashion through advertising that emphasizes utilitarian, environmental and hedonic values, such as the pleasure in using slow-fashion products.

Originality/value

This study is the first to investigate the relationship of environmental and motivational values (hedonic and utilitarian) to the intention to purchase slow-fashion products. The findings contribute to the theoretical and practical understandings of slow fashion by identifying pre-positioned values that trigger positive attitudes toward slow-fashion products, thereby increasing purchase intention.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 November 2022

Debby Willar, Bambang Trigunarsyah, Anak Agung Diah Parami Dewi and Febriane Makalew

There are various methods to assess the failure of a road construction project that does not meet quality and performance standards. This study aims to evaluate the…

Abstract

Purpose

There are various methods to assess the failure of a road construction project that does not meet quality and performance standards. This study aims to evaluate the factors affecting the quality management of road construction projects in Indonesia by identifying the critical challenges in implementing quality management processes and examining the countermeasures to address these problems.

Design/methodology/approach

In this research, the quality management processes in Indonesian road construction projects are evaluated using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach. Quantitative data obtained from two rounds of Delphi questionnaire surveys as the primary data source, and focus group interviews as the qualitative data are used to achieve the aims of this study.

Findings

It is found that from as early as in the preconstruction stage of a project, the availability of quality standards and documentation is problematic when implementing quality management processes. The critical factor of the quality control activities of a project and the quality management roles and responsibilities of the stakeholders during road construction is the project team. This constraint deals with the interaction of the competency, commitment, and mutual cooperation among the main stakeholders to ensure that quality management processes are implemented. This implementation is a part of controlling the road pavement materials, supervising the project activities according to a specified standard, and reporting the project performance. The findings of this study add parameters relating to quality management and quality processes in a road construction project area.

Originality/value

This study is the first to evaluate the quality management processes in the construction of Indonesian road projects. The investigation identifies and evaluates the causes of the persistence of poor road quality. All revealed constraints are substantial factors that hinder the implementation of quality management processes when delivering quality road products. This study addresses the key influencing factors and scenarios related to quality management during road construction projects in Indonesia and other developing countries as practical examples and provides case-based insights for construction practitioners and civil engineering academics in developed countries.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Ruth Townsley, Debby Watson and David Abbott

Recent government policies in relation to children stress the importance of service integration and partnership working, with particular emphasis on combating social…

Abstract

Recent government policies in relation to children stress the importance of service integration and partnership working, with particular emphasis on combating social exclusion. With reference to findings from a three‐year empirical study, this article examines some key elements of the process of multi‐agency working in services for disabled children with complex health care needs. It highlights some of the barriers to effective partnerships and lists some pointers for policy and practice.

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2022

Dirk Franco, Janaina Macke, Debby Cotton, Arminda Paço, Jean-Pierre Segers and Laura Franco

This study aims to explore students’ sustainability attitudes and behavioural intentions and their relation to energy use, to promote energy saving and decarbonisation in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore students’ sustainability attitudes and behavioural intentions and their relation to energy use, to promote energy saving and decarbonisation in higher education settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a validated energy literacy survey to assess undergraduate students’ attitudes and behavioural intentions towards energy saving in two countries (Brazil and Belgium). The questionnaire, administered online, comprised 23 Likert scale questions and three questions eliciting socio-demographic information. Results were analysed using a linear regression model and compared with previous research using the same energy literacy instrument.

Findings

The research identified three dimensions of sustainable attitudes: citizens’ role, scientists’ role and government’s role, explaining 65.5% of respondents’ energy-related attitudes. Three dimensions of sustainable behaviours were identified, explaining 64.5% of energy-related behavioural intentions: consumption of eco-friendly products, financially driven behaviours and household energy saving. The linear regression model identified scientists’ role, consumption of eco-friendly products and financially driven behaviour as the key predictors of student energy use. Differences between the two contexts also emerged.

Research limitations/implications

Individual action to improve energy saving is necessary, but not sufficient for decarbonisation. However, student attitudes and behavioural intentions towards energy are an important element of campus decarbonisation: these “micro” experiments can become a “network” searching for synergies at the campus level (in collaboration with the neighbourhood) and act as a catalyst towards a more profound carbon-free society. Limitations of the research include the use of a survey to ascertain estimates of energy use; however, the study offers a model for further research and a mode of analysis that would be useful to other researchers.

Practical implications

This research enables universities to better understand the drivers and barriers to student energy-saving activities and thereby promote decarbonisation on campus. This is a crucial underpinning in the creation of sustainable universities, linking education and campus developments. This survey was one of the catalysts to set up a total new maintenance energy performance contract (MEPC) at one of the authors’ institutions, where energy efficiency was realised alongside other sustainability aspects, such as water saving, circular renovation and waste reduction.

Social implications

This research illustrates the challenges and opportunities of working with key stakeholders in university settings for university-based decarbonisation efforts. Intensive involvement of students and teachers in the new MEPC offers an example of co-creation with building “users” – which may have implications for other university building developments. Increasingly, universities need to consider the need for a new business model in which shared and multiple value creation is a key feature. Treating societal challenges as business opportunities is an important new dimension of corporate strategy and a powerful path to social progress, which higher education institutions should not overlook.

Originality/value

Student attitudes and behavioural intentions towards energy are an important element of campus decarbonisation and can act as a catalyst towards a carbon-free society. Although energy literacy research has been undertaken in the USA and UK, this research is the first of its kind for Belgium and Brazil, and the mode of analysis – using a linear regression model – differs from the earlier work, offering a novel methodological approach.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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