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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Debasis Pradhan, Vikram Kapoor and Tapas Ranjan Moharana

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of user gender, celebrity gender, and celebrity-user gender congruity on celebrity personality-user personality (CP-UP…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of user gender, celebrity gender, and celebrity-user gender congruity on celebrity personality-user personality (CP-UP) congruity, and consequently, brand purchase intention (BPI). Additionally, it delves into the mediating roles of CP-UP congruity and brand personality-celebrity personality (BP-CP) congruity.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research entailing a sample of 709 adult consumers was used to test the framed hypotheses by means of a structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results indicate that while celebrity and user gender have a significant positive effect on CP-UP congruity, celebrity-user gender congruity has a negative effect. The study shows a partial mediation of CP-UP congruity in the relationship between gender congruity and BP-CP congruity. Furthermore, BP-CP congruity is shown to have a full mediation effect on the relationship between CP-UP congruity and BPI.

Research limitations/implications

Consistency of the results of this study may be corroborated by employing other methods to estimate congruity scores. Also, the results of the present study may not be generalisable across different product classes with varied consumer involvement.

Practical implications

The findings have major implications for practitioners in understanding the significance of BP-CP congruity among celebrity-user-brand in the formation of purchasing intentions. The results of the study suggest a better CP-UP congruity when the gender of the celebrity is opposite to the gender of the user. This result questions the generalisability of the similarity theory that exhorts a prospect’s customary identification with a spokesperson of her/his own sex and further reinforces the selectivity hypothesis that indicates different information processing of males and females while they make judgements. Therefore, it might be a good idea for advertisers targeting female audiences to employ male celebrities in certain endorsements.

Originality/value

This is the first study that tests for the mediation effect of CP-UP congruity in the relationship between gender congruity and BP-CP congruity, and that of BP-CP congruity in the relationship between CP-UP congruity and BPI.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Tapas Ranjan Moharana and Debasis Pradhan

The purpose of this paper is to compare two competing models denoting two dimensions (hedonic and utilitarian) and three dimensions (hedonic, utilitarian and social) of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare two competing models denoting two dimensions (hedonic and utilitarian) and three dimensions (hedonic, utilitarian and social) of the construct “value” and investigates their relative influence on satisfaction, future patronage intention (FPI) and word-of-mouth (WoM) in a hypermarket context. Additionally, the study examines if these relationships are contingent upon gender and shoppers’ perception of retail crowding.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed models and the hypotheses were tested using structural equation modelling, across two cross-sectional studies (n1=268, n2=259). The multi-group analysis was used to test moderated relationships.

Findings

The study demonstrates that satisfaction mediates the impact of shopping value on FPI and WoM. The model that includes utilitarian, hedonic and social value explains higher variance in satisfaction and WoM than that is evidenced in the alternate model comprising utilitarian and hedonic values. Shoppers’ gender and perceived retail crowding moderate the influence of shopping value on satisfaction.

Practical implications

Retail managers should understand that enjoyable and social shopping experience of the consumers lead to satisfaction, which in turn plays a pivotal role in the formation of FPI and WoM. Managers discern that a moderate level of crowding is better than the extremely low or high level of density.

Originality/value

Amidst a lack of unanimity on the dimensionality of shopping value, this is one of the first studies to evaluate the two theoretical models of shopping value having two dimensions and three dimensions, respectively. An understanding of gender and retail crowding perceptions is crucial in shopping value judgments.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Sourabh Arora, Sangeeta Sahney and Debasis Pradhan

This purpose of this paper is to extend the model of goal-directed behaviour by including the potential benefits of webrooming and descriptive norms to scrutinise the…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to extend the model of goal-directed behaviour by including the potential benefits of webrooming and descriptive norms to scrutinise the consumer's rationale and intent behind webrooming.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument was employed to collect the data. A total of 324 usable responses were obtained, and the structural equation modelling technique was used for analysis.

Findings

The results of the study revealed that consumers utilised the information collected online to strike better deals offline. Also, webrooming not only stimulated smart shopper feelings amongst shoppers but also assisted them in avoiding certain risks associated with shopping online. Besides, support was also garnered for informative and possession benefits linked with webrooming. The findings demonstrated the positive impact of attitude, anticipated emotions and perceived behavioural control on desire, which in turn positively determined the intentions. Significant mediation impact was also observed between attitude and intentions via desire. However, past behaviour was evidenced to impact only intentions. Surprisingly, descriptive norms emerged as a stronger predictor of consumers' desire as opposed to subjective norms, which was found to be insignificant.

Research limitations/implications

Information search and switching costs associated with webrooming have not been considered in this study. A larger sample size would help draw broader generalisations.

Practical implications

While online retailers can utilise the findings of the study to convert webrooming shoppers into buyers, alternatively, offline stores can use the key insights to retain webroomers. Additionally, educators can use the findings of the study to teach the students about the changing retailing dynamics.

Originality/value

The present study emerges as the first one to incorporate cognitive, affective and habitual factors collectively for a better understanding of the webrooming phenomenon.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Debasis Pradhan, D. Israel and Amit Kumar Jena

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of materialism on credit card (CC) use and impulsive buying (IB) and compulsive buying (CB) behaviour. Furthermore, it…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of materialism on credit card (CC) use and impulsive buying (IB) and compulsive buying (CB) behaviour. Furthermore, it assesses whether CC use and IB behaviour mediate the relationship between materialism and CB behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from adult consumers with CCs via an online survey. For model assessment, a two-step approach was followed. First, a measurement model was created and tested using maximum likelihood estimation and validity of the study constructs was assessed. This was followed by structural equation modelling to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Materialism influences CC use and increases the propensity for IB (IB), which then precipitates CB habits. Reduction in CC use can decrease both IB and CB. Out of the six hypotheses assessed, only the one linking CC use to CB was not supported, requiring further investigation. Mediation relationships were identified, where CC use and IB act as mediators between materialism and CB.

Research limitations/implications

The paper captured responses from adult consumers of India. Hence, the findings may not be generalised across geographies and age groups. The study contributes to the debate on the impulsive–CB paradigm by showing that impulsive and CB are not distinct constructs. In fact, the former could lead to the latter.

Practical implications

CC use in itself need not necessarily lead to CB. The only way CC could cause CB is through IB. Hence, firms must promote responsible buying habits, as there has been an increase in IB, which, if not controlled, could lead to debt trap resulting from CB. The findings of this paper will help both retailers and CC institutions to better understand the spending pattern of consumers. Those will also help the policymakers to chalk out ways to the curb indiscriminate issuance of CCs without educating users.

Originality/value

The findings confirm that IB and CB exist on two ends of a continuum, and not as two distinct theoretical constructs. IB acts as a mediator between CC use and CB as well as between materialism and CB.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Raj V. Amonkar, Tuhin Sengupta and Debasis Patnaik

The learning outcomes of this paper are as follows: to understand the context of seaport logistics and supply chain design structure, to apply Monte Carlo simulation in…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes of this paper are as follows: to understand the context of seaport logistics and supply chain design structure, to apply Monte Carlo simulation in the interface of the supply chain and to analyze the Monte Carlo simulation algorithm and statistical techniques for identifying the key seaport logistics factors.

Case overview/synopsis

It was 9:00 p.m. on November 10, 2020, and Nishadh Amonkar, the CEO of OCTO supply chain management (SCM) was glued to the television watching the final cricket match of the Indian Premier League, 2020. Amonkar’s mobile phone rang and it was a call from Vinod Nair, a member Logistics Panel of Ranji Industries Federation. Nair informed Amonkar that it was related to the rejection of several export consignments of agricultural products from Ranji (in the western part of India). The rejection was due to the deterioration in the quality of the exported agricultural products during transit from Ranji to various locations in Europe.

Complexity academic level

This course is suitable at the MBA level for the following courses: Operations research (Focus/Session: Applications on Monte Carlo Simulation). SCM (Focus/Session: Global SCM, Logistics Planning, Distribution Network). Logistics management (Focus/Session: Transportation Planning). Business statistics (Focus/Session: Application of Hypothesis Testing).

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 9: Operations and logistics.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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