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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2020

Anastasia Katou, Pawan Budhwar and Mohinder D. Chand

This paper examines the relationship between timing of negotiations and idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) through the moderating effects of core self-evaluations (CSE), and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the relationship between timing of negotiations and idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) through the moderating effects of core self-evaluations (CSE), and between i-deals and employee reactions through the moderating effects of transformational leadership behaviour (TLB) in the Indian hospitality industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 275 employees working in 39 companies responded to a self-administered questionnaire. To test the research hypotheses, the methodology of structural equation models was used.

Findings

The results show that the relationship between before hiring negotiations and i-deals is stronger for those individuals who had low self-worth, due to countervailing forces created by their belief that they may not be eligible for i-deals. In contrast, the relationship between after hiring negotiations and i-deals is stronger for those who had high self-worth, due to their belief that they were entitled to i-deals. Additionally, the research highlights that the relationship between i-deals and employee reactions is stronger for those organisations, which are high on TLB.

Research limitations/implications

The data does not allow for investigating dynamic causal inferences, because they were collected using a questionnaire at a single point in time, and they were reported in retrospect, raising measurement concerns about recall bias.

Practical implications

From a managerial point of view, the findings of this study inform that in negotiating both employment conditions and work arrangements, organisations should try to achieve i-deals that are primarily flexibility focused, and that in increasing efficiency organisations should make the employees feel well supported in order to develop more confidence in deploying skills and abilities to address a more open view of their i-deals.

Originality/value

The study contributes to our understanding about the Indian hospitality industry by utilising the self-enhancement theory in examining whether individual differences moderate the relationship between the timing of negotiations and i-deals, and also by utilizing the social exchange theory to examine whether TLB moderates the relationship between i-deals and employee reactions.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 9 June 2015

Eugene B. Kogan

Economic opportunities can be nimble tools of bargaining. When denied, they can be potent tools of coercion. When showcased they can serve as powerful incentives to reach…

Abstract

Economic opportunities can be nimble tools of bargaining. When denied, they can be potent tools of coercion. When showcased they can serve as powerful incentives to reach agreement. If skillfully used to simultaneously pressure and entice, economic prospects can improve the chances of agreement within the respective negotiation teams in order for them to reach a deal across the table. This chapter critically analyzes the role of economic incentives and pressure in the nuclear negotiations between the international community and Iran. It discusses how an economic coercion and inducements campaign can help shape the internal consensus in Tehran in favor of a deal. In particular, a concerted effort to understand the opposing side’s negotiation band — the environment of “behind the table” constraints that shape the resulting bargaining strategy — can increase the chances of success in negotiation. Understanding a negotiator’s negotiation band requires a careful analysis of domestic political dynamics during the preparatory stage, active listening during negotiation, and outreach to deal advocates throughout the process to help them shift the domestic balance in favor of a deal.

Details

Reintegrating Iran with the West: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-742-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Om P. Kharbanda and Ernest A. Stallworthy

We are negotiating all the time: with customers, suppliers, tradeunions, our family ‐ indeed, all with whom we come into contact. Inbusiness, in particular, negotiation

Abstract

We are negotiating all the time: with customers, suppliers, trade unions, our family ‐ indeed, all with whom we come into contact. In business, in particular, negotiation needs management. There are said to be eight stages in negotiation: prepare, argue, signal, propose, present the package, bargain, close and agree. At the proposal stage one must be clear about what one must achieve, what one intends to achieve, and what one would like to achieve. The approach to constructive and competitive negotiation, the role of consultation, how to cope with deadlock and conflict, cross‐cultural negotiation, and the art of compromise are reviewed. The development and use of teams in negotiation is also an important factor, needing careful assessment. Negotiation will nearly always involve conflict, but steps must be taken to ensure that the participants remain on friendly terms.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

R. Dobbins and B.O. Pettman

A self‐help guide to achieving success in business. Directed more towards the self‐employed, it is relevant to other managers in organizations. Divided into clear sections…

Abstract

A self‐help guide to achieving success in business. Directed more towards the self‐employed, it is relevant to other managers in organizations. Divided into clear sections on creativity and dealing with change; importance of clear goal setting; developing winning business and marketing strategies; negotiating skills; leadership; financial skills; and time management.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Richard Dobbins and Barrie O. Pettman

Serious negotiation begins when two parties are prepared to make an exchange for mutual advantage. Company A has something to offer Company B which Company B values more…

Abstract

Serious negotiation begins when two parties are prepared to make an exchange for mutual advantage. Company A has something to offer Company B which Company B values more than Company A. Likewise, Company B has something to offer Company A which Company A values more than Company B. Reciprocation is possible. A successful negotiation can lead to the improvement in the conditions of both parties. There are usually five phases in any negotiation.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2019

Bramhani Rao and Sambashiva Rao Kunja

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between two sub-dimensions of a leader’s empathy (perspective-taking and empathic-concern) and successful…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between two sub-dimensions of a leader’s empathy (perspective-taking and empathic-concern) and successful authorization of idiosyncratic deals (developmental, location flexibility and schedule flexibility i-deals).

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling was conducted on the cross-sectional data collected from 307 managers working in software development and support companies located in major cities in India.

Findings

While empathic-concern is positively related to successful authorization of both developmental and flexibility i-deals, perspective-taking related positively to authorization of developmental i-deals and showed no significant relationship with flexibility i-deals.

Research limitations/implications

The study reiterates the importance of empathy in modern workplaces and encourages managers to be conscious of their intelligence, as well as emotions, while participating in negotiations at the workplace.

Originality/value

The paper relates i-deals to sub-dimensions of empathy which is a previously unexplored antecedent to i-deals.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

K.S. Reddy, En Xie and Yuanyuan Huang

Drawing attention to the significant number of unsuccessful (abandoned) cross-border merger and acquisition (M&A) transactions in recent years, the purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing attention to the significant number of unsuccessful (abandoned) cross-border merger and acquisition (M&A) transactions in recent years, the purpose of this paper is to analyze three litigated cross-border inbound acquisitions that associated with an emerging economy – India, such as Vodafone-Hutchison and Bharti Airtel-MTN deals in the telecommunications industry, and Vedanta-Cairn India deal in the oil and gas exploration industry. The study intends to explore how do institutional and political environments in the host country affect the completion likelihood of cross-border acquisition negotiations.

Design/methodology/approach

Nested within the interdisciplinary framework, the study adopts a legitimate method in qualitative research, that is, case study method, and performs a unit of analysis and cross-case analysis of sample cases.

Findings

The critical analysis suggests that government officials’ erratic nature and ruling political party intervention have detrimental effects on the success of Indian-hosted cross-border deals with higher bid value, listed target firm, cash payment, and stronger government control in the target industry. The findings emerge from the cross-case analysis of sample cases contribute to the Lucas paradox – why does not capital flow from rich to poor countries and interdisciplinary M&A literature on the completion likelihood of international takeovers.

Practical implications

The findings have several implications for multinational managers who typically involve in cross-border negotiations. The causes and consequences of sample cases would help develop economy firms who intend to invest in emerging economies. The study also offers some implications of M&A for telecommunications and extractive industries.

Originality/value

Although a huge amount of extant research investigates why M&A fail to create value to the shareholders during the public announcement and post-merger stages, there is a significant dearth of research on the causes and consequences of delayed or abandoned national and international deals. The paper fills this knowledge gap by discussing an in-depth cross-case analysis of Indian-hosted cross-border acquisitions.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Jean-Claude Usunier

For managers and senior executives who find themselves negotiating with international partners who differ in terms of culture, communication style, time orientation, as…

Abstract

Purpose

For managers and senior executives who find themselves negotiating with international partners who differ in terms of culture, communication style, time orientation, as well as personal and professional backgrounds, understanding the complex range of factors that impact intercultural business negotiations (ICBN) for short – is a fundamentally important skill.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on an organised review of literature on culture and business negotiations in Usunier (2019), systematically examining the interface of culture with dispositional (e.g. negotiator’s gender) and situational variable (e.g. type of contract, one-shot versus repeated deals).

Findings

Empathy is not all, culture overlaps and interacts with other key negotiation variables. The paper derives a set of guidelines for effective ICBN.

Originality/value

Many approaches to ICBN emphasise culture as a stand-alone variable. The approach helps to avoid naïve behaviour and proposes a framework for linking cultural aspects to other major situational and dispositional variables in the ICBN process.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Tuan Trong Luu and Chris Rowley

Idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) are employees’ proactive individualized negotiations with their employer for higher job autonomy corresponding to their competencies and…

Abstract

Purpose

Idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) are employees’ proactive individualized negotiations with their employer for higher job autonomy corresponding to their competencies and values. The path to i-deals in the organization can commence with value-based human resource (HR) practices. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this path from value-based HR practices to i-deals through the mediating roles of corporate social responsibility (CSR), emotional intelligence (EI) and upward influence behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypothesized model was verified through the structural equation modeling-based analysis of cross-sectional data from 362 respondents from Vietnam-based software companies.

Findings

Research findings found value-based HR practices as the starting point of the path to i-deals, in which consecutive crucial milestones are ethical CSR, EI and organizationally beneficial upward influence behaviors.

Originality/value

I-deals literature, through this empirical inquiry, is further extended by discovering the socialized driving forces, such as CSR and EI, behind individualized i-deals.

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Violet T. Ho and Amanuel G. Tekleab

The purpose of this paper is to disentangle the relationship between the request of idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) and the receipt of such deals, and investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to disentangle the relationship between the request of idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) and the receipt of such deals, and investigate the moderating roles of human capital (gender and industry experience) and social capital (leader-member exchange (LMX)) in this relationship. Attitudinal outcomes of i-deals receipt are also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 244 alumni of a Midwestern public university.

Findings

The positive relationship between i-deals request and receipt was stronger at higher than at lower levels of LMX. Receiving i-deals was related positively to job satisfaction and affective commitment, and negatively to turnover intention.

Research limitations/implications

The authors provide a nuanced perspective of i-deals by separating employees’ request from their receipt of i-deals, and identifying contingent factors that determine whether i-deal requests are successful.

Practical implications

For employees, cultivating a strong relationship with one’s supervisor can yield benefits that extend to i-deals negotiation. Providing i-deals to deserving workers can boost employees’ work attitudes.

Originality/value

Previous studies have operationalized the i-deals construct as requesting and receiving the deal, thereby excluding the possibility that employees may have requested but did not receive the i-deal. This is one of the first studies to disentangle these two concepts, thereby providing a more balanced and representative view of i-deal-making in organizations.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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