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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2019

Zahra Zamani and Dawn Gum

Corporations balancing real estate holding (CRE) costs with recruitment-retention increasingly use activity-based flexible offices (AFO) to right-size environments for a…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporations balancing real estate holding (CRE) costs with recruitment-retention increasingly use activity-based flexible offices (AFO) to right-size environments for a mobile workforce. In this layout, workers have the option to select between a mix of unassigned workstations and alternative work settings (AWS) that support autonomy and mobility. The open layout encourages visibility and access to colleagues to enhance communication and collaboration. Nevertheless, studies into the effects of AFO environment attribute effects on worker needs and work outcome are sparse. Therefore, this study aims to focus on understanding how environmental features and psychological or job needs impact observed and perceived satisfaction, communication, collaboration and perceived productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in a case organization piloting an AFO before implementation across their CRE portfolio. A mixed-methods approach was used, including systematic observations, space syntax and surveys collecting information on the observed and perceived satisfaction, communication, collaboration and productivity.

Findings

Collaboration instances were higher in AWS, especially more visible and accessible open areas, supporting higher impromptu interactions and enhanced perceptions of productivity of team members and cross-team members. Privacy requirements linked to a greater demand for enclosed AWS. Team communication satisfaction depended on how easily teams were located. Almost half of the user teams clustered within workstation zones corresponding to territoriality needs. Job autonomy satisfaction depended on the availability of preferred workstation or AWS, enabling private, uninterrupted work that enhanced perceived productivity.

Practical implications

The case study findings indicated a correlation between the AFO environment and worker needs impacting workplace satisfaction, communication, collaboration and perceived productivity.

Originality/value

The findings form this case study indicated that a fit between the AFO environment and needs impacted workplace satisfaction, communication, collaboration and perceived productivity.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate , vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1962

W.R. AITKEN

One of my favourite quotations is the opening of Robin Jenkins's novel, Happy for the Child: “Pages 256 and 257 were missing. Shocked, the boy slowly and in fear became…

Abstract

One of my favourite quotations is the opening of Robin Jenkins's novel, Happy for the Child: “Pages 256 and 257 were missing. Shocked, the boy slowly and in fear became aware that the book in his hands was merely a destructible contrivance of gum and paper, and that in spite of it round him in the little kitchen crowded the familiar baleful furniture …..” For me this captures and expresses vividly the sense of complete absorption, the feeling of total immersion one can experience in reading, and it springs to mind immediately as a first response to the Editor's suggestion that I should jot down some notes and comments on “books that have particularly attracted me” in my reading over the years.

Details

Library Review, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 24 November 2019

Maja Krtalić and Ivana Hebrang Grgić

The purpose of this paper was to explore how small immigrant communities in host countries collect, disseminate and present information about their home country and their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to explore how small immigrant communities in host countries collect, disseminate and present information about their home country and their community, and the role of formal societies and clubs in it.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the results of a case study of the Croatian community in New Zealand. To illustrate how cultural and technological changes affected information dissemination and communication within the community, the case study presents both historical and current situations. Methods used in this case study included a content analysis of historical newspapers published in New Zealand by the Croatian community, content analysis of current webpages and social networking sites, and interviews with participants who have management roles in Croatian societies and communities in New Zealand. Data were collected from December 2018 to February 2019.

Findings

Formally established clubs and societies, but also informal groups of immigrants and their descendants can play a significant role in providing their members with information about the culture, social life and events of the home country. They also play a significant role in preserving part of the history and heritage which is relevant, not only for a specific community but also for the history and culture of a home country.

Originality/value

The methodology used in the research is based on data from community archives and can be used for studying other small immigrant communities in New Zealand or abroad. The case study presented in the paper illustrates how the information environment of small immigrant communities develops and changes over the years under the influence of diverse political, social and technological changes.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 68 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Jan Keane

Abstract

Details

National Identity and Education in Early Twentieth Century Australia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-246-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Harry Ardeshir

Unwittingly man has used enzymes in the preparation of food and drink since the dawn of civilisation. Now we are aware of the enormous potential of enzymes in making the…

Abstract

Unwittingly man has used enzymes in the preparation of food and drink since the dawn of civilisation. Now we are aware of the enormous potential of enzymes in making the sophisticated food products to meet the demands of today's consumers

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 87 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part
Publication date: 20 August 2020

Ewan Kirkland

This chapter explores how the narrative-based walking simulator What Remains of Edith Finch ludifies traditions of Gothic fiction. Combining Gothic themes of death, the…

Abstract

This chapter explores how the narrative-based walking simulator What Remains of Edith Finch ludifies traditions of Gothic fiction. Combining Gothic themes of death, the family and the family curse, the game involves the protagonist investigating her abandoned childhood home where every family member died a dramatic and untimely death. Sealed rooms, preserved since their inhabitants’ demise, contain shrine-like displays including a document of some form allowing players to experience the last moments of each Finch. Play involves penetrating these spaces, according to the ludo-Gothic emphasis on boundary crossing, piecing together interactive narrative fragments consistent with Gothic fiction’s patchwork storytelling. In accessing each lost manuscript, players engage in a generically specific process of multi-media trans-subjectivity, experiencing various first person perspectives and engaging with numerous gameplay interfaces. The title’s series of ambiguous unreliable narratives, its refusal of a consistent subjective position, and unreal dream-like sensation contribute to the game’s Gothic atmosphere. In a restriction of videogame agency and control, consistent with horror games, no player option is available other than to complete each pre-determined death. Gothic pastiche, a compulsion to repeat the past, and the embalming processes of photographic media are variously employed across these sequences. Play evokes the melancholy heroine, consumed by maternal loss, masochistically replaying her family’s sorrowful past, hunting for lost objects and exhuming the ghosts of her history. With its nested narrative, morbid preoccupation and ambivalent supernatural presence, the game effectively translates Gothic traditions into the videogame medium.

Details

Death, Culture & Leisure: Playing Dead
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-037-0

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1909

THE title of this short paper is somewhat of a misnomer, as the German Volks bibliothek is not the same as an English Public Library. As Dr. Schultze says: “When we speak…

Abstract

THE title of this short paper is somewhat of a misnomer, as the German Volks bibliothek is not the same as an English Public Library. As Dr. Schultze says: “When we speak of an English Public Library we know exactly what is meant, but the German Volks bibliothek does not convey any definite impression. Too often it still means a very small collection of books, probably gifts which are accessible to borrowers at certain hours each week. As a rule, the revenue is so trifling that after paying the small working costs there is little or nothing left for buying books.” Taking, therefore, the term Public Library for the sake of convenience, we may assume that the first Public Library in Germany was opened in Hamburg, in 1529, as the result of Luther's recommendation (1524) “that good libraries, especially in the large towns, should be established.” At the beginning of the 18th century, a number of free libraries were established, these were usually connected with churches and schools, yet their very name “free” seemed an invitation to everyone to share the treasures they contained. These libraries were principally in central Germany and Saxony.

Details

New Library World, vol. 11 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

Hannah Boon

Deed of Partnership 1766 ........ do covenant and agree with each other to be in partnership for the full term of 7 years to commence from this date hereof—to do our…

Abstract

Deed of Partnership 1766 ........ do covenant and agree with each other to be in partnership for the full term of 7 years to commence from this date hereof—to do our utmost to make a certain blue colour for paints a secret only known to Mr. Fredk. Rapp and Mr. Louis Steigenberger, in consideration of which Mr. John Stalder is to allow a room wherever we all dwell, and work for their colours, to keep the colours and other materials in. And the said Mr. John Stalder must not want to come into said room, nor at any time obstruct his two partners, nor give abusive language by reason of his not being made acquainted with the secret of making said blue for paint and not be allowed to know the cost of the stuff.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1944

If I were a wealthy man there are two things I would do : in the first place, I would found a Chair at one of our more progressive medical schools and instal in it a man…

Abstract

If I were a wealthy man there are two things I would do : in the first place, I would found a Chair at one of our more progressive medical schools and instal in it a man whose duty it would be to give as part of the clinical training of every student a course of lectures in the prevention of disease by good food. Something must be done to dispel from the medical man's mind the idea that vitamins are a kind of medicine to be prescribed for certain disorders, much as you give quinine to counter malaria. It has been said with much wisdom that it is better to build a fence at the top of the cliff than to maintain an ambulance at the bottom—incidentally, it is also cheaper. We do need to make it more clearly understood that, apart from all humanitarian considerations, the proper feeding of the people is a question of national insurance. This aspect of the future of nutrition has always seemed to me so obvious that it has surprised me that those whose job it is to understand the basic principles of insurance have not appreciated years ago its potential value to them. When I was in Canada recently I found, however, that they had got hold of the idea. One of the largest insurance companies in the Dominion is contributing $500,000 towards the cost of the national nutrition propaganda campaign because they are convinced that it is the most promising project for improving health and increasing expectation of life. The second benefaction I would make would be to finance the sending to each of about half a dozen countries of a small, well qualified and equipped team of young medical men and nutrition experts, trained to correlate on the spot information about diet and the incidence of disease. I would send one team to the heavy meat‐eating areas of the South American plains. They would solve in a year or two the long disputed question whether very high protein intakes are harmful to health and liable to produce certain disorders. I would send another team to South‐Eastern Europe to one of the areas where the peasants live almost entirely on vegetables, coarse bread and goats' milk. Is it true that these people have a very low incidence of digestive disorders and hardly ever suffer from cancer of the digestive tract? We do not know, but a team using standardised methods of examination and survey would not be long in finding the truth. Dr. Sinclair and his Oxford Nutrition Survey team has prepared the model of what is required. Such teams will, I believe, be widely used in the post‐war years. They may actually be required even earlier. They would be invaluable if they could be rushed into territories as soon as they are liberated from the enemy, where their task would be to survey and advise on the nutritional conditions of the liberated people—which in many cases, we fear, are likely to be grievous. War has few virtues. One undoubtedly is that activity in many fields of enterprise is enormously stimulated. Another is that problems can often be lifted clear of the arena of political dispute. This war of liberation will offer some compensation for the devastation and waste of human effort if it brings nearer by years the day when every man, woman and child can be assured that they will never know the want of the foods on which their health depends. Not until that day dawns can the Atlantic Charter, calling for freedom from fear, freedom from want, become reality.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

I have a friend in Pennsylvania who stoutly refuses to believe that when asked by strangers what I do for a living, I say that I'm a librarian. “Nonsense,” she says…

Abstract

I have a friend in Pennsylvania who stoutly refuses to believe that when asked by strangers what I do for a living, I say that I'm a librarian. “Nonsense,” she says, “you're a library director, and directors never describe themselves as ‘librarians.’ Librarians don't have ‘power’ breakfasts,” she concludes. “Directors do!”

Details

Collection Building, vol. 10 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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