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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2021

David S. Waller and Helen J. Waller

In recent years, there has been a “heritagisation” of pop culture, including music, whereby cultural institutions, such as galleries and museums in primarily Western…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, there has been a “heritagisation” of pop culture, including music, whereby cultural institutions, such as galleries and museums in primarily Western countries, have run exhibitions based on pop culture to successfully market to a new audience of visitors. The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore the issue of the “heritagisation” of pop culture by museums and observe visitor response to a specific music-related exhibition, linking intangible and tangible elements of the exhibition to provide a framework to understand the visitor experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose will be achieved by observing the “heritagisation” of pop culture in the literature and past exhibitions, proposing how cultural institutions have linked the intangible and tangible elements of music in pop culture for an exhibition and observe visitors' feedback from online comments posted on Tripadvisor undertaken during the original “David Bowie is” exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), London.

Findings

From the Leximancer analysis, a new conceptual framework for visitor experience at an exhibition was developed, which contains three visitor-related categories: pre-exhibition, exhibition space and exhibition experience, with five themes (tickets, exhibition, displayed objects, David Bowie and visitors) and 41 text concepts.

Practical implications

For cultural institutions the implications are that there can be opportunities to curate exhibitions on pop culture or music-related themes, which can include intangible and tangible elements, such as songs, videos, tickets, costumes, musical instruments and posters. These exhibitions can also explore the changing socio/political/historical/cultural background that contextualises pop cultural history.

Originality/value

This theory-building study advances the body of knowledge as it links music in pop culture and cultural institutions, specifically in this case a highly successful music-related exhibition at a museum, and provides a theoretical model based on tangibility elements. Further, it analyses museum visitor comments by using the qualitative software program, Leximancer, to develop a new conceptual framework for visitor experience.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

David Bowie

The purpose of this paper is to reveal, how newspaper archives can support contextualisation in management history research by providing quantitative and/or qualitative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal, how newspaper archives can support contextualisation in management history research by providing quantitative and/or qualitative, accurate, contemporary and cost-effective, data which is not always available elsewhere.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper comprises a literature review, which summarises research into contextual analysis and newspaper archive theory; combined with content and textual analysis of articles published in the Journal of Management History and Management and Organizational History (2013-2017).

Findings

The findings reveal that the concept of contextualisation is absent from recent management history articles and that few management historians use newspaper archival sources as a data collection strategy.

Research limitations/implications

There is compelling evidence to suggest that contextual analysis can – perhaps should – be incorporated into management historians’ research strategies because managerial organisations operate in open systems, which are influenced by external factors.

Originality/value

This paper juxtaposes two neglected aspects of management history research, contextuality and newspaper archives, and proposes that a key source for historic contextual analysis is newspaper data.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2015

Toni Eagar and Andrew Lindridge

The academic discourse around celebrity and iconicity has resulted in the same human brand as labeled as an inauthentic and illegitimate celebrity and as a culturally…

Abstract

Purpose

The academic discourse around celebrity and iconicity has resulted in the same human brand as labeled as an inauthentic and illegitimate celebrity and as a culturally important symbol of legitimate achievement. We address the research question of how are contradictions between celebrity and iconicity resolved in creating and managing a human brand.

Methodology/approach

Using structuration theory, we analyzed David Bowie’s 50 year career, from 1964 to 2013, totaling 562 documents. Applying Langley’s (1999) stages of data collection of grounding, organizing, and replicating, we develop a process of model of celebrity and iconicity.

Findings

We identify three stages of human brand symbolic associations: forming, fixing, and transitioning associations. These represent alternate trajectories that Bowie and Ziggy Stardust followed to become icons. In resolving his trajectories across these stages, Bowie adapts and adopts commercial materials, business practices, and new technologies to converge his symbolic associations into a coherent iconic human brand.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this paper lie in focusing on one human brand in a particular industry. Future research is suggested in three areas: (1) the relationship between the proposed model and other human brand activities; (2) to explore how the process is manipulated by other market agents; and (3) whether a human brand’s association shifts can precede culture.

Originality/value

This perspective challenges existing conceptualizations of celebrity and iconicity by framing them as inter-related processes, where celebrity associations are fixed in time, while iconic associations transition across time periods to reflect changing cultural values and concerns.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-323-5

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Book part
Publication date: 5 January 2016

Abstract

Details

Storytelling-Case Archetype Decoding and Assignment Manual (SCADAM)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-216-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Melvin Simensky and Lisa A. Small

Intellectual property owners put themselves at a competitive disadvantage if they rely only on traditional insurance policies to manage risk.

Abstract

Intellectual property owners put themselves at a competitive disadvantage if they rely only on traditional insurance policies to manage risk.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2010

David A. Abrahams

This paper examines the issues and barriers that inhibit faculty from using technology in instruction. It uses the diffusion and adoption theory as a means to understand…

Abstract

This paper examines the issues and barriers that inhibit faculty from using technology in instruction. It uses the diffusion and adoption theory as a means to understand and explain how individuals and organisations react when an innovation is introduced into their environment. The framework proposed combines the empirical data from research using concept mapping with the theoretical factors identified from the literature to create a structured process that identifies the priority issues and barriers to technology adoption. Multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis were used to analyse the data gathered from the brainstorming session. A barrier definition and classification scheme was created and used to connect issues to barriers of adoption. Descriptive mixed methods approach was also used to develop a pictorial multivariate conceptual framework for understanding the relationships between issues and barriers to adopting instructional technology. Findings suggest that as a higher education institution in the early adoption phase of using instructional technology approaches critical mass of faculty users, it must address the issues of the critical mass, in order for the mainstream faculty to see the utility in the use of instructional technology in the classroom. This research lays the foundation for further research into the development of a systematic process or approach for managing the diffusion and adoption of technology in instruction at an institute of higher education.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Ruth Penfold-Mounce

Abstract

Details

Death, The Dead and Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-053-2

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Book part
Publication date: 10 September 2018

David C. Giles

Abstract

Details

Twenty-First Century Celebrity: Fame In Digital Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-212-9

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Abstract

Details

Popular Music, Popular Myth and Cultural Heritage in Cleveland: The Moondog, The Buzzard, and the Battle for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-156-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Elspeth McFadzean

Innovation is a necessary function of organisations today. In order to develop innovative products, services and procedures, managers must encourage and promote creative…

Abstract

Innovation is a necessary function of organisations today. In order to develop innovative products, services and procedures, managers must encourage and promote creative thinking within their organisation. Everyone can be creative but there are some people who have a naturally creative flair. This paper examines some of the behaviour and creative processes that these people undertake in order to develop imaginative and novel ideas. Specifically, the paper describes some of the thoughts, ideas and behaviours of Brian Eno, a rock musician in the 1970s, and compares them with some of the other great creative minds of the past such as George Bernard Shaw and Michael Faraday. The paper concludes with some lessons that have been drawn from exploring the minds of these people and recommends that managers should nurture creativity with their organisation.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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