Search results

1 – 10 of over 5000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1983

Relatively simple and standard sensing equipment is quite adequate for some quite advanced and productive applications with robots, as has been demonstrated at the…

Abstract

Relatively simple and standard sensing equipment is quite adequate for some quite advanced and productive applications with robots, as has been demonstrated at the Cranfield Robot Automation Group. Jack Hollingum went to find out about it from David Williams.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Anita Whiting, David L. Williams and Joe Hair

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Anita Whiting, David L. Williams and Joe Hair

The purpose of this study is to investigate motives for engaging in electronic word of mouth (eWOM) about organizations on social media sites. This study explores motives…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate motives for engaging in electronic word of mouth (eWOM) about organizations on social media sites. This study explores motives for posting positive eWOM and motives for posting negative eWOM. It also investigates whether existing WOM frameworks adequately capture consumers’ motives for spreading eWOM within the context of social media. This study seeks to confirm established motives in literature while also identifying new motives specific to social media.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was conducted using the critical incident technique. In all, 64 positive incidents and 60 negative incidents were analyzed.

Findings

This study provides a typology for understanding consumers’ motivations for engaging in positive and negative WOM within the context of social media. Four new motives for sharing eWOM are identified; eight established WOM motives are re-confirmed; and new subcategories for eWOM motives are proposed. The study also finds that further refinement of WOM motives and scales within a social media context is needed.

Research limitations/implications

An integrated conceptual framework of both positive and negative motives is developed to illustrate a more comprehensive model of motives of eWOM within social media. Managerial implications for managing negative eWOM and amplifying positive eWOM are discussed. A limitation is that the study is exploratory in nature.

Originality/value

This study identifies new motives for sharing eWOM, re-labels existing WOM and eWOM motives with more descriptive and comprehensive titles and confirms established WOM and eWOM motives within the context of social media. This study is conducted across multiple firms and industries, leading to more generalizable results.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

David Williams

The development of multinational subsidiaries is of interest to academics, policy‐makers and the business community. Although there is a considerable literature on…

Abstract

The development of multinational subsidiaries is of interest to academics, policy‐makers and the business community. Although there is a considerable literature on subsidiary typologies, there is a dearth of empirical investigation to accompany this. This article reports on a field‐work survey which was undertaken to analyse the nature of subsidiary development in the UK economy. A large sample of companies were asked to provide details of their value‐added activities and degree of strategic autonomy granted by their parent organisations. These data were collected in respect of their entry to the UK and at the time of the survey so that a comparison would yield conclusions about subsidiary development. The analysis of the data reveals that subsidiary development is associated with the ownership (i.e. geographical location) of the parent company, as well as the entry mode which the parent company chooses to enter the host economy. The precise nature of these relationships is complex and the article concludes by suggesting some future research agendas in this area.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 98 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Nastaran Simarasl, Kaveh Moghaddam and David W. Williams

The purpose of this paper is to investigate aspiring immigrant opportunity (AIO) entrepreneurs' start-up location decisions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate aspiring immigrant opportunity (AIO) entrepreneurs' start-up location decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used conjoint analysis to explore 1,264 location decisions nested within 79 highly educated, first-generation AIO entrepreneurs.

Findings

The authors found that although government support positively influences business location decisions, network support decreases the perceived benefits of government support for AIO entrepreneurs. Furthermore, locations with high costs of doing business are unattractive to AIO entrepreneurs, but financial capital access through ethnic and nonethnic sources in these locations enhances the appeal of high-cost locations.

Research limitations/implications

The generalizability of the findings to AIO entrepreneurs should be considered with caution. Future research should longitudinally examine immigrant opportunity entrepreneurs' location decisions and their implications for their start-up and community-level performance outcomes. The authors also encourage replication of the study.

Practical implications

The findings of this study have implications for AIO entrepreneurs who intend to make start-up location decisions. Also, government policymakers can use the findings of this study to better attract AIO entrepreneurs to different locations.

Originality/value

By integrating ethnic enclave theory and location theory, this research contributes to theory and practice about immigrant opportunity entrepreneurs' start-up location decisions which are currently underexplored in the immigrant entrepreneurship literature.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Anita Whiting, David Williams and Joe F. Hair

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Ariel Sanders, Barbara J. Phillips and David E. Williams

The relationship between musicians and the music industry has often been depicted as a dichotomy between creativity and commerce with musicians conflicted between their…

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between musicians and the music industry has often been depicted as a dichotomy between creativity and commerce with musicians conflicted between their roles as artists and their roles as marketers of sound. Recently, marketing researchers have problematized this dichotomy and suggested musicians perceive these roles as inevitable and indivisible. However, the processes of how musicians market their sound to the industry gatekeepers remain unclear. This study seeks to find the key industry gatekeepers for musicians and how musicians sell their personal sound to them.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an interpretative phenomenological approach, ten interviews with professional musicians across different music genres provided insight into the strategies musicians use to market their sound to industry gatekeepers.

Findings

In total, three key gatekeepers and the five strategies that musicians use to sell their sound are identified. The gatekeepers are record labels, other musicians and consumers. Musicians sell their sound to these gatekeepers through the externally directed strategies of using social media to build relationships, defining their personal sound through genre and creating a unique sound, and through the internally directed strategies of keeping motivated through sound evolution and counting on luck.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited by the small number of musicians interviewed and the heterogeneous representation of music genres.

Originality/value

The study contributes to theoretical understandings of how musicians as cultural producers market their sound in a commercial industry.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Stephanie A. Pankiw, Barbara J. Phillips and David E. Williams

Luxury brands seek to differentiate themselves from competitors by engaging in corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices. Although many luxury brands participate in…

Abstract

Purpose

Luxury brands seek to differentiate themselves from competitors by engaging in corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices. Although many luxury brands participate in CSR activities, it is unclear if luxury brands communicate these CSR activities to consumers. Therefore, this study aims to explore two questions: are luxury jewelry brands communicating CSR (including women’s empowerment) in their advertising? And how should luxury jewelry brands communicate CSR messages in their advertising?

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a content analysis of luxury jewelry print advertisements and in-depth interviews with 20 female jewelry consumers analyzed using grounded theory to construct the luxury brand CSR advertising strategies theory.

Findings

Very few (3%) of print advertisements contain CSR messages, including femvertising and the theory presents four paths for brands to consider when promoting CSR practices, namely, ethical sourcing, cause-related marketing product, a signal of product care and quality and signal of an authentic relationship with the consumer.

Practical implications

The model provides four potential CSR advertising strategies and guidelines luxury jewelry brands can use to create successful advertising campaigns.

Originality/value

Luxury jewelry advertising has not been empirically examined and the study fills gaps in the understanding of luxury brands’ communication strategies. It adds to the knowledge and theorizing of the use and appropriateness of CSR appeals in a luxury brand context.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

David E. Williams, Elly-Jean Nielsen, Melanie A. Morrison and Todd G. Morrison

This study aims to explore the perceptions and reactions of men, who participate in a female-dominated online consumption space. It looked at the process of men…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the perceptions and reactions of men, who participate in a female-dominated online consumption space. It looked at the process of men, (re)negotiating their digital gendered identity on Pinterest.

Design/methodology/approach

A grounded theory-light approach was taken. Data were collected through 21 one-on-one semi-structured interviews with male Pinterest users. Subsequently, data were extensively coded and analyzed for the key themes and patterns.

Findings

Three core categories emerged, which speak to the ways men account for their practices on Pinterest as autonomous online agents. These categories were: awareness of Pinterest as a feminized digital space; limited sociality due to the solitary use of Pinterest (the exception being when collaborating with an intimate partner); and performed identities (k = 4) serving to justify the men’s activities on a female-dominated social networking site.

Research limitations/implications

The findings establish a firm theoretical basis for understanding male Pinterest users as autonomous online agents. However, reflective of this relatively small, exploratory qualitative project, the process-based interview questions did not render, particularly, long or rich narratives. Future qualitative research might endeavor to ask deeper, more open-ended questions.

Originality/value

This is an original study of men’s use of Pinterest. Research on the identity projects of men entering fields traditionally occupied by women and coded as feminine is established, there is a lack of understanding of how gender identity is (re)constructed digitally, especially on social media.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

E. Kenneth Eckersley, E. Kenneth Eckersley and David A. Williams

Drugs are hitting at the roots of our productivity and competitiveness, as their usage escalates amongst current employees and those entering full‐time work for the first…

Abstract

Drugs are hitting at the roots of our productivity and competitiveness, as their usage escalates amongst current employees and those entering full‐time work for the first time. Main symptoms are rising absenteeism, injuries, damage and stealing. But employers are having difficulty in recognising their cause, mainly through ignorance, lack of trained knowledge and fear of what is still a relatively new phenomenon. The realistic answer is the development and implementation of effective substance misuse policies in full consultation with staff representatives. But this is a precise and skilled activity requiring proper training of personnel management and staff supervisors. The article exposes the breadth of the problem, discusses how to train British staff and examines how our training industry can gear up to learn this newest and most vital of training subjects.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 5000