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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

David Wells

The purpose of this paper is to extend the principles of earlier print-based availability surveys to the context of today’s electronic library, and explores the question…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the principles of earlier print-based availability surveys to the context of today’s electronic library, and explores the question of an appropriate methodology. The ability of clients to find what they want remains a central question, as does the library’s ability to identify and address the reasons that clients fail to find what they are looking for.

Design/methodology/approach

Catalogue users at Curtin University Library were invited to complete an online survey indicating whether they had found the electronic item they were looking for, and if not to nominate the reason why. Responses were then verified and analysed by library staff.

Findings

The survey attracted a low number of usable responses, though the proportion of respondents who stated they were able to find what they were looking for was consistent with the findings of earlier studies. It was possible to identify a small number of cases where the library did not hold the item required, though most failures were either due to technical reasons or could not be fully investigated because not enough information was provided by the respondent.

Research limitations/implications

The survey conducted was inconclusive, partly because the delivery method used was quite cumbersome, and also because it focussed on known item searches rather than topic searches. The paper includes suggestions on how the survey could be broadened and technically improved.

Originality/value

The paper shows the value and limitations of conducting a materials availability survey in the electronic library, and makes suggestions on how the effectiveness of such a survey can be maximised.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Jean J. Boddewyn

This title is obviously a variation on the major theme of Bill Clinton's presidential campaign in 1992. His emphasis on the state of the U.S. economy underscored the fact…

Abstract

This title is obviously a variation on the major theme of Bill Clinton's presidential campaign in 1992. His emphasis on the state of the U.S. economy underscored the fact that, at times, certain topics have achieved or deserve greater salience. And so, my theme is that the study and teaching of international business must place greater emphasis on political institutions, developments andbehaviors.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Book part
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Timothy Vercellotti

Who will lead Ambridge in the years to come? Theories rooted in psychology and political science, when applied to family dynamics in The Archers, allow for some educated…

Abstract

Who will lead Ambridge in the years to come? Theories rooted in psychology and political science, when applied to family dynamics in The Archers, allow for some educated guesses. Social learning theory suggests that children who see their parents vote, run for office and participate in other civic activities are more likely to do the same in adulthood. Emma Grundy did just that when she followed in the footsteps of her father, Neil Carter, in winning a seat on the parish council. Previous research has found that birth order also can shape future leaders, with the eldest child more likely to benefit developmentally from parents' undivided attention in the early years, and also more likely to establish a hierarchy of power over younger siblings. With these factors in mind, who are the most probable contenders to lead Ambridge in the spheres of politics, business and civic affairs? The extant research points to Pip Archer, Lily Pargetter, Phoebe Aldridge and George Grundy. The unique circumstances of Ruairi Donovan's childhood suggest he may also be a formidable candidate. And, as is the case in so many contexts, one would be wise not to overlook Molly Button.

Details

Flapjacks and Feudalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-389-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Darryl W. Miller

The purpose of this paper is to review a popular business handbook – The Business Guide – by James L. Nichols, first published around the turn of the twentieth century…

138

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review a popular business handbook – The Business Guide – by James L. Nichols, first published around the turn of the twentieth century. The analysis is geared toward determining how it fits within the development of marketing thought and education.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the marketing history literature focusing on marketing thought, education and practice around the turn of the twentieth century is conducted. The content of The Business Guide is analyzed and compared with the themes reflected in the literature review.

Findings

Most editions appeared in the era just proceeding the emergence of marketing as distinct discipline. It is unlikely that it had any appreciable influence on the development of marketing thought. However, it was used as a textbook at North-Western College in Naperville, IL, and may have been at other early business education programs in the USA and Canada. Nichols’ treatment of marketing topics was consistent with the era. It reflected commodities and functional views. For him, marketing was primarily distribution along with advertising, pricing, product management and credit. Consistent with modern marketing philosophy, Nichols placed heavy emphasis on ethics.

Originality/value

Despite the fact that this book was published in multiple editions over several decades, it seems to have been largely forgotten. As far as is known, this paper is the only recent treatment of this historical artifact.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Contesting Institutional Hegemony in Today’s Business Schools
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-341-2

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1984

For a number of years the Building Maintenance Cost Information Service, an arm of the RICS, has been collecting and disseminating property occupancy cost information on a…

Abstract

For a number of years the Building Maintenance Cost Information Service, an arm of the RICS, has been collecting and disseminating property occupancy cost information on a standardised basis. David Wells of the BMCIS writes about this invaluable research activity, which has resulted in the creation of universal cost comparisons between buildings — and which tells the facilities manager a great deal about the real occupancy costs of his buildings.

Details

Facilities, vol. 2 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Book part
Publication date: 12 April 2005

Chester Whitney Wright (1879–1966) received his A.B. in 1901, A.M. in 1902 and Ph.D. in 1906, all from Harvard University. After teaching at Cornell University during…

Abstract

Chester Whitney Wright (1879–1966) received his A.B. in 1901, A.M. in 1902 and Ph.D. in 1906, all from Harvard University. After teaching at Cornell University during 1906–1907, he taught at the University of Chicago from 1907 to 1944. Wright was the author of Economic History of the United States (1941, 1949); editor of Economic Problems of War and Its Aftermath (1942), to which he contributed a chapter on economic lessons from previous wars, and other chapters were authored by John U. Nef (war and the early industrial revolution) and by Frank H. Knight (the war and the crisis of individualism); and co-editor of Materials for the Study of Elementary Economics (1913). Wright’s Wool-Growing and the Tariff received the David Ames Wells Prize for 1907–1908, and was volume 5 in the Harvard Economic Studies. I am indebted to Holly Flynn for assistance in preparing Wright’s biography and in tracking down incomplete references; to Marianne Johnson in preparing many tables and charts; and to F. Taylor Ostrander, as usual, for help in transcribing and proofreading.

Details

Further University of Wisconsin Materials: Further Documents of F. Taylor Ostrander
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-166-8

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

David Wells

32

Abstract

Details

European Business Review, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

R. Rothschild

In 1933, Edward H. Chamberlin published the Theory of Monopolistic Competition (1962). The work, based upon a dissertation submitted for a PhD degree in Harvard University…

Abstract

In 1933, Edward H. Chamberlin published the Theory of Monopolistic Competition (1962). The work, based upon a dissertation submitted for a PhD degree in Harvard University in 1927 and awarded the David A. Wells prize for 1927–28, has since become a milestone in the development of economic thought. Its impact on industrial organisation theory, general equilibrium and welfare economics, international trade theory and, to a greater or lesser degree, all other branches of economic analysis, has been pervasive and enduring. The ideas set out in the book have been developed, expanded and refined in ways too numerous to be identified precisely, and the books and articles which take Chamberlin's contribution as a starting point arguably exceed in number those on any other single subject in the lexicon of economics.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

David B. Wells

Discusses the microcomputer policy implemented by Las Vegas‐ClarkCounty Library District. Examines the goals of the computer publicaccess facility, the software used, the…

Abstract

Discusses the microcomputer policy implemented by Las Vegas‐Clark County Library District. Examines the goals of the computer public access facility, the software used, the staff, the access policies, and the staff training program. Summarises that public access to computers should be kept manageable, that Macs have proved as popular as IBMs, and that only the most popular software should be used initially.

Details

OCLC Micro, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 8756-5196

Keywords

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