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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Mary Weir and Jim Hughes

Introduction Consider a hi‐fi loudspeaker manufacturing company acquired on the brink of insolvency by an American multinational. The new owners discover with growing…

Abstract

Introduction Consider a hi‐fi loudspeaker manufacturing company acquired on the brink of insolvency by an American multinational. The new owners discover with growing concern that the product range is obsolete, that manufacturing facilities are totally inadequate and that there is a complete absence of any real management substance or structure. They decide on the need to relocate urgently so as to provide continuity of supply at the very high — a market about to shrink at a rate unprecedented in its history.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Timothy C. Weiskel and Richard A. Gray

To provide a brief illustration of how the circumstances of economic underdevelopment and ecological decline are reciprocally linked, we can begin by tracing the…

Abstract

To provide a brief illustration of how the circumstances of economic underdevelopment and ecological decline are reciprocally linked, we can begin by tracing the post‐World War II history of Africa. Political histories of the post‐war period abound for almost all parts of the continent, since it was during this era that many African colonies struggled for and won political independence. Detailed ecological histories of colonialism and the post‐colonial states, however, are just beginning to be researched and written. Nevertheless, several broad patterns and general trends of this history are now becoming apparent, and they can be set forth in rough narrative form even though detailed histories have yet to be compiled.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2017

David Weir

The purpose of this paper is to provide an ethnographic account of a folk music venue from the perspective of a participant observer.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an ethnographic account of a folk music venue from the perspective of a participant observer.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a classic thick description, describing the central participants in a performance and the operation of spacing and timing processes, thus significantly creating private ownership of a public space.

Findings

There are collective proceses of spacing and timing that are informal but normative framing what superficially appears to constitute random or unstructured activities. The musical knowledge and performance competence drive these processes rather than externally visible considerations of authenticity.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is a single-venue descriptive research.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the relatively few small-scale ethnographies of urban music venues.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2013

David Jacobs

Abstract

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Getting Things Done
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-954-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Ahmed al Janahi and David Weir

Most studies of crisis management and business failure are based on research in western economic situations and assume western institutional patterns and attitudes. These…

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Abstract

Most studies of crisis management and business failure are based on research in western economic situations and assume western institutional patterns and attitudes. These assume that certain fundamental elements of financial rationality guide the intervention of banks and financial institutions in situations of incipient business failure. This study is based on an empirical analysis of companies in the GCC region of companies which are clients of banks which operate within the frameworks of the Islamic Banking System in the Arab Middle East. A “sharp‐bending” orientation rather than a “business failure” model is used and conclusions are reached about the role of the banks and other financial institutions and their methods of managing difficult client situations. Some typical situations relating to problem loans, loan officers’ responses and behaviour and out comes are reviewed. The role of the bank in triggering early problem‐recognition is described and the response of the bank, subsequent actions and the sequence of recovery are described. Procedures and actions which would be regarded as “irrational” in a western cultural context are interpretable as “rational” within different cultural frameworks. We argue that there is no one universally‐accepted frame work of business rationality, and that “financial rationalities” are the product of deeply‐embedded cultural frames of reference.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Kate Hutchings and David Weir

To explore the implications of internationalisation for guanxi and wasta and the role of trust, family and favours in underpinning these traditional models of networking…

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Abstract

Purpose

To explore the implications of internationalisation for guanxi and wasta and the role of trust, family and favours in underpinning these traditional models of networking. The paper also draws some implications for management development professionals and trainers.

Design/methodology/approach

The argument is based on relevant literature and cases, and the authors' own knowledge acquired through research in China over 8 years and the Arab World over 25 years. The Chinese research involved analysis of company reports, informal conversations and semi‐structured interviews conducted with almost 100 interviewees including Western expatriate managers and local Chinese managers between 1998 and 2005 in Shanghai, Beijing, Suzhou and Wuxi. The Arab research also involved analysis of company reports and informal conversations, as well as interviews and surveys conducted throughout the Middle Eastern region, including the GCC states, Algeria, Jordan, Libya, Palestine and Yemen.

Findings

The research finds differences in the continuing relevance of guanxi and wasta and suggests that while guanxi is adapting to internationalisation, wasta remains traditional in its influence on business and social life.

Practical implications

The paper suggests the need for increased training of international managers to adjust to culture‐specific networking in China and the Arab World and provides some practical guidelines to managers to assist their intercultural effectiveness in these two regions of the world.

Originality/value

The research is important in that it extends knowledge of traditional networking practices in exploring the Arab World which is hitherto under‐researched and in undertaking comparative examination of China and the Arab World which is also a new area of research.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Steve McKenna, M.N. Ravishankar and David Weir

– The purpose of this paper is to introduce the papers in the special issue.

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479

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the papers in the special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A general description of each paper in the special issue is provided. The introduction highlights the need for more research into the broad topic of the global elite.

Findings

Research in the social sciences uses a very broad definition of the global elite. It would be helpful in critical management and organization studies and critical international business research, to begin to identify important and key research areas that enable a more critical investigation of whom the global elite are and how they might be studied.

Originality/value

This paper introduces five diverse papers that deal with issues pertaining to a global elite and transnational capitalist class.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Getting Things Done
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-954-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Jane James and David Weir

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436

Abstract

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Management Decision, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1993

David T.H. Weir

Contrasts two types of disaster: natural and man‐made. Examines theaetiology of both. Suggests that unless disasters are approached with aprogramme of interdisciplinary…

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342

Abstract

Contrasts two types of disaster: natural and man‐made. Examines the aetiology of both. Suggests that unless disasters are approached with a programme of interdisciplinary research, our understanding and dealing with the complex symptomatology of crisis and catastrophe will be impaired.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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