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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

David W. Taylor and Antonella Reintano

The early literature on learning in small firms has been linked to individual learning through training. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of networks as a vehicle…

Abstract

The early literature on learning in small firms has been linked to individual learning through training. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of networks as a vehicle for learning through knowledge transfer. It is how this network‐learning takes place that this paper helps to elucidate. The focus in this paper is a particular ‘life or death’ decision point at Totti Industrie, a small religious clothing manufacturer in Calabria, Italy. A problem‐centred approach was adopted in order to assess how the owner‐manager learned to solve problems and ultimately arrive at a decision. Preliminary findings diverge from similar studies undertaken in the United Kingdom where networks are less extensive but utilised more completely to resolve business related problems. It is suggested that a more limited use of the wider network could be down to the intensity and vastness of network relations and the susceptibility of this wider‐network to leakage of valuable company information.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2022

Maria Gianni, Antonella Reitano, Marco Fazio, Athanasia Gkimperiti, Nikolaos Karanasios and David W. Taylor

During the Covid-19 pandemic, people were deprived of their freedom, unable to engage in physical and social activities, and worried about their health. Uncertainty, insecurity…

Abstract

Purpose

During the Covid-19 pandemic, people were deprived of their freedom, unable to engage in physical and social activities, and worried about their health. Uncertainty, insecurity, and confinement are all factors that may induce stress, uneasiness, fear, and depression. In this context, this study aims to identify possible relationships of emotions caused by health risks and restrictions to outdoor activities with well-informed decisions about food consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical framework of this research draws on the stimulus-organism-response paradigm yielding six research hypotheses. An online survey was designated to test these hypotheses. A total of 1,298 responses were gathered from Italy, Greece, and the United Kingdom. Data analyses include demographic group comparisons, moderation, and multiple regression tests.

Findings

The results showed that when people miss their usual activities (including freedom of movement, social contact, travelling, personal care services, leisure activities, and eating at restaurants) and worry about their health and the health of their families, they turn to safer food choices of higher quality, dedicating more of their time and resources to cooking and eating.

Research limitations/implications

The findings showcase how risk-based thinking is critical for management and marketing strategies. Academics and practitioners may rely on these findings to include extreme conditions within their scope, understanding food literacy as a resilience factor to cope with health risks and stimulated emotions.

Originality/value

This study identified food behavioural patterns under risk-laden conditions. A health risk acted as an opportunity to look at food consumption as a means of resilience.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

David W. Taylor and Richard Thorpe

Applying social concepts to the social relations that the entrepreneur maintains, this research seeks to identify the impact of these relationships, and the learning that might…

4468

Abstract

Applying social concepts to the social relations that the entrepreneur maintains, this research seeks to identify the impact of these relationships, and the learning that might result from them, on the decision‐making process. A social and conversational model of experiential learning is put forward, where learning and influence are seen to emerge as part of an ongoing negotiated process. This argument complements Kolb's “fundamentally cognitive” theory of experiential learning, by challenging the view that the learner should be viewed as an “intellectual Robinson Crusoe”, and stating that even when an individual reflects and theorises their thoughts have a social character. Data were collected using critical incident technique through one‐to‐one in‐depth interviews over several weeks. The paper goes some way to confirm the importance of networks in the business development process, helping further to define how networks exist. The learning identified, is understood therefore as part of an ongoing negotiated process within a complex network of domestic, voluntary, commercial and professional relations.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

David W. Taylor

5418

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 January 2008

David W. Taylor

2898

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

David W. Taylor

396

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Fernando Lourenço, Natalie Sappleton, Akosua Dardaine-Edwards, Gerard McElwee, Ranis Cheng, David W. Taylor and Anthony G. Taylor

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the success of a scheme, supported by the Ugandan Agribusiness Initiative Trust, to fund gender and entrepreneurship training for women…

1878

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the success of a scheme, supported by the Ugandan Agribusiness Initiative Trust, to fund gender and entrepreneurship training for women farmers in the north of Uganda (Gulu District and Lira District). Moreover, this paper reflects upon our experience of delivering training for women farmers and highlights key observations related to women’s entrepreneurship in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

A practitioner-based reflection which shares the experiences of the process of developing and delivering gender and entrepreneurship training for women in Uganda.

Findings

Through the experience of running gender and entrepreneurship training for women farmers in Uganda, a series of barriers to female rural entrepreneurs are highlighted: lack of access to credit, gender inequality, poor infrastructure, lack of access to knowledge and education, negative attitudes towards women and few initiatives to facilitate economic and business success.

Originality/value

This paper provides reflection of the experience gained from the delivery of training and interaction with women farmers and entrepreneurs in Uganda.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2013

Fernando Lourenço, Tony G. Taylor and David W. Taylor

This paper seeks to highlight the role of entrepreneurship education in encouraging the growth of graduate entrepreneurship in the UK to help overcome the over‐supply of…

2065

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to highlight the role of entrepreneurship education in encouraging the growth of graduate entrepreneurship in the UK to help overcome the over‐supply of university graduates in a very difficult employment market. This paper aims to discuss the design principle for entrepreneurship education that facilitates graduate entrepreneurship, and the design methodology that allows multi‐faculty collaboration in the provision of entrepreneurship programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper begins with the conceptualisation of design principles and frameworks based on current concepts found in the literature, followed by practitioner‐based reflection to shed insights into the process of developing entrepreneurship education in higher education institutions (HEIs).

Findings

The authors have developed the “30/70 methodology” to guide the future design of entrepreneurship education, and the “80/20 methodology” to support cross‐faculty entrepreneurship programmes to serve non‐business students. Factors that impede or support academic entrepreneurship and effective integration of entrepreneurship programmes in HEIs are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper shares the authors' experiences, and their unique design principles and methodology to support the development of education for entrepreneurship.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

David W. Taylor, Oswald Jones and Kevin Boles

According to Woolcock, social capital can be defined as the “norms and networks facilitating collective action for mutual benefit”. Furthermore, Gabbay and Leenders suggest that…

3558

Abstract

According to Woolcock, social capital can be defined as the “norms and networks facilitating collective action for mutual benefit”. Furthermore, Gabbay and Leenders suggest that social capital offers some potential for integrating the proliferation of network research that has been developed over the last 30 years. Examines an innovatory partnership between Manchester Metropolitan University Business School (MMUBS) and a number of agencies including the Prince's Trust to provide skills to entrepreneurs from socially disadvantaged backgrounds. The New Entrepreneur Scholarship Scheme (NESS) was the result of an initiative by the Chancellor Gordon Brown to encourage higher education institutes to make a larger contribution to the UK's entrepreneurial culture. MMUBS piloted the first NESS programme for 18 nascent entrepreneurs. It was decided to adopt an “action‐learning” approach concentrating on the development of a realistic business idea as well as creating a supportive environment within the group. This intervention has aided NESS participants by building and strengthening networks that become the basis of their social capital.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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