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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2019

David W. Atkinson

This paper aims to examine the new teaching universities created in British Columbia and Alberta over the past 10 years in the context of the multiple challenges faced by higher…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the new teaching universities created in British Columbia and Alberta over the past 10 years in the context of the multiple challenges faced by higher education today, including issues of purpose, culture, governance, accountability and finances.

Design/methodology/approach

The essay provides a historic overview of the challenges universities face today. In this context, it presents the new Western Canadian universities as a possible model, even while identifying the challenges these institutions face in the future.

Findings

This case study concludes that universities must change if they are to meet the expectations of students and the needs of society. It outlines the challenges faced by the new universities, how they have responded, the successes they have experienced and the challenges they confront.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study of the new Canadian universities.

Details

On the Horizon , vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

David W. Atkinson

Much has been written about the crisis in the Humanities even as student interest in the Humanities continues to decline. In the so-called “post-truth,” “post-COVID19” period,”…

Abstract

Purpose

Much has been written about the crisis in the Humanities even as student interest in the Humanities continues to decline. In the so-called “post-truth,” “post-COVID19” period,” however, the Humanities deserve attention for the important role they must play in preparing students for the world during a period of dramatic change.

Design/methodology/approach

Discussion focuses on the “post-truth” period and how the Humanities have a role in confronting misinformation and “fake news.” It provides specific actions for how those in the Humanities might address the current situation. It relies on the author’s considerable background as a university Dean and President over a period of over 40 years and draws on a variety of written material addressing the future of the Humanities.

Findings

In a period when the world confronts unprecedented change, when misinformation is confused with the truth and when social media exercises so much influence, students more than ever need the insight and context of the Humanities to mitigate the cant, bogus claims and questionable ethics that so much shape the world. Responsibility falls to faculty as they must make clear to their students how the Humanities provide a perspective that allows students to work through the big questions of their time.

Research limitations/implications

Much has been written about the challenges facing the Humanities. It is hoped that this paper will generate additional discussion on how the Humanities might assert themselves during what are troubling times in higher education.

Originality/value

The author’s long experience as a senior university administrator provides a perspective that faculty and administrators might find useful as they consider the future of the Humanities at their institutions.

Details

On the Horizon , vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 November 2022

Nicolette DeVille Christensen

This study aims to raise the issue of the president as the intellectual leader of the university in that they are the voice of the importance of the Humanities, both in inclusion…

155

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to raise the issue of the president as the intellectual leader of the university in that they are the voice of the importance of the Humanities, both in inclusion and diversity measures, in decolonizing the curriculum and recognizing the importance of teaching life skills to students.

Design/methodology/approach

Discussion focuses on unrealistic workloads of university and college presidents which have engendered a move away from the president as central to the academic mission. It is drawn from the author's 30 years of service in senior leadership posts at institutions, very diverse in their scope, size and mission.

Findings

No matter how much data is produced in support of the importance of the Humanities to the mission of the undergraduate degree, support continues to decline. Because we are all enmeshed in the sound bite approach, perhaps we can take back the narrative through organizations, social media outlets, but mostly to install presidents as the intellectual leadership of the institution.

Originality/value

The author’s perspectives are those having served a variety of institutions over time in senior-level positions, including vice-presidential support to presidents, but also from the experience of being a university president.

Details

On the Horizon: The International Journal of Learning Futures, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Nicki Pombier

Purpose: This chapter proposes narrative allyship across ability as a practice in which nondisabled researchers work with disabled nonresearchers to co-construct a process that…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter proposes narrative allyship across ability as a practice in which nondisabled researchers work with disabled nonresearchers to co-construct a process that centers and acts on the knowledge contained in and expressed by the lived experience of the disabled nonresearchers. This chapter situates narrative allyship across ability in the landscape of other participatory research practices, with a particular focus on oral history as a social justice praxis.

Approach: In order to explore the potential of this practice, the author outlines and reflects on both the methodology of her oral history graduate thesis work, a narrative project with self-advocates with Down syndrome, and includes and analyzes reflections about narrative allyship from a self-advocate with Down syndrome.

Findings: The author proposes three guiding principles for research as narrative allyship across ability, namely that such research further the interests of narrators as the narrators define them, optimize the autonomy of narrators, and tell stories with, instead of about, narrators.

Implications: This chapter suggests the promise of research praxis as a form of allyship: redressing inequality by addressing power, acknowledging expertise in subjugated knowledges, and connecting research practices to desires for social change or political outcomes. The author models methods by which others might include in their research narrative work across ability and demonstrates the particular value of knowledge produced when researchers attend to the lived expertise of those with disabilities. The practice of narrative allyship across ability has the potential to bring a wide range of experiences and modes of expression into the domains of research, history, policy, and culture that would otherwise exclude them.

Book part
Publication date: 25 April 2014

Sara Delamont and Paul Atkinson

A great deal of contemporary research in education, and in the social sciences more generally, is conducted through interviews. Interview-derived accounts and narratives have been…

Abstract

A great deal of contemporary research in education, and in the social sciences more generally, is conducted through interviews. Interview-derived accounts and narratives have been used as data for many decades. We argue that, despite their popularity and their long history, such data are not always subjected to rigorous analysis. Researchers too often treat interviews as sources of insight about informants’ experiences and feelings, but pay insufficient attention to the forms and functions of such accounts. We argue that they need to be approached through the analytic lens of accounting devices and narrative structures. We exemplify this approach through ‘academic’ narratives: scientists’ discovery accounts and accounts of doctoral supervision. We emphasise how such accounts need to be examined in terms of the discursive construction of reality. Such an approach is an important corrective to the selective reporting of ‘atrocity stories’ about postgraduate education.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research II
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-823-5

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Aviva Bower

This chapter explores queer theory as a “thought of a method” in educational ethnography by sharing stories of two third grade boys and situating them in a discussion of…

Abstract

This chapter explores queer theory as a “thought of a method” in educational ethnography by sharing stories of two third grade boys and situating them in a discussion of Britzman’s ideas about reading and Butler’s notion of fantasy. The stories are presented as a possible queer educational ethnography, in which the ethnographer writes the fantastic narrative of the boys as they read creatively to reveal and unsettle gender and reading as sites of constraint to which other constraints adhere. The boys’ reading itself is a queer reading of these constraints and as such makes alterity visible and possible. The study and the methodological framework suggest that educational ethnographers and other adults who work in schools should become attuned to the markers of constraint and alterity, so as to recognize, shelter, and maintain the alterity that children make possible. The chapter asserts children must be allowed to read for alterity, and shows how fantastic narratives that emerge from such readings are limited by the hushing of individuals who disallow alterity in classrooms. Ultimately, this chapter is relevant to ethnographers of education in that it suggests that queer theory not only is necessary to narrate and thus shelter the ways that gender can and should be unsettled in classrooms, but also allows us to narrate and shelter other queer urgencies related to fear, violence, and vulnerability that children experience or share in classrooms. Implications for the current climate of school reform based on standardization of curriculum are also discussed.

Details

New Directions in Educational Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-623-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Book part
Publication date: 11 October 2019

David Beer

Abstract

Details

The Quirks of Digital Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-916-8

Book part
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Asya Draganova

Abstract

Details

Popular Music in Contemporary Bulgaria: At the Crossroads
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-697-8

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of…

16390

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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