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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Lorman Lundsten, Mary Daugherty, James Shovein, Michael Sullivan, Heino Beckmann and David Vang

The article attempts to determine whether academic research in the area of finance has a direct link to the practitioners in the field.

Abstract

Purpose

The article attempts to determine whether academic research in the area of finance has a direct link to the practitioners in the field.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a survey of over 50 finance practitioners to ask their opinion on the relevance of academic finance journals to their respective jobs.

Findings

The results suggest that most business practitioners are more interested in proprietary research than in generally distributed academic research, the academic peer‐review process seems to reduce the interest of practitioners in academic research due to the time lag between the findings of research and their publication, and the statistical significance of academic research results does not interest practitioners as much as the immediate relevance of the research findings to their respective jobs.

Originality/value

A review of the literature suggests this might be one of the first papers to actually test the hypothesis that academic finance research has a direct transference to the finance industry.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 6 August 2020

Tyler Self

This case was developed from interviews the author held with Nathan Baumeister, the protagonist in the case and Towny CEO; Hannah Franzen, a Towny marketing employee…

Abstract

Research methodology

This case was developed from interviews the author held with Nathan Baumeister, the protagonist in the case and Towny CEO; Hannah Franzen, a Towny marketing employee discussed in the case; and Mallory Franzen, Hannah’s sister-in-law and the company representative for Boomn, the digital marketing agency discussed in the case. In addition, secondary research on the USA retail industry was performed by the author. The case was class-tested four times by the author, with Hannah Franzen and Mallory Franzen initially visiting as case protagonists. This resulted in the case of refinements based on student discussion.

Case overview/synopsis

Towny: A new business model for a mobile economy shares the context and issues surrounding CEO Nathan Baumeister in the spring of 2018 at Towny, a unique business helping local businesses connect with their consumers over mobile devices. The company began going to market based on the vision of its owner and Nathan’s boss, Don Shafer. It had quickly approached local business clients and consumers in five key markets. The purpose of the case is to allow students the opportunity to discuss key new venture creation concepts and scenarios such as customer value proposition, competitive advantage and digital marketing.

Complexity academic level

This case was developed to be used in an undergraduate course in entrepreneurship. The particular course, new venture finance: the entrepreneur’s perspective, teaches the general subject of entrepreneurial finance through financial models such as free cash flow and valuation, case discussions with entrepreneurs visiting as facilitators and protagonists and business concept planning and forecasting. This case helps train students on how to incorporate online marketing costs into their business concept plans. Relevant courses and topics also include small business management and entrepreneurial financial management.

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

B. Pandu Ranga Narasimharao

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the social responsibility of universities and other higher education institutes in meeting the challenges faced by biotechnology…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the social responsibility of universities and other higher education institutes in meeting the challenges faced by biotechnology and human resource development.

Design/methodology/approach

The challenges faced by biotechnology are discussed under three broad heads – exponential growth in biotechnology knowledge, commercialization and industrialization of the biotechnologies, and knowledge integration by various stakeholders of biotechnology.

Findings

The emergence of the knowledge society warrants that universities ensure that overall work of the academy is more relevant to the nation's most pressing civic, social, economic and moral problems and that there is an urgent need to have a fresh look at the approaches followed in biotechnology education and training, particularly with reference to developing countries. It is necessary to see how the different players (industries, university, society, government) concerned with biotechnology can act in unison and in a mutually beneficial way. An integrated approach to the field of biotechnology combining different subject areas is necessary and the courses and approach should reflect this.

Originality/value

Career counselors and those engaged in educational guidance are flooded with inquiries about biotechnology courses and their scope. It is observed, on the one hand, that the biotechnology field is starved of talent and, on the other hand, that there are several universities/colleges, particularly in developing countries, producing large numbers of unemployable graduates. Some serious thinking needs to be done urgently to overcome this problem.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Abu Hamja, Peter Hasle and David Hansen

Lean manufacturing has the potential for simultaneously improving the competitiveness and the social sustainability of the apparel industry in developing countries…

Abstract

Purpose

Lean manufacturing has the potential for simultaneously improving the competitiveness and the social sustainability of the apparel industry in developing countries. However, there is limited research on the ways to a successful lean implementation in developing countries and with an emphasis on occupational health and safety (OHS) improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper investigates four cases of lean implementation in garment factories and uses the design science research strategy, building on the context-intervention-mechanism-outcome (CIMO) framework to identify explanatory mechanisms that can be used for designing future action.

Findings

The study identifies tangible mechanisms that can lead to successful lean implementation. The most important mechanisms relate to practical top management support, worker involvement, application of lean tools and training.

Practical implications

The findings of this study can guide better lean implementation for the many garment factories in developing countries.

Originality/value

While the lean literature provides general recommendations for lean implementation, knowledge about the transfer mechanisms in developing countries as well as the connections between lean and OHS is limited. This paper contributes to lean implementation theory and to the discourse of positive lean by integrating efficiency and working conditions. In addition, the paper identifies transfer mechanisms for lean implementation in the garment industry in a developing country.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2019

Jill Hanley, Nicole Ives, Jaime Lenet, Shawn-Renee Hordyk, Christine Walsh, Sonia Ben Soltane and David Este

This paper presents an analysis of how health intersects with the experience of housing insecurity and homelessness, specifically for migrant women. The authors argue that…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents an analysis of how health intersects with the experience of housing insecurity and homelessness, specifically for migrant women. The authors argue that it is important to understand the specificities of the interplay of these different factors to continue the advancement of our understanding and practice as advocates for health and housing security.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory, qualitative, methodological approach was adopted, using a broad definition of housing insecurity: from absolute homelessness (e.g. residing rough) to invisible homelessness (e.g. couch surfing) to those at risk of homelessness. In total, 26 newcomer (foreign-born women who came to live in Canada during the previous ten years, regardless of their immigration status) women were recruited in Montreal, Canada. Participants were recruited directly through advertisements in public places and in collaboration with community organizations (women’s centers, homeless shelters, crisis centers, domestic violence shelters, immigrant settlement agencies and ethnic associations) and they self-identified as having experienced housing insecurity. Efforts were made to include a diversity of immigrant statuses as well as diversity in ethnicity, race, country of origin, family composition, sexual orientation, age and range of physical and mental ability. Women were engaged in semi-structured, open-ended interviews lasting approximately 1 h. Interviews were conducted in English or French in a location and time of participants’ choosing.

Findings

The findings are presented around three themes: how health problems instigate and maintain migrant women’s housing insecurity and homelessness; ways in which women’s immigration trajectories and legal status may influence their health experiences; and particular coping strategies that migrant women employ in efforts to maintain or manage their health. The authors conclude with implications of these findings for both policy and practice in relation to migrant women who experience or are at risk of housing insecurity and homelessness.

Originality/value

Intersections of women experiencing migration and housing insecurity in Canadian contexts have rarely been examined. This paper addresses a gap in the literature in terms of topic and context, but also in terms of sharing the voices of migrant women with direct experience with housing insecurity.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Celebrating the James Partridge Award: Essays Toward the Development of a More Diverse, Inclusive, and Equitable Field of Library and Information Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-933-9

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2013

Abstract

Details

Collective Efficacy: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on International Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-680-4

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Jiuchang Wei and Yang Liu

– This paper aims to examine the effect of government support on the innovation performance of firms in the Chinese context.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of government support on the innovation performance of firms in the Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

We divided government support into vertical support and horizontal support, and adopted an empirical research approach in this study. We collected the data of 343 enterprises in China that had been identified as innovative enterprises, including their characteristic data, government support data and patent data. Negative binomial regression was used to quantitatively examine the relationship between government support and the innovation performance of firms.

Findings

Both vertical support in the form of direct research and development (R&D) subsidies and horizontal support in the form of regional innovation policy positively influence the innovation performance of firms. In addition, direct R&D subsidies are more likely to experience the enhanced benefits of carrying out tax credit policy on the innovation performance of firms.

Originality/value

This study contributed to the innovation literature by distinguishing two types of government support, namely, vertical support and horizontal support, and assessing the effects of government support on firm innovation in the Chinese context.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Parisa Alizadeh and Reza Salami

The purpose of this paper is to describe the current status of the knowledge-based economy (KBE) in Iran in comparison to Turkey, the challenges encountered and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the current status of the knowledge-based economy (KBE) in Iran in comparison to Turkey, the challenges encountered and the appropriate policies toward Iran’s Outlook 2025 based on which the country is expected to be ranked first in science and technology within the Middle East region.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a descriptive research. The methodology used for this study is qualitative/quantitative secondary research. The method will be used for two main goals. First, we used the World Bank’s Knowledge Assessment Methodology, and the data are mostly collected from secondary sources such as the World Bank’s Development Indicators for Iran and Turkey. Second, desktop research will be used to summarize and synthesize available studies on the consideration of policy-making toward KBE, especially among developing economies.

Findings

The paper provides policy considerations around four pillars: information and communications technology (ICT), innovation system, education and human resources development and economic incentives and institutional regime. It suggests that regarding ICT indicators, Iran has to join international programs to attract senior public authorities’ involvement and accountability. Regarding its innovation system, lessons for policymakers are implementing development plans and coordinating science and technology policies in the country. Moreover, the quality of education, in-company training, post-secondary technical education and scientific and technological workforce need to be improved. Finally, considering the weak macroeconomic circumstances, legislative measures are needed in addition to, establishing a promotion agency for foreign direct investment to coordinate the inflow and to grant incentives for attracting more investment.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen research approach, the research results have not been confirmed by an experts group. Therefore, using some group decision-making methods, such as panel of experts, could be proposed to further test the findings.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for public policymakers, especially in developing countries, and for moving toward a KBE.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an identified need to learn from similar countries experiences in policymaking about the same problem.

Details

Journal of Science & Technology Policy Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Benjamin Stuart Rodney Farr-Wharton, Kerry Brown, Robyn Keast and Yuliya Shymko

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of organisational business acumen and social network structure on the earnings and labour precarity experienced by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of organisational business acumen and social network structure on the earnings and labour precarity experienced by creative industry workers.

Design/methodology/approach

Results from a survey that collected data from a random sample of 289 creative workers are analysed using structural equation modelling. Mediating effects of social network structure are explored.

Findings

Results support the qualitative findings of Crombie and Hagoort (2010) who claim that organisational business acumen is a significant enabler for creative workers. Further, social network structure has a partial mediating effect in mitigating labour precarity.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory study is novel in its use of a quantitative approach to understand the relationship between labour and social network dynamics of the creative industries. For this reason, developed scales, while robust in exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, warrant further application and maturity.

Practical implications

The organisational business acumen of creative workers is found to mitigate labour precarity and increase perceived earnings.

Social implications

The results from this study call for policy and management shifts, to focus attention on developing business proficiency of creative workers, in an effort to curb labour precarity in the creative industries, and enhance positive spillovers into other sectors.

Originality/value

The paper fills a gap in knowledge regarding the impact of organisational business acumen and social network structure on the pay and working conditions of people working in a sector that is dominated by self-employed and freelance arrangements.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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