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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Nathan O'Donoghue and David T. Croasdell

This paper aims to examine ways in which multinational enterprises (MNEs) can secure knowledge assets across global operations.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine ways in which multinational enterprises (MNEs) can secure knowledge assets across global operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports the results of a comparative case study. The practices of four MNEs are considered in conjunction with practices identified in the literature. A comparative company analysis is conducted using the resource‐based view of the firm.

Findings

The paper principally concludes that MNEs have several options for protecting knowledge assets. A set of seven recommendations are derived from the analysis.

Practical implications

The recommendations derived from the analysis could be beneficial for enterprises who do knowledge work in global settings.

Originality/value

The paper offers background and consideration for those companies with IP in global business environments. The background, analysis and recommendations add to the body of knowledge in this area.

Details

VINE, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Murray E. Jennex, Stefan Smolnik and David T. Croasdell

The purpose of this paper is to propose a definition of KMS success.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a definition of KMS success.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a consensus‐building approach to derive the definition. An expert panel was used to generate a list of possible KM success definitions. A survey was used to identify a likely definition from this list. A second survey was used to further refine the proposed KM success definition. Finally, analysis of the survey comments was used to finalize the proposed definition.

Findings

KM success is a multidimensional concept. It is defined by capturing the right knowledge, getting the right knowledge to the right user, and using this knowledge to improve organizational and/or individual performance. KM success is measured by means of the dimensions: impact on business processes, impact on strategy, leadership, and knowledge content.

Research limitations/implications

An additional survey should be performed that tests the constructs of the proposed KM success definition. Additionally, future research should focus on identifying a set of measures that can be used to measure KM success and determining whether KM and KM System (KMS), success are the same or different constructs.

Practical implications

The proposed definition of KM success provides practitioners with four dimensions that can be used to construct organization‐specific measures for indicating when their KM initiative is successful.

Originality/value

This is important, as the literature, while providing much support for identifying KM critical success factors, does not provide a definition of when KM can be considered successful. Knowing when a KM initiative is successful is important for organizations and practitioners.

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

David Croasdell, Alexander McLeod and Mark G. Simkin

Increasing enrollments in colleges of business have not been matched by women majoring in the field of information systems (IS). This paper aims to explore reasons why…

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Abstract

Purpose

Increasing enrollments in colleges of business have not been matched by women majoring in the field of information systems (IS). This paper aims to explore reasons why women choose not to major in information technology disciplines and to suggest potential solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a behavioral model based on the theory of reasoned action and a survey of the students enrolled in six sections of a college‐wide MIS course to help them answer the fundamental question “Why don't more women major in information systems?” They also used partial least squares analysis to estimate the parameters of the model and the results of several open‐ended survey questions to validate their statistical findings, leading to a richer triangulation of study results.

Findings

The study found that a “genuine interest in IS” and the “influence of family” most account for a woman's decision to major in information systems. Equally important are those items that did not appear to attract females, including such matters as “job‐related factors” or the “influence of fellow students or friends”. These findings have important recruitment and retention implications as well as suggesting some avenues for further study.

Originality/value

The analyses suggest that there is much faculty and business recruiters can do to encourage more females to major in IT‐related disciplines. One is to encourage women to develop more interest in the field. Another is to create more study options for women with hard‐science talents who want to pursue technologically‐intensive careers. Finally, teachers, academic institutions, and employers might find it useful to address some of the misconceptions that women might have about IT‐related jobs – for example, that IT jobs are only for males or computer geeks – and stress the many positive dimensions of IT career paths.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2022

Xin He, Xia Wu, David Croasdell and Yanhai Zhao

The investigation of organization's ambidextrous innovation is a challenge in the research studies of management sciences. As existent literature showed a positive…

Abstract

Purpose

The investigation of organization's ambidextrous innovation is a challenge in the research studies of management sciences. As existent literature showed a positive relation between dynamic capability (DC) and innovation, few empirical studies are conducted to explain how DC impacts on the balanced and combined dimension of ambidexterity and still less on how social network moderates this relation. As a result, this paper aims to investigate and provide empirical evidence on DC’s influence on ambidexterity in the context of China.

Design/methodology/approach

By a relational model of DC, ambidextrous innovation and social network, this study has conducted multiple regression analysis on the data collected from 350 small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in mainland China.

Findings

The results show that, DC has positive influence on both the combined and balanced dimension of ambidexterity; and both the relational network and structural network play an inverted U moderating role, where the moderation of relational network is stronger than that of structural network.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical support on DC's influence on ambidexterity together with the moderation of social network.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1922

In his mycological observations Browne isolated and studied the inverting power of torulae and two Monilia (named “nigra” and “fusca,” respectively). The presence of fungi…

Abstract

In his mycological observations Browne isolated and studied the inverting power of torulae and two Monilia (named “nigra” and “fusca,” respectively). The presence of fungi such as Penicillium was noted and their possible importance emphasized. Some interesting points were made with regard to sources of infection and consequent prevention of deterioration of raw cane sugars. These advances by Owen and Browne have apparently initiated the return of interest to the molds, and the recent work of Amons, Blake, the Kopeloffs, Church, and van der Bijl has dealt with some aspect of the activity of molds in sugar.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 24 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1951

The controls and queues of the past eleven years have confirmed and consolidated, I think, the conservatism of the British housewife in the matter of buying food. Butter…

Abstract

The controls and queues of the past eleven years have confirmed and consolidated, I think, the conservatism of the British housewife in the matter of buying food. Butter is just national butter. Margarine is what the Minister of Food dictates. Cooking fat is—well, just cooking fat. Those who succumbed to the official boosting of whalemeat, snoek and brisling mostly wish that they had not. Those who were adventurous enough to spend 5s. or 6s. on cans of imported food labelled —apparently with the Minister's approval—with the words “ Sausages in brine ”, discovered that they had about 11 ounces of sausages in a pint or more of salt water. Could anything be more destructive of willingness to try something new? I am led to make these banal observations by what is happening in this country in the matter of quick‐frosted foods. There is now a National Association of wholesale distributors of these products, which is resolved to try to overcome, by suitable propaganda, the sales‐resistance of the British housewife; and, as a mere looker‐on, I wish them well. Close to my house, in a London suburb, I notice that quick‐frosted fruits and vegetables are on sale at the shops of a dairy firm, a grocer, a provision dealer and a fruiterer (all these are multiple shops), and also at a health food store. Some of the largest firms, including the Unilever mammoth, are now in this business, which is operated on a colossal scale in the United States. It would be boring to give many figures, but I learn that on January 1st, 1949, the stocks of these frozen foods in American warehouses, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, were as under: —

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 53 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Rene Kaiser, Stefan Thalmann and Viktoria Pammer-Schindler

This paper aims to report an interview study investigating knowledge protection practices in a collaborative research and innovation project centred around the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report an interview study investigating knowledge protection practices in a collaborative research and innovation project centred around the semi-conductor industry. The authors explore which and how knowledge protection practices are applied and zoom in on a particular one to investigate the perspective of three stakeholders which collaborate: the SUPPLIER of a specialised machine, the APPLIER of this machine and a SCHOLAR who collaborates with both, in an effort to develop a grey-box model of the machine and its operation.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 33 interviews have been conducted in two rounds: 30 interviews explore knowledge protection practices applied across a large project. Qualitative content analysis is applied to determine practices not well covered by the research community. A total of three follow-up interviews inspect one specific collaboration case of three partners. Quotes from all interviews are used to illustrate the participants’ viewpoints and motivation.

Findings

SCHOLAR and APPLIER communicate using a data-centric knowledge protection practice, in that concrete parameter values are sensitive and hidden by communicating data within a wider parameter range. This practice balances the benefit that all three stakeholders have from communicating about specifics of machine design and operations. The grey-box model combines engineering knowledge of both SUPPLIER and APPLIER.

Practical implications

The line of thought described in this study is applicable to comparable collaboration constellations of a SUPPLIER of a machine, an APPLIER of a machine and a SCHOLAR who analyses and draws insights out of data.

Originality/value

The paper fills a research gap by reporting on applied knowledge protection practices and characterising a data-centric knowledge protection practice around a grey-box model.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 51 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 December 2017

Satyendra C. Pandey, Andrew Dutta and Amar KJR Nayak

The aim of this paper is to understand the role of organizational capabilities in knowledge management (KM) success pattern and how KM initiatives can be designed for…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to understand the role of organizational capabilities in knowledge management (KM) success pattern and how KM initiatives can be designed for organizational success.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted a qualitative, descriptive case study research design to study the complex contextual issue of organizational capabilities and its role in KM success of information technology companies.

Findings

Findings of the study indicate that success of KM is not only bound by its processes but also by key infrastructure which can either promote or inhibit KM. To realize KM success, infrastructure capabilities have to be supported by knowledge process capabilities and vice versa.

Research limitations/implications

Future research can continue to examine organizational capabilities from the perspective of teams or business units in contrast to the organization.

Originality/value

This paper adds valuable empirical insights from Indian standpoint to the existing KM literature concerning preconditions of success and failure of KM initiatives in companies.

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Syahrul Nizam Kamaruzzaman, Emma Marinie Ahmad Zawawi, Muhaimin Ooyub Shafie and Siti Nur Aishah Mohd Noor

– This paper aims to assess the readiness of Malaysian facilities management (FM) organizations in implementing knowledge management (KM) systems.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the readiness of Malaysian facilities management (FM) organizations in implementing knowledge management (KM) systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The questionnaire survey was used to retrieve information on the readiness of FM organizations in Malaysia.

Findings

The findings reveal that, although many FM organizations were capable and ready in terms of information technology, lack of human behaviour and organizational policy is still seen. Technology, policy and human behaviour are the factors that have a strong influence on the successful outcome of KM.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study in implementing KM systems.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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