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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Nicki Pombier

Purpose: This chapter proposes narrative allyship across ability as a practice in which nondisabled researchers work with disabled nonresearchers to co-construct a process…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter proposes narrative allyship across ability as a practice in which nondisabled researchers work with disabled nonresearchers to co-construct a process that centers and acts on the knowledge contained in and expressed by the lived experience of the disabled nonresearchers. This chapter situates narrative allyship across ability in the landscape of other participatory research practices, with a particular focus on oral history as a social justice praxis.

Approach: In order to explore the potential of this practice, the author outlines and reflects on both the methodology of her oral history graduate thesis work, a narrative project with self-advocates with Down syndrome, and includes and analyzes reflections about narrative allyship from a self-advocate with Down syndrome.

Findings: The author proposes three guiding principles for research as narrative allyship across ability, namely that such research further the interests of narrators as the narrators define them, optimize the autonomy of narrators, and tell stories with, instead of about, narrators.

Implications: This chapter suggests the promise of research praxis as a form of allyship: redressing inequality by addressing power, acknowledging expertise in subjugated knowledges, and connecting research practices to desires for social change or political outcomes. The author models methods by which others might include in their research narrative work across ability and demonstrates the particular value of knowledge produced when researchers attend to the lived expertise of those with disabilities. The practice of narrative allyship across ability has the potential to bring a wide range of experiences and modes of expression into the domains of research, history, policy, and culture that would otherwise exclude them.

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

David G. Taylor and David Strutton

The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how Facebook usage is positively related to envy and narcissism, which in turn increase users’ desire for self-promotion and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how Facebook usage is positively related to envy and narcissism, which in turn increase users’ desire for self-promotion and propensity to engage in conspicuous consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via an online survey, with 674 usable responses collected from Facebook users of all ages.

Findings

The results support the hypotheses that increased Facebook usage is positively related to envy and narcissism. These two psychological constructs lead to stronger desires for self-promotion, spurring the behavioral response of conspicuous online consumption.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to the self-reported behaviors of a limited sample. Despite the limitations, the findings identify a process by which increased Facebook usage results in an increased desire to promote oneself through conspicuous consumption.

Practical implications

An understanding of the psychology linking social media use to conspicuous consumption can aid managers in developing marketing strategies to encourage the purchase and usage of positional goods. Specifically, more frequent users may be targeted by advertisers wishing to encourage the purchase and display of their products.

Social implications

Facebook usage appears to elicit emotions – such as narcissism and envy – that most researchers would consider socially undesirable.

Originality/value

An emerging stream of research suggests that social media usage elicits both positive self-comparisons with others (i.e. narcissism) and negative (i.e. envy). This study is among the first to empirically test this effect on the purchase and consumption of positional goods.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Peter R. Whipp and Richard Pengelley

The “Colleague Review of Teaching” programme (CRT) aimed to enhance reviewees’ confidence to teach. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Abstract

Purpose

The “Colleague Review of Teaching” programme (CRT) aimed to enhance reviewees’ confidence to teach. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies using mixed-method, interview and questionnaire, repeated measures intervention were employed whereby academics in an Australian university science faculty volunteered to participate in a multi-faceted teaching review programme. Underpinned by confidence and self-determination theory, the CRT included peer coach training, reviewee choice, and a strengths-based approach to peer reviewing and coaching colleagues.

Findings

The reviewees declared an enhanced confidence to teach, teaching skills and unit design knowledge in an environment that was supportive of psychological needs. The peer coaches reported the CRT to be a positive experience that should continue. The strengths-based approach to peer observation of teaching and peer coaching facilitated department collegiality and was positively received by all participants who completed the programme.

Research limitations/implications

The indifferent response to the CRT protocol completion reconfirms that peer review is a complex science and needs careful negotiation.

Practical implications

Review, peer coach and mentor training, review practice, choice protocols and the multi-faceted approach (pre-observation meeting, observations, written report and post-observation meeting) were positively received.

Originality/value

This paper provides rich insight into the experiences of a teaching review process.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

David Leece

The article assesses the direct and indirect impactof a major redundancy on local unemployment.The extent of these effects depends on the wayin which the local labour…

Abstract

The article assesses the direct and indirect impact of a major redundancy on local unemployment. The extent of these effects depends on the way in which the local labour market adjusts. Two hypotheses are considered. (1) that the redundant workers displaced other labour market participants from work; and (2) that self‐employment assisted the process of labour market adjustment and, therefore, reduced both the direct and indirect effects of the redundancy on unemployment. The data for the research are taken from a survey of workers made redundant, in May 1985, from the Michelin tyre company based in Stoke‐on‐Trent, England. The results suggest that displacement took place in the manufacturing sector of the local economy, but that self‐employment was important in easing the “dynamic” adjustment of the post‐redundancy labour market. Policy makers should recognise that a part of the adjustment process is the use of self‐employment as a temporary employment state.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 October 2008

Jeffrey E. Nash

Through a critical viewing of All in the Family and Curb Your Enthusiasm, significant shifts in popular conceptions of racialized others can be identified. All in the…

Abstract

Through a critical viewing of All in the Family and Curb Your Enthusiasm, significant shifts in popular conceptions of racialized others can be identified. All in the Family, represented by the character Archie Bunker, and Curb Your Enthusiasm, represented by Larry David, are deconstructed and contrasted to represent distinct eras in the portrayal of race relationships. All in the Family takes a sanctimonious and judgmental stance toward prejudice that embodies a simplistic conception of race humanized through the defects of Archie Bunker. Curb Your Enthusiasm, in contrast, offers a complex conception of racialized relationships, humanized by the character of Larry David. Comparisons of the two portrayals suggest that (1) conceptions of race have shifted from fixed, definitional and “individualized” contents toward situational, fluid, and ironic ones, (2) this shift parallels transformations in society, and (3) sarcastic and framed narratives of the consequences of interracial relationships and race prejudice have displaced optimistic and challenging portrayals. For their respective eras, each program reflects conceptions of race in popular consciousness.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-127-5

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Cindy B. Rippé, Brent Smith and Suri Weisfeld-Spolter

This paper aims to enhance current understanding of motivations for self-gifting by suggesting that an individual’s attachment state from childhood upbringing impacts self

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to enhance current understanding of motivations for self-gifting by suggesting that an individual’s attachment state from childhood upbringing impacts self-gifting behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to 301 consumers living in the USA. Results were analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

Findings reveal that insecure anxious and insecure avoidant individuals are inclined to self-gift for reward and as compensation for personal disappointment.

Practical implications

Retailers can leverage the results to customize promotional messages that reference self-gifting in relation to an individual’s attachment style. For example, messaging geared towards attachment avoidance might emphasize acceptance of one’s imperfect self and situation. Messaging with sensitivity to attachment anxiety might emphasize positive self-reflection and self-worth. Per the authors’ findings, a promotional message geared towards attachment style may better motivate self-gifting.

Originality/value

This research is the first known empirical research to specify a psychological antecedent of self-gifting behavior, which is an emerging area in the literature and retail environment. The findings explain nuances of self-gifting behavior by theoretically connecting insecure attachment style as a driver of self-gifting purchases for reward and personal disappointment.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1990

Leslie Armour

Socialism is in trouble, but some serious problems which provokedsocialist theory remain. These do not have to do so much with the classwar – which is remediable – as with…

Abstract

Socialism is in trouble, but some serious problems which provoked socialist theory remain. These do not have to do so much with the class war – which is remediable – as with the difficulties of establishing and maintaining an effective “social self” in an economic system which does not distinguish clearly enough between property as a means of self‐expression and property as a reward for performing social tasks, and which does not effectively deal with the tension between public and private property. These difficulties go back to David Hume as well as to Adam Smith and some clues to a solution left by T.H. Green, Hume′s nineteenth century editor, as well as by P.J. Proudhon, are developed.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 17 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2008

Andrew Clark, Nathalie Colombier and David Masclet

It is known that the self‐employed are generally more satisfied than salaried workers. The aim of this paper is to test whether this phenomenon is particularly found for…

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Abstract

Purpose

It is known that the self‐employed are generally more satisfied than salaried workers. The aim of this paper is to test whether this phenomenon is particularly found for the first‐generation self‐employed.

Design/methodology/approach

French and British panel data are analysed, which include information on various measures of job satisfaction, and the respondent's parents' occupation. Job satisfaction regressions were run in which the first‐ and second‐generation self‐employed were distinguished between.

Findings

The study finds that first‐generation self‐employed (those whose parents were not self‐employed) are more satisfied overall than are the second‐generation self‐employed. The findings are consistent between the British and French data.

Research limitations/implications

While the results are the same in the two countries considered, further validation work should extend the analysis across countries. While the authors are fairly sure that the second‐generation self‐employed do worse, they cannot precisely distinguish between comparison to one's parents, constrained occupational choice, and selection effects due to lower barriers to self‐employment entry.

Originality/value

The authors believe that this is one of the first papers to distinguish between types of self‐employed in terms of their higher satisfaction. The finding that parents' labour force status continues to have a significant impact on their children's job satisfaction argues for a more systematic consideration of intergenerational factors in the analysis of labour markets.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Kay Sidebottom and David Ball

Further Education in England today is over-regulated, over-inspected, and has suffered from an increasingly interventionist government agenda. Trainee teachers entering…

Abstract

Further Education in England today is over-regulated, over-inspected, and has suffered from an increasingly interventionist government agenda. Trainee teachers entering the sector are required to undertake regular reflective work, traditionally in the form of a written journal. However, where trainees use creative methods for reflection, such as stories, films, drawings, photography, and models, greater “reflexivity” and connection of theory to practice become apparent. This led me, as a teacher-educator, to inquire further into our practice, examining the impact that creative reflective expression might have on the teachers themselves, their resilience, and their ability to subvert the oppressions of the current education system. Drawing on a collaborative inquiry between myself as teacher-educator, and student/colleague David Ball, this chapter recounts the story of a year of experimentation through the coming together of a student-teacher artistic assemblage which pushed the boundaries of our teacher training curriculum and formal notions of “research”. We found that we moved in new configurations of “teacher-artist”, “student-curator”, and “audience-class” towards a notion of ourselves of “cosmic artisans” (Delueuze and Guattari, 1987) to share with the world our painful, emergent and embodied experiences of “becoming teacher”.

Details

Decentering the Researcher in Intimate Scholarship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-636-3

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Matthew P. Eddy

A growing number of human rights NGOs have placed international volunteers in conflict zones from Guatemala and Colombia to Palestine and Iraq. This study samples from…

Abstract

A growing number of human rights NGOs have placed international volunteers in conflict zones from Guatemala and Colombia to Palestine and Iraq. This study samples from contemporary high-risk transnational activists and highlights the variation in biographical steps taken toward the shared outcome of participation in human rights work (HRW). Data was collected through 6 weeks of participant observation in Israel-Palestine, 21 in-depth interviews, and 28 shorter focused interviews with human rights workers (N=49). Oversampling from the International Solidarity Movement reveals how the unique constraints and opportunities presented by a particular conflict zone and NGO culture impacts self-selection into HRW. Grounded theory and Boolean methodology aided in identifying four main pathways (the nonviolent activist, peace church, anarchist, and solidarity pathways) to HRW as well as biographical patterns and complexities that have been underemphasized in the existing literature. These include the salience of transformative events and attitude changes in the process of constructing a cosmopolitan identity and committing to high-risk transnational activism.

Details

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-609-7

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