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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

David Seedhouse

Mental health promotion is saturated with theoretical ambiguity and is ripe for sustained philosophical investigation. Unfortunately, most philosophical discussion in…

Abstract

Mental health promotion is saturated with theoretical ambiguity and is ripe for sustained philosophical investigation. Unfortunately, most philosophical discussion in health promotion is commonplace rather than academic, and many health promotion theorists are unaware that there is a difference. In order to illustrate this intransigent problem, I discuss Glenn MacDonald's recent contribution to this journal (Vol. 1, Issue 2). In so doing I demonstrate four philosophical errors frequently made in health promotion theory, research and practice.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2020

Ann Gallagher

Abstract

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Slow Ethics and the Art of Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-195-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Michael Murray

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Tony Bayer, Win Tadd and Stefan Krajcik

This paper reports the findings of 89 focus groups and 18 individual interviews (involving 391 older people in 6 European countries) that were held to explore how older…

Abstract

This paper reports the findings of 89 focus groups and 18 individual interviews (involving 391 older people in 6 European countries) that were held to explore how older people view human dignity in their lives. Participants were all aged over 60 years and 25% were aged 80+ years. They were from a range of educational, social and economic backgrounds. 72% were women and 17% were living in residential or nursing homes.There was substantial agreement about the meaning and experience of dignity in older people's everyday lives. It was seen as a highly relevant and important concept, enhancing self‐esteem, self‐worth and well‐being. Three major themes were identified: respect and recognition; participation and involvement; and dignity in care.The theoretical model of human dignity developed in the project was reflected in many of the findings from the empirical data. Of particular importance and relevance was the notion of ‘dignity of personal identity’, not least because it is perhaps most vulnerable to the actions of others. Menschenwurde (expressed as the innate dignity of human beings) was also important.For dignity of older people to be enhanced, communication issues, privacy, personal identity and feelings of vulnerability need to be addressed. Education of all professionals should pay attention to practices that enhance or detract from the experience of dignity. Policies and standards need to go beyond the merely mechanistic and easily quantifiable, to identify meaningful qualitative indicators of dignity in care.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Michael Keaney

The British National Health Service (NHS) has experienced various phases of reform and reorganisation during the last 15 years. During this time it has been suggested that…

Abstract

The British National Health Service (NHS) has experienced various phases of reform and reorganisation during the last 15 years. During this time it has been suggested that the role of the patient is analogous to that of the consumer. Meanwhile there has been increasing application of the techniques of health economics. This paper examines the rationale for these developments, placing them in wide historial context, and arguing that far from being a passive consumer of pre‐packed healthcare, patients ought to be considered as partners in a continuing process of inquiry, in accordance with John Dewey’s philosophy of instrumentalism. As a result it is argued that the present commodification of healthcare in the UK should be halted, in order to preserve and build on the achievements of the NHS.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Dave Wilson

This paper looks at professional and philosophical concerns about intentional deception and lies by professionals to clients. The implications for forensic practice are discussed.

Abstract

This paper looks at professional and philosophical concerns about intentional deception and lies by professionals to clients. The implications for forensic practice are discussed.

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Sandra Carlisle and Phil Hanlon

This paper brings together evidence and theories from a number of disciplines and thinkers that highlight multiple, sometimes incommensurable understandings about…

Abstract

This paper brings together evidence and theories from a number of disciplines and thinkers that highlight multiple, sometimes incommensurable understandings about well‐being. We identify three broad strands or themes within the literature(s) that frame both the nature of the problem and its potential solutions in different ways. The first strand can be categorised as the ‘hard’ science of wellbeing and its stagnation or decline in modern western society. In a second strand, social and political theory suggests that conceptualisations of well‐being are shaped by aspects of western culture, often in line with the demands of a capitalist economic system. A third theme pursues the critique of consumer culture's influence on well‐being but in the context of broader human problems. This approach draws on ecology, ethics, philosophy and much else to suggest that we urgently need to reconsider what it means to be human, if we are to survive and thrive. Although no uncontroversial solutions are found within any of these themes, all play a necessary part in contributing to knowledge of this complex territory, where assumptions about the nature of the human condition come into question.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1971

At each New Year we stand at the threshold of fresh scenes and hopes, of opportunities and pastures new. It is the time for casting off shackles and burdens that have…

Abstract

At each New Year we stand at the threshold of fresh scenes and hopes, of opportunities and pastures new. It is the time for casting off shackles and burdens that have weighed us down in the old year; almost a new chapter of life. We scan the prevailing scene for signs that will chart the year's unrolling and beyond, and hope profoundly for a smooth passage. The present is largely the product of the past, but of the future, who knows? Man therefore forever seems to be entering upon something new—a change, a challenge, events of great portent. This, of course, is what life is all about. Trends usually precede events, often by a decade or more, yet it is a paradox that so many are taken by surprise when they occur. Trends there have been and well marked; signs, too, for the discerning. In fields particular, they portend overall progress; in general, not a few bode ill.

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British Food Journal, vol. 73 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

At the Royal Society of Health annual conference, no less a person than the editor of the B.M.A.'s “Family Doctor” publications, speaking of the failure of the…

Abstract

At the Royal Society of Health annual conference, no less a person than the editor of the B.M.A.'s “Family Doctor” publications, speaking of the failure of the anti‐smoking campaign, said we “had to accept that health education did not work”; viewing the difficulties in food hygiene, there are many enthusiasts in public health who must be thinking the same thing. Dr Trevor Weston said people read and believed what the health educationists propounded, but this did not make them change their behaviour. In the early days of its conception, too much was undoubtedly expected from health education. It was one of those plans and schemes, part of the bright, new world which emerged in the heady period which followed the carnage of the Great War; perhaps one form of expressing relief that at long last it was all over. It was a time for rebuilding—housing, nutritional and living standards; as the politicians of the day were saying, you cannot build democracy—hadn't the world just been made “safe for democracy?”—on an empty belly and life in a hovel. People knew little or nothing about health or how to safeguard it; health education seemed right and proper at this time. There were few such conceptions in France which had suffered appalling losses; the poilu who had survived wanted only to return to his fields and womenfolk, satisfied that Marianne would take revenge and exact massive retribution from the Boche!

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British Food Journal, vol. 75 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Rowland Worlu, Oladele Joseph Kehinde and Taiye Tairat Borishade

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to introduce the concept of customer experience management (CEM) as a supportive construct in customer loyalty building. In support…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to introduce the concept of customer experience management (CEM) as a supportive construct in customer loyalty building. In support of Smith and Wheeler (2002) stance, Cronin (2003) argued that organizations should deviate from outdated quality → value → satisfaction → loyalty paradigm to a modern and more flexible paradigm for loyalty building.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an archival survey of the extant literature to confirm or debunk the position of CEM protagonists within the context of the health-care sector of developing countries, especially Nigeria.

Findings

This paper presents a new conceptualization on CEM that includes three dimensions of CEM (functional clues, mechanic clues and humanic clues) on customer loyalty in the health-care sector of Nigeria. Therefore, when a health-care organization consciously and effectively makes CEM a strategic priority, it largely leaves a long-lasting impression in the mind of the customers, which invariably retain and build customer loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

The authors emphasized the importance of how CEM can be used to build loyalty and the need to properly adapt CEM approach in an extremely sensitive service sector, i.e. the health-care sector in developing countries, especially Nigeria. The recommended framework initiates fresh streams of researches for the concept to be carried out empirically in developing countries.

Practical implications

To retain and build customer loyalty, particularly in the health-care sector of Nigeria, health-care organizations need to understand and adopt CEM clues so as to keep customers loyal in an extremely sensitive service sector.

Originality/value

Although there are studies on CEM and customer loyalty in the health-care sector of developed countries, research on CEM is very limited in developing countries such as Nigeria. By contributing to the body of knowledge in this area, this research adds significant value. Moreover, the research gives important information on the Nigerian health-care sector, which probably new to several readers.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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