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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2021

David S. Waller and Helen J. Waller

In recent years, there has been a “heritagisation” of pop culture, including music, whereby cultural institutions, such as galleries and museums in primarily Western…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, there has been a “heritagisation” of pop culture, including music, whereby cultural institutions, such as galleries and museums in primarily Western countries, have run exhibitions based on pop culture to successfully market to a new audience of visitors. The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore the issue of the “heritagisation” of pop culture by museums and observe visitor response to a specific music-related exhibition, linking intangible and tangible elements of the exhibition to provide a framework to understand the visitor experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose will be achieved by observing the “heritagisation” of pop culture in the literature and past exhibitions, proposing how cultural institutions have linked the intangible and tangible elements of music in pop culture for an exhibition and observe visitors' feedback from online comments posted on Tripadvisor undertaken during the original “David Bowie is” exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), London.

Findings

From the Leximancer analysis, a new conceptual framework for visitor experience at an exhibition was developed, which contains three visitor-related categories: pre-exhibition, exhibition space and exhibition experience, with five themes (tickets, exhibition, displayed objects, David Bowie and visitors) and 41 text concepts.

Practical implications

For cultural institutions the implications are that there can be opportunities to curate exhibitions on pop culture or music-related themes, which can include intangible and tangible elements, such as songs, videos, tickets, costumes, musical instruments and posters. These exhibitions can also explore the changing socio/political/historical/cultural background that contextualises pop cultural history.

Originality/value

This theory-building study advances the body of knowledge as it links music in pop culture and cultural institutions, specifically in this case a highly successful music-related exhibition at a museum, and provides a theoretical model based on tangibility elements. Further, it analyses museum visitor comments by using the qualitative software program, Leximancer, to develop a new conceptual framework for visitor experience.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

David S. Waller and Michael J. Polonsky

Implicit in the traditional model of communication is the assumption that an individual or organization sends a single message to one receiver, or class of receivers…

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2244

Abstract

Implicit in the traditional model of communication is the assumption that an individual or organization sends a single message to one receiver, or class of receivers. However, in practice there are often multiple senders, targeted receivers and even messages. This paper proposes expanding the traditional model of communication to include these additional facets and thus make the model more representative of business communication.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2018

Helen J. Waller and David S. Waller

The purpose of this paper is to observe the nature of documentation and the description used in object biographies by an auction house catalogue and an online museum…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to observe the nature of documentation and the description used in object biographies by an auction house catalogue and an online museum collection database in relation opera costumes. This research aims to discuss the issues of cultural and economic value in relation to objects in the art world, and examine examples of object biographies for opera costumes that are sold at an auction and exhibited in a museum.

Design/methodology/approach

The object biographies are compared from an auction house catalogue and the online museum collection database, based on two factors: costumes worn by a famous singer and costumes designed by a famous designer.

Findings

This study identified the valuation methods of auction houses and museums, including accounting for the market value and fair value, as well as social and cultural values. The nature of the documentation also clearly shows the different purpose of the object biographies. For auction houses the biography needs to be short and specific as it provides sufficient information and is read out at the auction, while art catalogues can also be used by experts as part of the conversation to understanding heritage value, and will also be viewed and used by researchers, investors, other auction house specialists and art world professionals.

Research limitations/implications

By comparing two institutions, auction houses and museums, this study has shown that the information that is documented and how it is presented in object biographies is determined by the goals of the institutions. These goals may vary or overlap in providing information, demonstrating cultural importance, to be spoken allowed to an audience and make sales, or to educate, conserve and preserve.

Practical implications

This study shows that to some extent museum online databases display their collection removed from cultural context, with an isolated image of the item, and in an organised, digitally accessible manner. A potential implication is that museums should not only digitally catalogue an item, but also provide discussion and the cultural background and significance of the item.

Social implications

Auction catalogues are written for a specific event (the auction), while the online museum collection database is meant to be a permanent record, which aims to digitally preserve objects and provide access to images and information to a general audience, and further could be edited with amendments or new information when future research or events lead to potential updates.

Originality/value

This study adds to the discourse on approaches to the understanding of costumes as an art object of significance and their potential cultural, economic and heritage value, particularly as represented in the documentation of object biographies.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 74 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2019

Xin-Jean Lim, Jun-Hwa Cheah, David S. Waller, Hiram Ting and Siew Imm Ng

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of social commerce (s-commerce) cues (i.e. trust, compatibility, reliability and responsiveness) on repurchase intention…

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1429

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of social commerce (s-commerce) cues (i.e. trust, compatibility, reliability and responsiveness) on repurchase intention in apparel s-commerce along with the mediating effect of customer engagement and the moderating effect of s-commerce navigation.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the purposive sampling technique, face-to-face survey was administered to Gen-Y social media users in Malaysia. Subsequently, 384 respondents were sampled. Partial least squares-structural equation modeling was used to perform the analyses.

Findings

S-commerce cues have a positive effect on customer engagement, which in turn leads to repurchase intention of apparel among Gen-Y. Particularly, customer engagement also mediates the relationship between s-commerce cues and repurchase intention. S-commerce navigation is found to moderate the effect of engagement on repurchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are derived from the perception of Gen-Y in Malaysia and do not represent the entire population. Future research could investigate the same phenomena across generations and consider heterogeneity issues to provide more insights.

Practical implications

Apparel s-commerce retailers are suggested to engage with customers more in the e-retail environment to build a lasting relationship. Contextual factors such as ease of navigation should be observed to enhance the desired response of diverse customers today.

Originality/value

This study adds to the growing body of knowledge on relationship marketing by assessing the impact of customer engagement and navigation on the relationships between s-commerce cues and repurchase intention in the contemporary setting.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Robert B. Ellis and David S. Waller

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the early days of marketing education by observing the first “Marketing” subject in Australia, which was taught at the University…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the early days of marketing education by observing the first “Marketing” subject in Australia, which was taught at the University of Melbourne, and comparing elements of the early subject to the introductory Marketing subject of today.

Design/methodology/approach

The information used for this study was obtained from material in the University of Melbourne Archives, including calendar entries, subject descriptions, and university announcements, as well as from interviews and correspondence with various people including those in academic and administrative positions, and former students.

Findings

The origins of university-level marketing education in Australia can be seen to have been shaped by several influences, including: the external environment of the country at that time; the areas of interest of academic staff; the availability of teaching material – textbooks, academic articles, appropriate case studies, academic research papers, etc.; the academic staff and teaching materials from the USA; and the extent to which the supporting technology of marketing had changed.

Practical implications

By observing the development in marketing education over the years, from its beginnings in Australia at the University of Melbourne, this paper shows changes in the content which assists in the understanding of what has led to how marketing is taught in Australasian universities and colleges today.

Originality/value

Marketing education research usually focusses on what is happening at the moment, so the value of this study is that it is one of the few that looks at marketing education from a historical perspective.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

David S. Waller and Kim Shyan Fam

Considers the environmental differences that may need to be considered when marketers enter into a new country such as media restrictions. Cultural and legal factors…

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6680

Abstract

Considers the environmental differences that may need to be considered when marketers enter into a new country such as media restrictions. Cultural and legal factors. Observes a study of Malaysian media professionals’ perceptions towards various media and advertising restrictions in their country. Presents findings suggesting that advertising images, particularly nudity, indecent language, and sexist images were perceived as major reasons for advertising restrictions.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

David S. Waller, Kim‐Shyan Fam and B. Zafer Erdogan

The purpose of this paper is to determine attitudes towards the advertising of certain controversial products/services and reasons for being offensive across four…

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15038

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine attitudes towards the advertising of certain controversial products/services and reasons for being offensive across four different countries, Malaysia, New Zealand, Turkey and the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

This was achieved by analyzing the responses to a questionnaire that was distributed to a convenience sample of university students in the four countries. A total of 954 were sampled for this study. The results indicated that geography is not a major determinant of attitudes, and that religious and historical factors play a very important role.

Findings

Of the 17 products presented, 11 resulted in similar answers for New Zealand and the UK, and seven were similar for Malaysia and Turkey. However, it was apparent that the two countries mostly populated by Muslims had some differences as Malaysia has a multicultural society that must make some allowances for other ethnic groups. It also appears that racism and racist images are of concern to all those sampled.

Originality/value

The opening up of regional markets and the development of regional and global media, such as satellite television and the internet, will mean that marketers will try to take advantage of the associated benefits of a standardized approach to advertising and promotional activities. For those involved in international marketing, it is important that they are aware of possible differences and cultural sensitivities when entering a new market or undertaking a standardized mass‐media campaign across a region, whether it be Australasia or Europe.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Gayle Kerr, Kathleen Mortimer, Sonia Dickinson and David S. Waller

The purpose of this study is to examine the concept of consumer power, in particular the power or bloggers in the online environment and how this might be applied to the…

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7838

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the concept of consumer power, in particular the power or bloggers in the online environment and how this might be applied to the regulation of advertising.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising Denegri‐Knott's (2006) four on‐line power strategies, a content analysis of weblogs of Tourism Australia's “Where the bloody hell are you?” advertising campaign is undertaken. Blogger behaviour towards this controversial campaign is documented and consumer power strategies are examined.

Findings

This study reveals that bloggers are circumventing the traditional self regulatory process by distributing information, opinion, and even banned advertising material, thereby forming power hubs of like‐minded people, with the potential to become online pressure groups, augmenting the traditional powers of consumers in the self regulatory process.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include a single case context and its exploration of a single media tool (weblogs). Also, bloggers are not representative of the general public, but do provide an alternative to the general category of complainants.

Practical implications

The paper provides evidence that bloggers are defacto regulators in the online environment providing judgements on advertising campaigns, supporting those with like‐minded views and disciplining others, and even making banned advertisements publicly available. Advertisers should be mindful of this activity in developing campaigns, especially in formulating controversial campaigns aimed to be disseminated online.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to relate consumer power in the online environment to self‐regulation. It is also first to study a new group of advertising complainants – the bloggers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Kim Shyan Fam, David S. Waller and B. Zafer Erdogan

In a constantly changing and increasingly globalized world, religion still plays a significant role in influencing social and consumer behavior. This study will analyze…

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18632

Abstract

In a constantly changing and increasingly globalized world, religion still plays a significant role in influencing social and consumer behavior. This study will analyze what influence religion and intensity of belief has on attitudes towards the advertising of particular controversial products and services. A questionnaire was distributed to 1,393 people across six different countries and resulting in samples of four main religious groups. The results indicated some statistically significant differences between the groups, which can have important implications for global marketers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 38 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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