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1 – 10 of 18
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

David S. Steingard and Dale E. Fitzgibbons

Offers a postmodern, deconstructive analysis of total qualitymanagement (TQM) theory and practice. Problematizing TQM, uncoversunchallenged assumptions and implicit power…

Abstract

Offers a postmodern, deconstructive analysis of total quality management (TQM) theory and practice. Problematizing TQM, uncovers unchallenged assumptions and implicit power relations cloaked by management science′s veil of objectivity and value‐neutrality. Tracing these assumptions and power relations to the life‐worlds of TQM organizations, regrettably discovers an obsequious and dehumanized subjectivity of TQM workers. These alienated TQM workers are inscribed in a seamless and inescapable network of totalitarian power relations epitomized by authoritarian admonitions of “the one right way”, “quality is Job 1”, and “quality or else”. As hegemonic TQM ideology insidiously permeates all aspects of social life, witnesses an unparalleled threat to the basic individual rights of a liberal democracy. Proclaiming the “death of TQM”, optimistically discusses preliminary suggestions for an emancipatory post‐TQM theory and practice.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

David S. Steingard and Dale E. Fitzgibbons

Calls into question the widespread, and seemingly inevitable,globalization of Western business practices into every corner of theplanet. Challenges the assumption that…

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Abstract

Calls into question the widespread, and seemingly inevitable, globalization of Western business practices into every corner of the planet. Challenges the assumption that host countries will necessarily benefit from globalization. Stimulates critical thinking and reflection about globalization′s origins, cultural sensitivity, fairness, sources of power and future impact on the wellbeing of our planet. Employs a variation of “deconstruction” and notions of post‐modernism to engender an emancipatory anti‐globalization praxis for teaching and consulting. Offers some preliminary contours of a postmodern anti‐globalization discourse employing examples from The Body Shop International plc.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 3 February 2000

Gurudev S. Khalsa and David S. Steingard

This chapter offers a relationally based organizational development (OD) model for understanding the crisis period that characterizes an organization in transition between…

Abstract

This chapter offers a relationally based organizational development (OD) model for understanding the crisis period that characterizes an organization in transition between life-cycle stages. In this model, organizations are viewed as holographically comprising relationships at multiple levels—among people, groups, functions, and other organizations in the environment. During transition crises, relations at all of these levels tend to become polarized, threatening the organization, its people, and the mission it serves. By embracing these powerful “creative tensions” through a process we call “relational healing,” stakeholders come to see their organization more holistically as a set of interwoven relationships evolving toward a new life stage of their choosing. Drawing upon OD approaches such as appreciative inquiry and dialogue, relational healing guides the organization to greater integrity via a five-stage “wholing” model: splitting, engagement, appreciation, release, and reintegration. The model is grounded in our research and consulting work with JAZZ, a not-for-profit arts organization that worked through a life-transition crisis over a two-year period. In-depth case stories from this work illustrate the fragmentation and subsequent healing of relationship at multiple levels, leading to a radically transformed and reenergized organization.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-041-8

Book part
Publication date: 3 February 2000

Abstract

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-041-8

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Darlyne Bailey, François Héon and David Steingard

Outlines a post‐modern approach to international and globaldevelopment conceived during a visit to Ghana in the autumn of 1992.First offers a critique of modern…

Abstract

Outlines a post‐modern approach to international and global development conceived during a visit to Ghana in the autumn of 1992. First offers a critique of modern development′s techno‐bureaucratic, unsustainable over‐consumption ethos and its accompanying practices of Western expert imperialism. With the conception of post‐modern de‐velopment, intervelopment, infuses the ailing sustainable development paradigm with an affirmative radical humanist and relationally interconnected manifesto. Envisages a new synthesis between sustainable development and the practice of intervelopment: global interbeing – a way of experiencing an emancipated, harmonious, economically equitable, and culturally diverse world. Discusses the impact of intervelopment and global interbeing on the life and work of organization and international development practitioners.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 18 April 2022

Ana Maria Davila Gomez and David Crowther

This chapter is concerned with the social pillar of sustainability and how management education can assist in ensuring the equity among people that is necessary to achieve…

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with the social pillar of sustainability and how management education can assist in ensuring the equity among people that is necessary to achieve sustainability. The chapter considers how a sense of responsibility towards ensuring equity and fairness is derived and the sources of this. It argues that early education teaches aspects of fairness, but at a higher education level, further education is a working context continues to be necessary but is very often absent. It is at this stage that the educators in management have a role and responsibility. Unfortunately in a work context, people tend to be considered merely as operands within a production process and not as real people, and thus considerations of fairness and concern tend to be eliminated, with a tendency towards exploitation. This of course is not sustainable, and the chapter argues that at the higher education level this can be addressed with noticeable effect.

Details

The Equal Pillars of Sustainability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-066-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Ana Maria Davila Gomez and David Crowther

Inequities among people all around the world as well as indifference towards the environment continue to be a constant reality despite the efforts of some organizations…

Abstract

Inequities among people all around the world as well as indifference towards the environment continue to be a constant reality despite the efforts of some organizations worldwide for a better future. We consider that these efforts need to be amplified by many other organizations, therefore, the role of managers as practitioners who conduct organizations' actions need to be explored in the sense of their contribution for improving our reality. Hence, for a better future, a sustainable world that could be more fair, honest and concerned towards nature. To us, this calls into question the role of management education to this regard. Our research studies indicate that one way to contribute to this aim is by means of introducing in contents and pedagogical practices of our courses, the appropriateness of human values in students, as they are the future managers. In this chapter, we present some of these human values, sometimes considered by many religious traditions as spiritual values, which are: wholeness, forethought, solidarity and compassion. We conceptualize these values, and throughout critical reflections, we show how they are taken into account, or simply disregarded, in various courses and domains of Business Schools. At the end, we present some suggestions for pedagogical practices.

Details

CSR in an age of Isolationism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-268-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

David M. Boje and Robert D. Winsor

Looks at the historical roots of TQM. Finds that TQM, while popularly attributed to W. Edwards Deming, can be linked in Japan to 1920s industrialization and to the…

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Abstract

Looks at the historical roots of TQM. Finds that TQM, while popularly attributed to W. Edwards Deming, can be linked in Japan to 1920s industrialization and to the importation of Taylor’s philosophy. Posits that TQM’s neo‐modernism. Concludes with post‐TQM ideas for managing change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Kent D. Miller

Bringing spiritual and religious perspectives to management and organization research requires clarifying the methodological implications and grappling with the diversity…

Abstract

Purpose

Bringing spiritual and religious perspectives to management and organization research requires clarifying the methodological implications and grappling with the diversity that characterizes the research community. This article aims to address both of these issues. The focal question addressed here is, how might spiritual and religious researchers effectively engage in interfaith dialogue in the ostensibly secular field of management and organization studies?

Design/methodology/approach

This article takes exception to privileging secularism over other faiths and argues for admitting spiritual and religious perspectives into the field of management and organization studies. It addresses how theological reflection can be carried out within a spiritually and religiously pluralist research community in management and organization studies.

Findings

Section 2 characterizes secularity and raises the possibility of moving beyond secularism to interfaith dialogue in the field of management and organization studies. Section 3 reviews influential perspectives on dialogue to identify attitudes and behaviors conducive to social learning. Section 4 introduces theological reflection as a method for conducting management and organization research and provides guidance and methods for pursuing interfaith dialogue.

Research limitations/implications

This article proposes interfaith dialogue as a way to explore important assumptions, ultimate concerns and innovative practices that currently go largely unraised in management and organization research.

Originality/value

This article adds to the methods available in the field by characterizing effective dialogue and introducing and explaining theological reflection. It contributes general guidance and proposes specific methods for moving to interfaith dialogue among researchers working from diverse faiths.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 40 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Joonwhan David Lee, Angelica Bahl, Gregory S. Black, Darrin C. Duber-Smith and Nicole S. Vowles

Using broad definitions of sustainable and non-sustainable consumer behavior, identifying key elements of these types of consumer behavior and differentiating between…

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Abstract

Purpose

Using broad definitions of sustainable and non-sustainable consumer behavior, identifying key elements of these types of consumer behavior and differentiating between spirituality and religiosity, the purpose of this study is to develop and test a research model.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was conducted to identify elements of the research constructs. Literature on sustainable business practices was particularly important. Once elements were identified, measures used in previous consumer behavior research were used to collect data from 116 undergraduate students enrolled in marketing and management classes at a major university located in the southwestern USA.

Findings

Results indicate that the level of a consumer’s spirituality affects both sustainable and non-sustainable consumer behavior. In addition, the model predicts that the level of a consumer’s religiosity has no impact on non-sustainable consumer behavior, and this prediction is verified by the study results.

Practical implications

As it is important for businesses to conduct sustainable business practices, it may also be beneficial to consumers to practice sustainable behavior. A significant predictor of this sustainable consumer behavior is spirituality, and it is important to distinguish spirituality from religiosity.

Originality/value

Sustainable consumer behavior is more thoroughly described. Also, religiosity and spirituality are delineated. Finally, for the first time, the separate and distinct impact of religiosity and spirituality on sustainable and non-sustainable consumer behavior is assessed.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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