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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Adeyemi Ayodele Akintola, Senthilkumar Venkatachalam, David Root and Akponanabofa Henry Oti

Critics of claims about building information modeling’s (BIM’s) capability to revolutionize construction industry practices describe it as overhyped, fallacious and…

Abstract

Purpose

Critics of claims about building information modeling’s (BIM’s) capability to revolutionize construction industry practices describe it as overhyped, fallacious and therefore suggest that there is need for a more critical examination of its change impacts. Others have posited that the changes BIM induces are evolutionary rather than revolutionary. In this vein, the purpose of this paper was to undertake a careful analysis of the nature of such changes to distil actual changes that happened, and the type of agency that brings such changes about.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from appropriate qualitative research strategies, data was collected through key informant interviews from consulting organizations in South Africa that have implemented BIM within their organizations and on projects.

Findings

Changes in organizations’ work practices were evident in their workflows, formal/informal methods of interaction, norms, leadership and authority structures, remuneration and the way work was conceived or conceptualized. Furthermore, changes in organizational work practices do not solely occur through the direct agency of the BIM tool’s implementation. Instead, BIM-induced change occurs by delegated, conditional and needs-based agency – which are not mutually exclusive.

Originality/value

The nature of changes in professional work practices could be misconstrued as being solely because of the actions of agents who actively participate in implementing BIM. The discussion in the literature has, therefore, been advanced from general to specific theoretical understandings of BIM-induced change, which emphasize the need for construction stakeholders to actively participate in developing the innovations that drive change in the industry rather than hand the power to drive change to BIM authoring and management application developers who have less stake in the industry.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Patrick O’Sullivan

This paper aims to provide a brief overview of the anti-money laundering (AML) failings documented by the US Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations found in Hong Kong…

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1286

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a brief overview of the anti-money laundering (AML) failings documented by the US Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations found in Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation (HSBC) Mexico. This paper focuses in on the key areas of concern raised by the 2012 report in respect of HSBC Mexico (HBMX) such as failure to undertake correct customer due diligence on high risk customers and repeated failings by senior management at HBMX to remedy these problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The relevant parts of the Subcommittee report relating to HBMX were examined along with the evidence submitted to the Subcommittee. From this examination, the author then noted the key examples of AML failings at HBMX and then commented on these examples while also referring to academic and regulatory guidance such as that from Financial Action Task Force.

Findings

Certain proposals are made throughout the paper, but these remain only suggestive. The key point is that the failings evident in HBMX may very well arise in other institutions, and this paper proposes how these failings may be resolved.

Research limitations/implications

Research for this paper remained limited to second-source references such as the Subcommittee report and the listed Exhibits along with other academic resources. The paper was also peer reviewed by a compliance officer. However, examining the paper from a more practical viewpoint may have struck a better balance between an optimal and realistic level of compliance.

Practical implications

Adopting an analytic approach to the subject of AML controls should aid those who work in compliance daily while also generating further commentary among both regulators and senior management within financial institutions.

Originality/value

The paper is the only one to date to focus on one geographical strand of the AML failings at HSBC and then comment on this from an academic perspective.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Solomon Desta, David Root and C.J. Diederichs

The PMO is seen as an organisational entity entrusted to instil Project Management (PM) practices and culture within an organisation and is portrayed as the focal point of…

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1198

Abstract

The PMO is seen as an organisational entity entrusted to instil Project Management (PM) practices and culture within an organisation and is portrayed as the focal point of PM practices and the locus where an organisation’s knowledge management and PM practices intersect. Companies within a range of economic sectors are accommodating this entity in their organisation structures. Whilst the PMO may not appear to be prevalent in the AEC sector, many of the capabilities ascribed to it do exist either separately or in aggregate within AEC organisations. This paper presents the results of a survey, explored the adoption of the PMO concept within main contractors, project management practices, and developers in the German AEC sector. It discusses the roles that this entity can play in the organisations that are aspiring to achieve a higher level of PM competency and maturity. It also investigates the success factors associated with the successful implementation of the PMO construct and reports on some of the challenges faced in implementing the entity together with potential ways of alleviating these challenges. The research identified that there was a high level of awareness of the PMO concept and that there was a high level prevalence of many of capabilities ascribed to PMOs in the organisations sampled. Many of these organisations recognised that the PMO concept as contributing considerably to knowledge management in their organisation.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

David Andresen

PC users who have a hard disk face an interesting dilemma: how to keep track of all the files in the directory. Did you ever try to pick out a single file as names whiz by…

Abstract

PC users who have a hard disk face an interesting dilemma: how to keep track of all the files in the directory. Did you ever try to pick out a single file as names whiz by on the screen? Or did you ever try to figure out which files go with which programs? It can be pretty confusing.

Details

OCLC Micro, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 8756-5196

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Margaret Martinez

If your hard disk is (soon to be) installed, you're ready to learn about hard disk management. In this article, I'll attempt to briefly define hard disk management and why…

Abstract

If your hard disk is (soon to be) installed, you're ready to learn about hard disk management. In this article, I'll attempt to briefly define hard disk management and why it's important. I'll outline one method of organizing a hard disk and explain each step. I've included a short glossary of terms that may not be familiar and a bibliography of several articles that present different approaches to the same process (I found Nieburg's article especially helpful). When you've completed this article, I hope you'll have a clearer understanding of what a hard disk can do for you and what you must do to achieve that usefulness. If you choose to follow me step‐by‐step, you'll also have a menu‐driven hard disk system that can manage your functional requirements easily.

Details

OCLC Micro, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 8756-5196

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Simon A. Austin, Anthony Thorpe, David Root, Derek Thomson and Jamie Hammond

The purpose of this paper is to describe an approach to managing the supply chain from the perspective of design which the paper refers to as integrated collaborative design (ICD).

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2745

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an approach to managing the supply chain from the perspective of design which the paper refers to as integrated collaborative design (ICD).

Design/methodology/approach

Building on a substantial program of research using a range of methodologies previously reported, the concept of a design chain is described the argument is made that the industry needs to center the development of integrated teams (as proposed in accelerating change) around collaborative working of all parties involved in the design process.

Findings

The research recognizes that the construction sector is too often focused on the short‐term objectives of projects, rather than long‐term business strategy and organizational relationships. The ICD approach involves three steps: identifying tasks (process management); allocating roles (as part of supply chain management); and focusing design solutions to deliver value.

Originality/value

The paper outlines the principles and approach to ICD and provides a strategic overview within which various techniques and practices can be utilized to integrate organizations and more effectively manage the design process.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Andrew R.J. Dainty, Stephen G. Ison and David S. Root

Econometric forecasts indicate that the UK construction industry faces a severe skills deficit in the foreseeable future. This paper details the results of a major labour…

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4057

Abstract

Econometric forecasts indicate that the UK construction industry faces a severe skills deficit in the foreseeable future. This paper details the results of a major labour market research projects, which canvassed the opinions of over 50 industry stakeholders within the East Midlands region of the UK. Focus groups were used to elicit the collective opinions of key clients, consultants, contractors, industry bodies and employers of all sizes. The key themes and requirements discussed by the participants are used to develop a conjoined strategy for bridging the industry's skills gap at a regional level. It is argued that this package of mutually supportive measures could provide a transferable strategy for addressing skills deficiencies in other regions, particularly given the espoused government aspiration to devolve labour market planning activities to provincial forums and regional development agencies.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Ludwig Martin and David Root

The South African construction industry is undergoing transformation. Part of this metamorphosis is the explosion in the number of “emerging contractors”. However…

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1668

Abstract

Purpose

The South African construction industry is undergoing transformation. Part of this metamorphosis is the explosion in the number of “emerging contractors”. However, emerging contractors have a tendency to fail to develop into sustainable enterprises due to inadequate construction knowledge and lack of experience. These shortfalls can be potentially overcome by learning through appropriate interactions with others who possess the required knowledge and experience but there is an absence of comprehensive data about the form and frequency of such interactions and reliance has tended to be on small scale samples or anecdotal reports. The paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey amongst emerging contractors on interactions in the civil engineering sector was carried out, collecting mainly quantitative but also qualitative data for analysis.

Findings

Significant relations between particular forms of interactions and knowledge perceived to be held by the respondents exist. Interdependencies between interactions and knowledge levels are present. Yet, the findings indicate that these interactions are not fully capitalised on in terms of knowledge gains by the respondents.

Originality/value

Using the conceptual framework of the Basho, as introduced by Nonaka, the knowledge of patterns of interactions with indicators of knowledge‐interaction interdependencies are of interest. Mapping these allows for the relevant existing learning contexts and knowledge transfer mechanisms to be explored and described.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 10 June 2016

John L. Ward

In mid-2013, the Lee family, which owned the Hong Kong based food and health product giant Lee Kum Kee (LKK), struggled with how best to increase involvement of the fifth…

Abstract

In mid-2013, the Lee family, which owned the Hong Kong based food and health product giant Lee Kum Kee (LKK), struggled with how best to increase involvement of the fifth generation (G5), the children of the company's current fourth-generation (G4) senior executives and governance leaders. Only two of the fourteen G5 members had joined the company, and few had expressed interest in further involvement, including in the multiple learning and development programs the business offered, such as a mentoring program. Many of the G5 cousins had expressed little interest in business careers in general, and none of them currently was serving as an LKK intern. G4 members observed that their children were busy with family obligations, hobbies, and emerging careers outside the business. G5's lack of interest in business and governance roles was part of a growing pattern of low family engagement in general, exhibited by the cancellation of recent family retreats (once an annual tradition) because of apathy and some underlying conflict. A history of splits among past generations of the Lee family regarding business leadership made the engagement issue even more meaningful and critical.

Students will consider the challenge from the point of view of G4 family members David Lee, chairman of the family's Family Office, and his sister, Elizabeth Mok, who ran the Family Learning and Development Center. They and their three siblings saw engaging the next generation as a top priority, one related to key concepts including family-business continuity, generational engagement and empowerment, succession, emotional ownership, and intrinsic/extrinsic motivation.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Cathy Parker

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303

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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