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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

David Roe and Johan Bruwer

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which consumer self-concept (self-esteem) and product involvement influences the wine purchase decision at the retail…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which consumer self-concept (self-esteem) and product involvement influences the wine purchase decision at the retail level given the anticipated consumption occasion. The predictive effects of self-concept on this interaction were also explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was in the independent specialist fine wine store environment in Sydney, Australia. Central to the study was the development of a 33-item multi-dimensional fine wine involvement scale (Cronbach’s α =0.846 for 26 final items) for measuring consumers’ involvement.

Findings

Wine product involvement deepens with age but low involvement consumers perceiving risk in making the wrong product choice may well purchase fine wines for situations where self-concept is a moderating factor. In the case of low involvement wine consumers a positive association exists between situational wine choice and self-concept but no significant differences exist for self-concept across any of the consumption occasions. Age and self-concept were both confirmed as linked to levels of consumption. The findings support the notion that wine consumers aged 45 years and older are significantly more disposed to purchase fine wine products.

Practical implications

For self-concept to be relevant to purchase it follows that the wine consumption occasion must be conspicuous.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine the extent to which consumer self-concept and product involvement influences the wine purchase decision at the retail level given the anticipated consumption occasion.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Yaw A. Debrah and Ian G. Smith

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of…

Abstract

Presents over sixty abstracts summarising the 1999 Employment Research Unit annual conference held at the University of Cardiff. Explores the multiple impacts of globalization on work and employment in contemporary organizations. Covers the human resource management implications of organizational responses to globalization. Examines the theoretical, methodological, empirical and comparative issues pertaining to competitiveness and the management of human resources, the impact of organisational strategies and international production on the workplace, the organization of labour markets, human resource development, cultural change in organisations, trade union responses, and trans‐national corporations. Cites many case studies showing how globalization has brought a lot of opportunities together with much change both to the employee and the employer. Considers the threats to existing cultures, structures and systems.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Book part
Publication date: 14 April 2016

Thomas M. Keck and Kevin J. McMahon

From one angle, abortion law appears to confirm the regime politics account of the Supreme Court; after all, the Reagan/Bush coalition succeeded in significantly…

Abstract

From one angle, abortion law appears to confirm the regime politics account of the Supreme Court; after all, the Reagan/Bush coalition succeeded in significantly curtailing the constitutional protection of abortion rights. From another angle, however, it is puzzling that the Reagan/Bush Court repeatedly refused to overturn Roe v. Wade. We argue that time and again electoral considerations led Republican elites to back away from a forceful assertion of their agenda for constitutional change. As a result, the justices generally acted within the range of possibilities acceptable to the governing regime but still typically had multiple doctrinal options from which to choose.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-076-3

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2003

Chin‐Chun Hsu and David J. Boggs

Previous empirical results on the relationship between internationalization and firm performance have been mixed. Both monotonic and curvilinear relationships have been…

Abstract

Previous empirical results on the relationship between internationalization and firm performance have been mixed. Both monotonic and curvilinear relationships have been reported. Most recent studies have focused on different types of curvilinear relationships, such as inverted Ushaped, standard U‐shaped, and multiple waves. This paper utilizes a more current sample of firms than prior studies have used and decomposes traditional financial performance measures, applying two different measures of degree of internationalization, country scope and foreign sales as a percent of total sales (FSTS), to measure the effects on financial performance of different degrees of internationalization. Several financial performance measures, including traditional indexes (ROE and ROA) and a decomposition of traditional ones (Profit Margin, Total Asset Turnover), are examined.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2019

Robert Neil Killins, David W. Johnk and Peter V. Egly

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of financial regulation policy uncertainty (FRPU) on bank profit and risk.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of financial regulation policy uncertainty (FRPU) on bank profit and risk.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies dynamic panel techniques and uses the Baker et al. (2016) FRPU index and macroeconomic variables to assess FRPU’s impact on bank profit and risk using Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation call reports from Q1 2000 to Q4 2016 for over 4,760 commercial banks.

Findings

The effect of FRPU on profitability (Return on Assets [ROA] and Return on Equity [ROE]) and risk (standard deviation of ROA and ROE) produces complex results. FRPU negatively (positively) impacts profits for small and large banks (money center banks). There is a positive impact on FRPU for small and medium-sized banks, with no impact reported for the large and money center banks.

Practical implications

Findings lead to several implications for financial services regulators, investors and executives as summarized in the conclusion. It is essential to ensure that clear communication channels are open especially to small and medium-sized banks for proper strategic planning, given their greater sensitivity to regulatory uncertainty.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature as follows. First, it explores the impact of FRPU on bank profits and risk using a novel index introduced by Baker et al. (2016). This news-based continuous measure presents a bank profit modeling approach that differs from traditional event study methodology. Second, a large sample of US commercial banks is used which represents an important departure from banking regulation studies.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Tao Li, Mi Luo and David Ng

– The purpose of this paper is to document earnings management of Chinese firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document earnings management of Chinese firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes advantage of the introduction of stringent delisting requirements around 2000 that non-cross-listed firms with consecutive earnings losses for more than two years would be delisted from the mainland Chinese exchanges. The paper examines whether listed firms in Chinese market manage earnings to avoid listings. The paper also examines whether mainland Chinese firms cross-listed in Hong Kong exchanges manage earnings the same way. The measure for earnings management is derived from a kernel density estimate for the return on equity distribution, following Bollen and Pool (2009).

Findings

The paper finds that the new delisting threats induce rampant earnings management on mainland markets, and cross-listing in Hong Kong has a curbing effect on earnings management. The paper also finds that prices became less value relevant after the implementation of delisting regulations, and investors rationally discounted the reliability of earnings announcements in China. Such market responses were absent for cross-listed firms in Hong Kong.

Originality/value

There is little conclusive evidence about whether cross-listing in a non-US market has a curbing effect on earnings management. The paper contributes to this literature by using this unique exogenous policy change in China and following a difference-in-difference approach in identifying the potential curbing effect. The particular measure adapted from Bollen and Pool (2009) utilizes information of the whole distribution of return on equity, thus extends earlier crude comparison of nearest two bars around zero and partially deals with the potential endogeneity problem.

Details

China Finance Review International, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1398

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Helen Chester, Paul Clarkson, Linda Davies, Caroline Sutcliffe, Brenda Roe, Jane Hughes and David Challis

The purpose of this paper is to describe a case study to test the applicability of the discrete choice experiment (DCE) method to assess the preferences of carers of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a case study to test the applicability of the discrete choice experiment (DCE) method to assess the preferences of carers of people with dementia. The focus of enquiry was home care provision.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-method approach was adopted for this pilot study. A literature review identified key characteristics of home care for dementia. This informed consultations with lay representatives. Key attributes of home care for the DCE were identified and formed the basis for the schedule. In all, 28 carers were recruited by two voluntary organisations to complete the DCE. A multinomial logistic regression model was used to analyse the data.

Findings

Seven attributes of home care for people with dementia were identified from the consultation. The use of the DCE approach permitted the identification of those most important to carers. Despite the modest sample, statistically significant findings were reported in relation to five of the attributes indicating their relevance. A lay involvement in the identification of attributes contributed to the ease of administration of the schedule and relevance of the findings.

Originality/value

This study demonstrated the utility of a DCE to capture the preferences of carers of people with dementia and thereby gather information from carers to inform policy, practice and service development. Their involvement in the design of the schedule was critical to this process.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1983

Alfred Rappaport

Strategic plans need to be evaluated in rational economic terms. Earnings per share and book ROI no longer do the job. What is needed, the author contends, is a new…

Abstract

Strategic plans need to be evaluated in rational economic terms. Earnings per share and book ROI no longer do the job. What is needed, the author contends, is a new shareholder value approach.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Pamela Leyva-Townsend, Wilson Rodriguez, Sandra Idrovo and Fredy Pulga

This study aims to elucidate the relationship between women's participation on the board of directors and the company's financial performance in a sample of 45 Colombian…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to elucidate the relationship between women's participation on the board of directors and the company's financial performance in a sample of 45 Colombian companies listed on the Colombia Stock Exchange (CSE) (Bolsa de Valores de Colombia).

Design/methodology/approach

Using 50,214 financial records of 45 companies listed on the CSE during 2008–2016, the authors performed panel data regressions to explore the relationship between the measures of gender diversity on boards and the impact on corporate financial performance.

Findings

The authors show that the participation and presence of at least one woman on the board of directors are positively associated with firm financial performance as measured by return on equity (ROE), but not as measured by Tobin’s Q. This second indicator is positively associated with firm financial performance when there are at least three female directors on boards of 10 or more individuals.

Practical implications

The findings also provide evidence supporting the development of managerial and organizational mechanisms that strengthen female presence at the highest level of governance.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates that female presence on boards has a positive impact on firms’ financial performance, but the degree of diversity impacts differently ROE and Tobin’s Q. These findings are based on a study of an emerging economy in Latin America, and data on similar economies are scarce.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

Saiful Azhar Rosly and Mohammad Ashadi Mohd. Zaini

The purpose of this paper is to study the differences or variance in the yields of Islamic and conventional bank deposits and capital, respectively, in view of their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the differences or variance in the yields of Islamic and conventional bank deposits and capital, respectively, in view of their contractual differences, namely the former which is based on equity and the latter on debt.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a financial ratio approach.

Findings

It was found that deposit yields in conventional banks were lower than return on equity (ROE), which truly reflect the contractual differences between fixed deposit and bank's capital. Also, it was found that Islamic banks' deposit yield and ROEs do not reflect their risk‐taking properties, as their variances were found to be smaller.

Research limitations/implications

The paper adds to the literature on risk‐return relationship in Islamic capital theory, which currently lacks theoretical studies.

Practical implications

The paper shows that increasing the level of risk taking in mudarabah investment account could increase its expected returns.

Originality/value

Since both shareholders' capital and mudarabah investment accounts constitute risk capital, variance in yields should be proportional to risk. The paper is the first attempt to explore and compare yields from Islamic bank capital and mudarabah deposits.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 34 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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