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Article

Cigdem Gonul Kochan and David R. Nowicki

The study of supply chain resilience (SCRES) continues to gain interest in the academic and practitioner communities. The purpose of this paper is to present a focused…

Abstract

Purpose

The study of supply chain resilience (SCRES) continues to gain interest in the academic and practitioner communities. The purpose of this paper is to present a focused review of the SCRES literature by investigating supply chain (SC) capabilities, their relationship to SCRES outcomes and the underpinning theoretical mechanisms of this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the systematic literature review approach to examine 383 articles published between 2000 and 2017, ultimately down selecting to the most relevant 228 peer-reviewed studies. Context-interventions-mechanisms-outcomes (CIMO) logic is applied to organize and synthesize these peer-reviewed studies. A typological framework is developed from the CIMO-based classification of the SCRES literature.

Findings

The findings of this study outline the gaps in the SCRES literature and present an agenda for future research.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents an exploratory research; therefore, the typological model presented is just one of the possible perspectives.

Practical implications

The typology of SCRES literature can help practitioners to understand SCRES and to measure and assess the resilience of SCs.

Originality/value

The paper provides clear definitions of SCRES constructs, develops a typological framework to further understand SCRES and identifies SCRES measures and assessment techniques.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article

C. Michael Wittmann, David R Nowicki, Terry L Pohlen and Wesley S Randall

Research suggests that service-dominant logic (SDL) is well suited to support supply chain management (SCM) research and practice. Qualitative research has shown that SDL…

Abstract

Purpose

Research suggests that service-dominant logic (SDL) is well suited to support supply chain management (SCM) research and practice. Qualitative research has shown that SDL is particularly consistent with an outcome-based supply chain strategy known as performance-based logistics (PBL). The purpose of this paper is to extend theory and practice by exploring the degree to which SDL is utilized in practice. Specifically, PBL is examined for consistency with the underlying fundamental premises (FPs) of SDL. In doing so, this paper answers the positive question, “what exists”, at the intersection of SDL and SCM.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a mixed methodological approach. First, the FPs of SDL are operationalized using the language of PBL. The PBL FPs are tested quantitatively through an online survey of 52 supply chain PBL experts. A qualitative analysis is conducted using comments associated with each premise.

Findings

The survey results suggest that PBL is consistent with SDL. These results indicate that PBL is a supply chain context of SDL.

Originality/value

This is one of the first works to examine the degree to which SDL concepts are being utilized in practice.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 44 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article

Wesley S. Randall, David R. Nowicki, Gopikrishna Deshpande and Robert F. Lusch

The purpose of this paper is to describe the conversion of knowledge into value by examining the confluence of service-dominant logic (S-D logic), supply chain management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the conversion of knowledge into value by examining the confluence of service-dominant logic (S-D logic), supply chain management (SCM), human resource management (HRM), and neuroeconomics. S-D logic suggests that knowledge is the raw material of value creation. SCM provides an organized foundation to study the conversion of raw materials into value. HRM recognizes the centrality of human decisions in the process of converting knowledge into value. Neuroscience gives insight into the efficiency and effectiveness of the human decisions processes. Global SCM provides more than markets and raw materials – global SCM provides the human resources central to value creation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper combines literature review with interviews from members of supply chain teams engaged in performance-based logistics (PBL) to develop a model of the S-D logic knowledge conversion process.

Findings

The model describes individual-based decision constructs managers can expect to face as they convert knowledge, from a global supply chain team, into value. The model relates the decision maker mindset, based in neuroscience principals, to the efficiency of the knowledge conversion process. These principals are extended to suggest how managers can modulate human resource processes to improve the efficiency of economic exchange and increase supply chain resiliency.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides theoretical and practical insight into how differences in culture, neuronal predisposition, and genetics may influence managerial decisions. These findings provide a mechanism that researchers and managers may take to expand the boundaries of HRM in a global supply chain.

Originality/value

This work uses a foundation of SCM research to explain efficient conversion in a knowledge-based economy. This perspective demonstrates the criticality of global HRM mindsets and decision processes necessary to achieve competitive advantage in a knowledge-based economy. This provides a context for the study and improvement of neuroeconomic efficiency of firms.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 44 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article

Wesley S. Randall, David R. Nowicki and Timothy G. Hawkins

Performance‐based logistics (PBL) strategies are providing governments and for‐profit organizations with a contractual mechanism that reduces the life cycle costs of their…

Abstract

Purpose

Performance‐based logistics (PBL) strategies are providing governments and for‐profit organizations with a contractual mechanism that reduces the life cycle costs of their systems. PBL accomplishes this by establishing contracts that focus on the delivery of performance not parts. PBL establishes a metric based governance structure where suppliers make more profit when they invest in logistics process improvements, or system redesign, that reduces total cost of ownership. While work has been done to outline an overall PBL theoretical framework, the underlying theory explaining the enablers that lead to organizational and team‐level, team‐goal alignment associated with the PBL governance structure requires testing. The purpose of this paper is to quantitatively test previously posited relationships between enablers of PBL and PBL effectiveness. An additional objective is to explore any differences in PBL effectiveness between different business sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple regression model was developed, tested and validated to explain the effectiveness of PBL. The model was externally validated with exploratory cross‐sectional survey data of 61 practitioners.

Findings

This study strongly supports recent PBL theory explaining PBL effectiveness. Key antecedents include investment climate, relational exchange, PBL leadership, and business sector. Further, government organizations lag behind their commercial counterparts in PBL effectiveness and PBL leadership.

Practical implications

PBL business arrangements are more effective in more favorable investment climates. Thus, leaders should welcome new ideas, empower employees, and encourage entrepreneurship. Since PBL effectiveness increases with relational exchange, building trust and communicating with suppliers is key. Leadership is also important to PBL effectiveness. Leaders should accept risk, focus on long‐term affordability and performance, and align activities to achieve end‐user goals.

Originality/value

This research is the first quantitative test of previously posited factors affecting PBL effectiveness. Additionally, this research unveils key differences in business sectors' use of PBL strategies.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Content available
Article

Abstract

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article

J. Kiarash Sadeghi, Elisabeth Struckell, Divesh Ojha and David Nowicki

Service organization supply chains provide a context that amplifies the complexity of interorganizational interdependencies and the need to build unique capabilities and…

Abstract

Purpose

Service organization supply chains provide a context that amplifies the complexity of interorganizational interdependencies and the need to build unique capabilities and innovative solutions, especially when confronted with man-made or natural disasters. Using the lens of complex adaptive systems (CAS), this study aims to investigate the role of absorptive capacity (AC), change management capability and information quality in improving a firm’s ability to cope with disasters – disaster immunity (DI). The study uniquely parses absorptive capacity into a three-variable, second-order construct (absorptive human resource management, absorptive complementary knowledge and absorptive infrastructure).

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected from 264 US service firms in a supply chain context, this paper evaluates the research model using the structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

The second-order, three-dimensional framework for AC has far superior psychometric properties as compared to the previous unidimensional conceptualizations. Results show that AC influences a firm’s DI through change management capability and information quality – two DI enhancing resources.

Originality/value

The paper builds on previous conceptual discussions of absorptive capacity as a multidimensional construct by operationalizing AC as a latent variable with three dimensions (above). Moreover, this paper shows that AC, change management capability, information quality and DI are interrelated parts of a CAS.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Book part

Alexandra E. MacDougall, Zhanna Bagdasarov, James F. Johnson and Michael D. Mumford

Business ethics provide a potent source of competitive advantage, placing increasing pressure on organizations to create and maintain an ethical workforce. Nonetheless…

Abstract

Business ethics provide a potent source of competitive advantage, placing increasing pressure on organizations to create and maintain an ethical workforce. Nonetheless, ethical breaches continue to permeate corporate life, suggesting that there is something missing from how we conceptualize and institutionalize organizational ethics. The current effort seeks to fill this void in two ways. First, we introduce an extended ethical framework premised on sensemaking in organizations. Within this framework, we suggest that multiple individual, organizational, and societal factors may differentially influence the ethical sensemaking process. Second, we contend that human resource management plays a central role in sustaining workplace ethics and explore the strategies through which human resource personnel can work to foster an ethical culture and spearhead ethics initiatives. Future research directions applicable to scholars in both the ethics and human resources domains are provided.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-016-6

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

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Article

John Rose, David Rose, Cliff Hawkins and Caitlin Anderson

This paper aims to provide a rationale for the development of a community‐based group for men with intellectual disability who have been involved in sexually inappropriate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a rationale for the development of a community‐based group for men with intellectual disability who have been involved in sexually inappropriate behaviour but may not have been charged.

Design/methodology/approach

The group was based on a cognitive behavioural model: group process and adaptations are briefly described. The group has been run on two occasions and preliminary data on outcome are provided.

Findings

Participants show a reduction in attitudes consistent with offending, an increase in sexual knowledge, and a more external locus of control on completion of the group. One of the 12 men who attended was recorded as offending again within 18 months of group completion; however, three moved to less well supervised placements.

Originality/value

It is concluded that this style of treatment has some advantages over other models and may be more effective, yet further research is required.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

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Book part

Oscar Ybarra, Ethan Kross, David Seungjae Lee, Yufang Zhao, Adrienne Dougherty and Jeffrey Sanchez-Burks

Researchers have undertaken many approaches to conceptualizing and assessing EI. Some approaches combine self-reported EI with broader personality constructs. Other…

Abstract

Researchers have undertaken many approaches to conceptualizing and assessing EI. Some approaches combine self-reported EI with broader personality constructs. Other approaches are based on so-called ability measures of EI, whether as tendencies people can self-report (Tett, Fox, & Wang, 2005) or as assessments developed to measure specific components of EI (e.g., Nowicki & Duke, 1994). We briefly survey the literature to arrive at a working understanding of what EI is currently thought to be (for more extensive reviews, see Mayer, Roberts, & Barsade, 2008; Zeidner, Matthews, Roberts, 2009).

Details

Advances in Positive Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-000-1

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