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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Allan Metz

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the…

Abstract

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the Clinton presidency, systematically have sought to undermine this president with the goal of bringing down his presidency and running him out of office; and that they have sought non‐electoral means to remove him from office, including Travelgate, the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, the Filegate controversy, and the Monica Lewinsky matter. This bibliography identifies these and other means by presenting citations about these individuals and organizations that have opposed Clinton. The bibliography is divided into five sections: General; “The conspiracy stream of conspiracy commerce”, a White House‐produced “report” presenting its view of a right‐wing conspiracy against the Clinton presidency; Funding; Conservative organizations; and Publishing/media. Many of the annotations note the links among these key players.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2004

Mircea Gh. Negoita and David Pritchard

Education is increasingly using Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS), both for modelling instructional and teaching strategies and for enhancing educational programs. The…

Abstract

Education is increasingly using Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS), both for modelling instructional and teaching strategies and for enhancing educational programs. The first part of the paper introduces the basic structure of an ITS as well as common problems being experienced within the ITS community. The second part describes WITNeSS ‐ an original hybrid intelligent system using Fuzzy‐Neural‐GA techniques for optimising the presentation of learning material to a student. The original work in this paper is related to the concept of a “virtual student”. This student model, modelled using fuzzy technologies, will be useful for any ITS, providing it with an optimal learning strategy for fitting the ITS itself to the unique needs of each individual student. In the third part, experiments focus on problems developing a “virtual student” model, which simulates, in a rudimentary way, human learning behaviour. Part four finishes with concluding remarks.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Siu‐Ki Henty To and Brian H. Kleiner

Emphasizes the importance of effective hiring. Discusses the factors influencing hiring including the legal aspects and the best sources for recruitment. Outlines…

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Abstract

Emphasizes the importance of effective hiring. Discusses the factors influencing hiring including the legal aspects and the best sources for recruitment. Outlines characteristics that are common to successful companies. Provides brief case studies of corporate application procedures. Attempts to evaluate the success of hiring through the comparison of various different statistics. Concludes that whilst all companies have different needs, the ability to keep up to date with legislation and evaluate present procedures is essential.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1915

Merchants and manufacturers have it in their power to minimise in some degree the extent to which we are becoming indebted to foreign countries in respect of the large…

Abstract

Merchants and manufacturers have it in their power to minimise in some degree the extent to which we are becoming indebted to foreign countries in respect of the large excess of imports over exports, by obtaining, as far as possible, their imported supplies of food products and raw materials for industries from countries within the Empire. Take, for example, meat and cheese. The prevailing high prices are no doubt encouraging the home production of these commodities. Nevertheless a large quantity must necessarily be imported. In 1914 meat to the value of 62 million pounds was imported, and cheese to the value of 8 million pounds. Of the imports of meat 26 per cent. came from within the Empire, and of cheese 82 per cent. Clearly it is better under existing circumstances that we should buy meat from Australia and New Zealand than from Argentina, and cheese from Canada and New Zealand rather than from Holland and the United States. Many other examples may be mentioned of products which can equally as well be obtained within the Empire as from foreign countries, such as maize from South Africa, where a large increase of production is expected this year; oats from Canada rather than from Argentina and the United States; barley from Canada; peas from New Zealand; butter from Australia and New Zealand; canned salmon, of which 2½ million pounds' worth was imported in 1914, from Canada rather than from the United States; apples from Canada and Australia; wine from Australia; tea from India and Ceylon rather than from China and Java; cocoa from the Gold Coast and the West Indies; copra from Malaya, India and Australia; rubber from Malaya and Ceylon; fibres from New Zealand, Mauritius, Ceylon, etc.; wood pulp from Canada and Newfoundland; wool from Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and the Falkland Islands rather than from Argentina, Chile and other foreign sources; tanning materials from India, Natal, Australia and British East Africa; dyewoods from the West Indies; timber from Canada; hardwoods from India, West Africa, the West Indies and Australia; copper and copper ore from Australia and South Africa; tin and tin ore from Malaya, Nigeria, South Africa and Australia; manganese from India; plumbago from Ceylon; hides from India, Africa and Australia, and so forth. It has been stated that the result of the war may ultimately depend largely on financial strength. In that case the country which is to the greatest extent self‐supporting as regards supplies of the necessaries of life and materials for the manufacture of munitions of war will be in a position to carry on the longest. Undoubtedly the British Empire contains within itself the power to produce all such materials, and the Dominions, Colonies and Dependencies are in fact already supplying a large proportion of the food products and raw materials for industries, which are imported into the United Kingdom. There are a few notable exceptions, e.g., for our supplies of cotton and sugar we have always been largely dependent on foreign countries, but Uganda and the Soudan are capable of producing in the future very large quantities of cotton of the quality required by Lancashire spinners, and sugar production in our Colonies could, with proper encouragement, be expanded so as to meet the whole of the requirements of the Mother Country. If the British capital and energy which have in the past gone every year to the development of enterprises in foreign countries had been devoted for a tew years exclusively to exploiting the resources of the Dominions and Colonies, the British Empire would, by this time, have become practically self‐supporting, and the bulk of our imported foodstuffs and raw products required for our manufacturing industries would now be obtained from within the Empire and paid for by increased quantities of our own manufactures. It may be hoped that one of the lessons which we shall learn from the war will be definitely to encourage the development of the vast resources of our overseas Empire. — The Chamber of Commerce Journal.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 17 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1955

A contributor to the Financial Times recently observed that the rise of the package has temporarily outstripped the rise of the “ profession or calling ” of packaging. It…

Abstract

A contributor to the Financial Times recently observed that the rise of the package has temporarily outstripped the rise of the “ profession or calling ” of packaging. It was for this reason that the Institute of Packaging organised the very interesting exhibition held at Olympia during the third week of January. The packaging of foodstuffs was necessarily one of the most important sections of the Exhibition—for reasons which are not hard to grasp. Not only has the consumption of bottled beer outstripped draught sales from barrels, but a whole host of foods have moved and continue to move into the domain of packed merchandise. For the moment it will suffice to mention sugar, flour, confectionery, bread, butter, cheese, bacon, vegetables, fruit, and even (occasionally) meat and fish. It has been estimated that the grocery trade sells nearly 80 per cent of its goods in packages. For the consumer, the packaging of food promises quality, purity and freshness, and, within certain limits, full weight and measure. In self‐service retailing, of course, the package is all‐important. Not only does the appearance of the package and its label take the place of the salesman in the retail shop, but the wrapping must also be a barrier which will be a safeguard against excessive evaporation, without inducing mould growth, and against decomposition and stateness. Conditions of moisture, humidity, temperature and pressure may be critical for the preservation of foods in the best possible state. There are dangers arising not only from the effect of the packaging material on the food but also from the reverse influence of the food on the container.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 57 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Daniel Prendergast

The purpose of this paper is to outline the key themes and discussions which came out of the 2011 UK Serials Group (UKSG) conference.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the key themes and discussions which came out of the 2011 UK Serials Group (UKSG) conference.

Design/methodology/approach

The conference is introduced and some of the key sessions are described and evaluated, then the report is drawn to a close with a brief conclusion which summarizes the main themes.

Findings

Many changes in user demands and the future role for libraries, librarians and publishers within the scholarly research sector; libraries need to shift services from “place to space” (physical location to online) to better fulfill their users' needs; many changes in the book industry such as a rapid increase in the number of E‐book sales; an increase in the use of mobile devices such as e‐readers and tablets; publishers are experimenting with new formats, such as print on demand; the lack of library funding, its impact on research output and the on‐going struggle for library survival was a reoccurring theme throughout the conference.

Originality/value

This conference report is relevant to librarians, publishers and information professionals in all sectors.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Lorna Cullen

Printed Circuit World Convention IV, which took place at the Tokyo Prince Hotel, Tokyo, Japan, from 2–5 June 1987, will be reported in two parts. Part 1, in this issue…

Abstract

Printed Circuit World Convention IV, which took place at the Tokyo Prince Hotel, Tokyo, Japan, from 2–5 June 1987, will be reported in two parts. Part 1, in this issue, covers an introduction to the event, the Opening Ceremony, Social and Accompanying Spouse Programmes, Closing Ceremony and some reflections on peripheral activities. In Part 2, in the next issue, a report on the technical sessions will be published, focusing on the highlights of the technical programme.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Garnet Frankenfield and Brian H. Kleiner

States the reasons why companies should screen candidates, and provides brief examples from industry. Outlines a framework for screening, quoting Malcolm Wheatley, of the…

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Abstract

States the reasons why companies should screen candidates, and provides brief examples from industry. Outlines a framework for screening, quoting Malcolm Wheatley, of the UK’s list of how to recruit and retain. Covers the application interview, testing, drug testing, credit checks and referencing. Argues the need for preparation and that the investment is worthwhile in the long term.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Adrian Pritchard, David Cook, Andrew Jones, Tom Bason, Paul Salisbury and Ellie Hickman

The addition of products to the core of matches by professional sports teams (PSTs) has received much coverage. However, there has been limited work as to how their…

Abstract

Purpose

The addition of products to the core of matches by professional sports teams (PSTs) has received much coverage. However, there has been limited work as to how their stadiums are used to stage non-sporting events. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how clubs in the English Football League (EFL) use their venues to diversify into other markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary sources were used to categorise the teams who played in the EFL by: average division turnover, stadium capacity and stadium age. Semi-structured interviews were held with a member of the commercial teams of 21 clubs.

Findings

Clubs use their stadiums to supply a range of products and working with partners is commonplace. These products are targeted at a range of stakeholders, such as supporters, the local community and regionally based organisations. In addition to their own efforts, increased geographical coverage for clubs usually develops in three ways: via internal marketing by local organisations who use the facilities, agents who market the stadium for the club and the EFL who market the league/clubs holistically.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a stadium allows PSTs to diversify by providing new products for new markets. In this instance it has led to the development of capabilities in areas such as conferencing, funerals and weddings.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to examine the capabilities developed by PSTs that lie outside the staging of matches.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2020

Maria Gebbels, Xiongbin Gao and Wenjie Cai

This paper aims to provide an action-orientated reflection for promoting gender equality in hospitality, based on Bradley’s (2013) approach that considers the operation of…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an action-orientated reflection for promoting gender equality in hospitality, based on Bradley’s (2013) approach that considers the operation of gender in the “production” and “reproduction” spheres of social life. To that end, it reflects on women’s career development in hospitality based on the Western perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage thematic analysis of a public research seminar on gender issues in tourism and hospitality were used to explore issues of women’s career development within the intertwining spheres of “production” and “reproduction”.

Findings

Three themes, namely, culture of an open dialogue, bringing men into the equation and educating the future workforce, emerged from data to propose new insights on “what can be done” about gender equality in tourism and hospitality, including practical suggestions for transformations of gender relations in organisations.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes new knowledge on women’s career development in the hospitality industry by proposing recommendations to address gender gaps including fostering a culture of an open dialogue based on an inclusive listening environment, recommending changes to organisational policies and culture and integrating the subject of gender into tourism and hospitality curriculum.

Originality/value

By proposing a sociological perspective of gender in hospitality employment informed by Bradley (2013), this study challenges the traditional masculinity and the long-standing gender labour division through education, organisational and daily practices thus tackling fundamental gender issues.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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