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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2014

David Pollitt

The purpose of this paper is to observe how Morgan Stanley is seeking to overcome misconceptions about the nature of investment banking, concern over work–life balance and…

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429

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to observe how Morgan Stanley is seeking to overcome misconceptions about the nature of investment banking, concern over work–life balance and fears of the existence of a glass ceiling.

Design/methodology/approach

It outlines the bank’s various initiatives to connect with women during their studies or at an early stage in their careers.

Findings

It highlights the importance of outreach work with schools and universities, plus the key role played at the bank by women’s networking groups.

Practical implications

It reveals that the company won the 2013 Opportunity Now inspiring the workforce of the future award for its initiatives aimed at increasing the proportion of women in its top jobs.

Social implications

It reveals how a major investment bank is seeking to challenge the macho image of investment banking.

Originality/value

It explains that Morgan Stanley reached more than 1,600 women at female-specific events in 2012 alone. It views this approach to building a female talent pipeline as a multi-year strategy.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2014

David Pollitt

– This paper aims to chart the journey to Investors in People gold of Cambridge-based tax, legal and accountancy company, Websters.

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154

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to chart the journey to Investors in People gold of Cambridge-based tax, legal and accountancy company, Websters.

Design/methodology/approach

It examines the firm’s policies and approaches, in particular, in the areas of training, teamwork, empowerment and flexible working.

Findings

It emphasizes the importance of openness, mutual respect and shared values at the company.

Practical implications

It reveals that employees set their own development programs, which need not be directly related to their role in the company, although they must benefit the business.

Social implications

It explains how flexible working has been built into the structure of the company from the start.

Originality/value

It describes how a successful business develops, supports and motivates its team.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2014

David Pollitt

This paper aims to relate how “good” human resources (HR) practice is characterized in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and what the drivers are for adopting…

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525

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to relate how “good” human resources (HR) practice is characterized in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and what the drivers are for adopting this good practice. This paper explores methods for measuring the impact of HR practices that are helpful and realistic in the context of an SME.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper studies practices at a family-owned bakery. The study takes the form of an action-research project using semi-structured interviews, participant observation on the factory floor and analysis of company documentation in the diagnosis phase. It reflects action interventions that have informed the findings, together with post-project semi-structured interviews with key actors three years after the completion of the project.

Findings

Discovers that the drivers of good HR practice are size, market position, external “coercive networks”, presenting issues, the ideology of the managing director and the energy of an HR champion.

Practical implications

Demonstrates that the impact of “good” HR practice can be best evaluated in SMEs through one-shot cost-based metrics or more strategic qualitative measures.

Originality/value

Develops an original model to show the relationship between the drivers, the HR practices adopted and measurable outcomes. Makes an important contribution to the debate about HRM in SMEs and has practical value for informing the development of good HR practice in SMEs.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2014

David Pollitt

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the views of the employees of GM Hellas, the subsidiary of the Opel car manufacturer in Greece, with regard to the training…

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167

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the views of the employees of GM Hellas, the subsidiary of the Opel car manufacturer in Greece, with regard to the training they receive from their employer.

Design/methodology/approach

It explains that the conclusions are based on the responses of 114 employees and trainees to a survey at Opel’s 22 largest dealers in Greece.

Findings

It reveals that the training provided by GM Hellas is viewed positively by most employees.

Practical implications

It indicates that GM Hellas could make greater use of online training, which is both popular and cost-effective.

Social implications

It highlights how staff development is contributing to the performance of a company that is flourishing, despite the severe economic downturn in Greece.

Originality/value

Emphasizes the importance of in-company training for business growth and competitiveness.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2014

David Pollitt

The paper aims to investigate the relationship between employees’ trust toward a company and their commitment to it. It questions if certain levels of trust presented in…

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254

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to investigate the relationship between employees’ trust toward a company and their commitment to it. It questions if certain levels of trust presented in each department at Micron Technology, Italy, are interrelated with the levels of commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

It reveals that a survey at Micron Technology Italy was conducted. Of the 1,580 employees who received the questionnaire, 892 responses were collected, resulting in a 56.46 per cent response rate.

Findings

It shows that for departments where trust values are below 6.8, the commitment level follows the trust value: there is a positive relation between these two factors. However, departments where employee trust reaches values higher than 6.8 are not reciprocated by a proportional commitment level that tends to reach a’satisfaction point’.

Practical implications

Advances the view that, since commitment does not seem to continuously increase, after a certain point, it is not cost-effective for a company to implement communication strategies aimed at increasing employee trust in a non-targeted way. The need for customized communication strategies emerges as does the importance of understanding internal communication as integrated with other human-resource management levers.

Social implications

It argues that managers must communicate with their employees as honestly and directly as possible, particularly during uncertain times, and should encourage the employees’ participation in the decision-making process.

Originality/value

It offers an original contribution to the ongoing discussion concerning employee engagement. Employees’ trust does not always lead to employee commitment behaviors inside the organization.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2014

David Pollitt

– The paper aims to analyze the cross-cultural reasons underlying the extreme industrial unrest experienced during the first seven years of Toyota’s operations in India.

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715

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to analyze the cross-cultural reasons underlying the extreme industrial unrest experienced during the first seven years of Toyota’s operations in India.

Design/methodology/approach

It draws on information obtained from 30 personal interviews, field notes, observations and Internet media sources.

Findings

It reports how Toyotism shares three common features with Brahminism – renunciation, performance and perfection – and how antipathy toward the manner in which these features were implemented in India caused significant resistance among the production workforce.

Practical implications

It suggests that management seeking to implement lean manufacturing in India should concentrate on minimizing the antipathy by production workers.

Social implications

It helps to show how employee relations, unrest and antagonism toward lean-manufacturing practices are closely related to cross-cultural issues prevalent in host countries.

Originality/value

It considers that the concept of Brahmanism in Indian employee relations is under-researched in comparison with other aspects of Indian culture, and antipathy toward the concept as a source of resistance to the implementation of lean systems needs to be better understood.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2014

David Pollitt

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the circumstances in which a crisis-response strategy can compound a crisis. The paper focuses on AWB Ltd, Australia, where the…

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417

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the circumstances in which a crisis-response strategy can compound a crisis. The paper focuses on AWB Ltd, Australia, where the organizational damage of a “cover-up” caused additional damage to the company.

Design/methodology/approach

It provides an insight into the application of theories and research on crisis and reputation management and the specific challenges and risks of corporate scandals.

Findings

It demonstrates that corporate scandals can easily descend into a secondary or “double crisis” if incorrectly managed, or even mismanaged.

Practical implications

Examines the initial failed response strategy and the more appropriate response eventually undertaken by the company.

Originality/value

Offers the additional insights of the author, as a former member of the management team at the company.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2014

David Pollitt

– The paper aims to examine BP’s communications response to the Deepwater Horizon disaster, which caused 11 deaths and a huge oil spillage in the Gulf of Mexico.

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1874

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine BP’s communications response to the Deepwater Horizon disaster, which caused 11 deaths and a huge oil spillage in the Gulf of Mexico.

Design/methodology/approach

It draws on such secondary sources as newspapers, audiovisual material and social-network sites.

Findings

It claims that BP lacked some of the tools needed for an effective communications response to the disaster and that the company made mistakes in, for example, putting out a series of advertisements during the clean-up operation.

Practical implications

It puts forward the view that companies ought to have a well-rehearsed crisis-communication strategy that they can easily adapt to the particular circumstances of a given disaster.

Social implications

It looks at some of the things that BP got right, including its Internet response to the crisis.

Originality/value

It emphasizes the importance of good communication strategies when disaster strikes.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

David Pollitt

Downloads
102

Abstract

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

David Pollitt

Downloads
157

Abstract

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 47 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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