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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Duncan Orr, David Emanuel and Norman Wong

This study examines the relationship between board composition and firm value, and the extent to which this relationship may be affected by a company’s investment…

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between board composition and firm value, and the extent to which this relationship may be affected by a company’s investment opportunity set. There is little research that examines this issue, particularly for the New Zealand market. Of the research that exists, and generally for the research that examines how board composition affects firm performance, the findings have been mixed. Using a randomly chosen sample, which improves the external validity of results from prior studies, we find that board composition of high growth option firms is positively related to firm value, and this relationship is maintained when more refined measures that proxy the characteristics of outside directors (such as tenure of outside directors, the level of outside director equity ownership, the number of other board positions held by outside directors, and the total proportion of non‐executive directors, including grey directors) are recognised.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2013

Mark T. Kissling and Angela Calabrese Barton

People rely on power plants to generate the electricity needed to run much of their lives. Power plants, though, are typically not the domain of the average citizen. Even…

Abstract

People rely on power plants to generate the electricity needed to run much of their lives. Power plants, though, are typically not the domain of the average citizen. Even if they stand near homes, schools, and other important places, the operations inside, not to mention the many social and environmental impacts outside, largely lack the scrutiny of most citizens. Is this a problem, especially when some governmental oversight already regulates the plants’ operations? The National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) defines the main purpose of social studies education as creating effective citizens. This article describes an interdisciplinary unit of study by middle-grades youth about a proposed power plant in their city of Lansing, Michigan. It shows students scrutinizing the complex power plant issue through a variety of experiences and from different angles. While supporting NCSS’ stance on the teaching of citizenship, we call for a conception of citizenship extending beyond human communities and structures to the community of the earth and all living beings. We also encourage social studies teachers to take up the work of teaching for ecological citizenship.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Madeleine Orr, Brian P. McCullough and Jamee Pelcher

Given greater awareness of environmental issues and the acceleration of climate change, universities are increasingly requiring undergraduate students to complete…

Abstract

Purpose

Given greater awareness of environmental issues and the acceleration of climate change, universities are increasingly requiring undergraduate students to complete coursework in environmental issues. Research has shown that environmental courses hosted in science departments can be too challenging for students with no science background. Thus, new approaches to general environmental education at the undergraduate level are necessary. This paper aims to advance three transformative sustainability learning (TSL) interventions that leverage sport as the living laboratory for environmental education through examining green teams and in depth sport venue tours.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper details the experimental application of three TSL interventions in undergraduate sport courses.

Findings

Each intervention produced lasting benefits for several parties. Students benefit from greater exposure to sport management organizations and a hands-on learning opportunity. Sport organizations benefit from a promotional opportunity to showcase their sustainability efforts, improved sustainability practices at their facilities and the opportunity to leverage the students’ involvement for fan engagement initiatives

Research limitations/implications

The interventions presented in this paper were developed in a North American sport context, however, there is a considerable opportunity to develop similar interventions in any region where sport organizations exist.

Originality/value

Despite being one of the most universally appreciated and visible industries, the sport industry has yet to be used as a site for meaningful sustainability learning interventions. The interventions presented herein introduce the opportunity to leverage students’ love of sport for outcomes for all parties: the students, the host organization and sport fans.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Content available
204

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1975

DAVID OWEN

Who will train the professional and technician grades of staff that will be needed in the next few years to develop the North Sea oil fields? So far all the signs are that…

Abstract

Who will train the professional and technician grades of staff that will be needed in the next few years to develop the North Sea oil fields? So far all the signs are that it will not be the UK education system despite several Government reports and the attention of the Manpower Services Commission.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

William P. Macaux

The responsible leadership movement may be seen as part of the wider sustainability revolution. Sustainability was defined by the World Commission on Environment and…

1564

Abstract

Purpose

The responsible leadership movement may be seen as part of the wider sustainability revolution. Sustainability was defined by the World Commission on Environment and Development as “economic development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”. Since then, guiding principles have been formulated and a growing number of business leaders have issued a call to action. Still one expert, Orr, recently concluded that “virtually no indicator of planetary health is moving in a positive direction, and we should ask why.” The purpose of this paper, heeding the admonition to “ask why”, is to examine what it means to be responsible as a leader at this time, in this context.

Design/methodology/approach

A consensus view of the context and the accountabilities it implies is gleaned from an analysis of sustainability principles. A psychological approach to conceptualizing leader responsibility as a variable in personal development is elaborated under the normative construct of generativity. A new model for coaching developing leaders and promoting leader responsibility is proposed. It is based on recent advances in psychoanalytic psychology, and aspects of its theory base and method are illustrated in a case example.

Findings

Development of responsibility is found to hinge on personal value commitments that can best be awakened and cultivated through professionally‐relevant personal development in conjunction with experiential development strategies such as stretch assignments and action learning.

Originality/value

The approach offers a practical, developmental pathway for promoting leader responsibility.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Stacey Swearingen White

This article explores the possibilities of teaching environmental planning by focusing on the sustainability of the campus and the campus master planning process. It…

2438

Abstract

This article explores the possibilities of teaching environmental planning by focusing on the sustainability of the campus and the campus master planning process. It describes the development of an urban planning course centered on campus master planning and its environmental impacts at the University of Kansas. Drawing on existing knowledge of campus planning and campus ecology, the article presents a tentative framework for assessing issues that can affect the structure of a campus environmental planning class, discusses the structure of the University of Kansas course, and outlines the lessons and reflections that have emerged from that course.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Lisa Pike, Tim Shannon, Kay Lawrimore, April McGee, Martin Taylor and Gary Lamoreaux

Instructors at Francis Marion University developed a recycling course in an attempt to satisfy the students’ goals of increasing campus awareness about sustainability and…

9016

Abstract

Instructors at Francis Marion University developed a recycling course in an attempt to satisfy the students’ goals of increasing campus awareness about sustainability and recycling, and the teachers’ goals of using problem‐based learning approaches in class. Students enrolled in the course designed their own experiment, completed the experiment and presented the results at several national meetings. The focal point of the experiment was student apartments, where some students were provided with recycling bins, some were not, and some were provided with both bins and education about the importance of recycling. Results show that students living in campus apartments significantly reduced their waste stream when given recycling bins and some education about recycling. Although ANOVA tests showed that while the presence of recycling education did not result in significantly more recycling, students who received bins (opportunity) recycled more as time went on. Positive student feedback indicated the success of using project‐based learning to teach sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

103

Abstract

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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