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Article

David Nickell and Wesley J. Johnston

Using multi-wave survey data, the authors quantified the financial impact of a sponsorship. The purpose of this paper is to predict the number of new buyers based upon…

Abstract

Purpose

Using multi-wave survey data, the authors quantified the financial impact of a sponsorship. The purpose of this paper is to predict the number of new buyers based upon changed brand attitudes, consistent with a hierarchy of effects model. The authors then established the financial return on the sponsorship spending by estimating the customer lifetime value (CLV) of these new buyers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected the data around a major college football bowl game. Six phases of data collection were used to determine purchasing behavior and brand attitudes of attendees before and after the sponsored event, in comparison to television viewers of the event and the general public. The authors applied Lavidge and Elrick’s (1961) attitudinal constructs as the independent variables in a logistic regression to predict future purchase. The final data collection was used to validate the model’s prediction.

Findings

The findings show that the model accurately predicted the number of new customers after one buying cycle for the sponsor’s products. The authors also quantified the positive impact of the sponsorship on the CLV of existing customers within the same time frame.

Originality/value

The managerial implications of this study are significant. Sponsorships are highly risky, with fixed outlays up front, and unclear benefits to be realized in the future. The authors provide a methodology that not only allows sponsors to measure the effectiveness of the sponsorship, but to determine the return on their sponsorship investment. The authors have taken consumer behavior theory from marketing communications research and combined it with CLV tools, thus allowing marketers to determine the number of new customers that a sponsorship generates, as well as how it influences the buying patterns that drive CLV.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article

Mathias Hasselblatt, Tuomas Huikkola, Marko Kohtamäki and David Nickell

This paper aims to identify a manufacturer’s abilities to develop, build, sell and deliver Internet of Things (IoT) services.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify a manufacturer’s abilities to develop, build, sell and deliver Internet of Things (IoT) services.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a qualitative comparative case method that uses multiple sources of data, including executive interviews and secondary data, to understand a manufacturer’s IoT capabilities.

Findings

Five strategic IoT capabilities were identified: digital business model development, scalable solution platform building, value selling, value delivery and business intelligence and measurement.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations are related to the qualitative research method applied. The results are applicable mainly to relatively large and global manufacturers.

Practical implications

Managers responsible for solution business development can apply the developed model to acquire and manage IoT specific resources, processes and capabilities.

Originality/value

Existing studies have not addressed the IoT-specific resources, processes and capabilities that manufacturers’ possess. This is one of the first studies to conceptualize how these capabilities are used.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article

David Nickell, Minna Rollins and Karl Hellman

This study aims to investigate the marketing actions that companies performed during the Great Recession, and the resulting effect on firms' performance. The purpose is to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the marketing actions that companies performed during the Great Recession, and the resulting effect on firms' performance. The purpose is to discover what marketing actions companies performed, what was the impact to the firm, and why the actions taken either helped them to excel, simply survive, or cease to exist.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a discovery‐oriented approach, consisting of a pilot study, a survey, field interviews and a focus group interview.

Findings

The findings suggest that successful companies invest in current customer relationships by strengthening their key account teams and by working with their clients who are suffering financial difficulties. Successful firms also began implementing new marketing techniques such as social media and crowd‐sourcing.

Originality/value

This study contributes to previous research in marketing that focuses on marketing activities during recessions.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article

Nwamaka A. Anaza, Brian Rutherford, Minna Rollins and David Nickell

– The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between ethical climate and facets of job satisfaction among organizational buyers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between ethical climate and facets of job satisfaction among organizational buyers.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is an empirical study. Data are collected from the industrial buyers using online panel. The INDSALES scale, the scale developed to measure job satisfaction of boundary spanners, was used to measure the job satisfaction. Partial least squares, a components-based structural equation modeling approach, was employed to conduct data analysis.

Findings

The key finding was that buyer’s organizational policy mediates the relationship between buyers’ perception of ethical climate and buyers’ satisfaction with pay and promotion as well as satisfaction with coworkers and supervisors. The findings also show that work satisfaction can be achieved at different levels based on particular components associated to the work environment.

Practical implications

The role of ethical climate in this study offers insights into managers who constantly observe lower levels of job satisfaction among their buying team. Given that companies specify rules and regulations as a way to standardize employee behaviors and prevent unethical practices, managers must ensure that such codes specifically address issue pertaining to compensation, supervision and promotion.

Originality/value

Most of the previous studies in the business-to-business boundary spanning literature address ethical climate primarily from the salesperson’s perspective. Ethical issues relating to organizational buyers in business-to-business setting has largely gone underexplored. This research is one of the few studies that focus on industrial buyers and ethical issues.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article

David Nickell, T. Bettina Cornwell and Wesley J. Johnston

The purpose of this paper is to review the existing literature on sponsorship‐linked marketing and to present a set of research propositions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the existing literature on sponsorship‐linked marketing and to present a set of research propositions.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach to the research propositions was to explore the existing literature to discover areas where opportunities for further research exist.

Findings

The authors propose that not only does sponsorship‐linked marketing influence attitudes towards the sponsor, but that the relationship is that of an S‐shaped curve where the incremental impact of sponsorship is slight for brands with very little or very strong attitudes established towards the brand. The most dramatic influence that sponsorship‐linked marketing will have is for those sponsors with a moderate amount of established brand attitude. The authors also present an argument that extreme congruity or extreme incongruity will drive brand awareness more dramatically than an expected level of sponsor‐property congruity, thus suggesting a U‐shaped relationship between awareness and congruency. Moreover, while an extremely incongruent partnership may gain widespread attention, it is unlikely to positively influence an emotional or behavioral response for either the property or sponsor.

Originality/value

The majority of the previous literature regarding sponsorship‐linked marketing proposed or assumed a linear relationship between current brand attitudes and the impact of a sponsorship. This paper suggests that this relationship is actually non‐linear and is, in fact, an S‐shaped relationship. Further, while congruency was believed to be linearly related to awareness, this paper proposes that the association between awareness and congruency is a U‐shaped phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article

Chiara Cantù, Juho Ylimäki, Charlotta Agneta Sirén and David Nickell

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how technological hubs (THs), defined as knowledge intermediaries, can assist companies in creating successful partnerships to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how technological hubs (THs), defined as knowledge intermediaries, can assist companies in creating successful partnerships to develop innovations. Specifically, the authors ask how THs can help firms connect with horizontal networks and how THs can assist firms on finding suppliers and customers from the vertical network with whom to collaborate. By answering these two main questions, the paper sheds light on the important role of THs and its incubators as knowledge intermediaries in innovation co-creation.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is founded on a longitudinal case study of an Italian technologic hub, ComoNExT, that aims to improve the competitiveness of its local economy. Specific attention is given to the role of the incubator that was formed as a joint effort in the technology hub.

Findings

The authors find that THs can facilitate networking among tenants and among tenants and external actors within the same epistemic network. The TH that the authors studied is characterized by a new business model that is founded on providing value-added services and networking. The TH sustains the networking at different levels: within tenants, with local actors, extra-local and international actors. The authors’ analysis suggest that THs become knowledge intermediaries who allow firms to identify innovation parties and transform them into innovation partners and, thus, outline the shift from outsourced innovation to co-managed innovation.

Originality/value

The paper shows how knowledge intermediaries facilitate the intermediation between heterogeneous organizations who are located at different network positions and characterized by relational proximity that is the basis for reaching effective innovation. The research depicts how knowledge intermediaries reinforce the drivers of a co-membership network to co-create innovation to improve the strength of a relationship characterized by a shared vision.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article

Yan Quan Liu

Librarians have been involved in collecting and disseminating statistics for many years. Utilizing statistics to describe and assess the operation of library activities as…

Abstract

Librarians have been involved in collecting and disseminating statistics for many years. Utilizing statistics to describe and assess the operation of library activities as a part of library tradition has received growing attention from researchers, policymakers, library managers, and professionals. However, few studies have investigated how statistics are used in libraries. This report compares directors’ uses of statistics provided by national agencies in the USA and China to highlight differences and similarities of the uses the two countries’ directors make of statistics and the statistical information that directors find particular useful. The results are intended to provide library administrators with an insight of how library statistics are used in the managerial process and may also help the national statistical providers to obtain an understanding of the characteristics and pattern of use of their products.

Details

New Library World, vol. 102 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article

David A. Hutt, Daniel G. Rhodes, Paul P. Conway, Samjid H. Mannan, David C. Whalley and Andrew S. Holmes

As the demand for flip‐chip products increases, the need for low cost high volume manufacturing processes also increases. Currently solder paste printing is the wafer…

Abstract

As the demand for flip‐chip products increases, the need for low cost high volume manufacturing processes also increases. Currently solder paste printing is the wafer bumping method of choice for device pitches down to 150‐200μm. However, limitations in print quality and stencil manufacture mean that this technology is not likely to move significantly below this pitch and new methods will be required to meet the demands predicted by the technology roadmaps. This paper describes experiments conducted on carriers made from silicon for bumping of die using solder paste. An anisotropic etching process was used to generate pockets in the silicon surface into which solder paste was printed. Die were then placed against the carrier and reflowed to transfer the solder directly to the bondpads. An assessment was carried out of the potential application and limitations of this technique for device pitches at 225 and 127μm.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

Keywords

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