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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Abubakar Garba Bello, David Murray and Jocelyn Armarego

This paper’s purpose is to provide a current best practice approach that can be used to identify and manage bring your own device (BYOD) security and privacy risks faced…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper’s purpose is to provide a current best practice approach that can be used to identify and manage bring your own device (BYOD) security and privacy risks faced by organisations that use mobile devices as part of their business strategy. While BYOD deployment can provide work flexibility, boost employees’ productivity and be cost cutting for organisations, there are also many information security and privacy issues, with some widely recognised, and others less understood. This paper focuses on BYOD adoption, and its associated risks and mitigation strategies, investigating how both information security and privacy can be effectively achieved in BYOD environments.

Design/methodology/approach

This research paper used a qualitative research methodology, applying the case study approach to understand both organisational and employee views, thoughts, opinions and actions in BYOD environments.

Findings

This paper identifies and understands BYOD risks, threats and influences, and determines effective controls and procedures for managing organisational and personal information resources in BYOD.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of this paper is limited to the inquiry and findings from organisations operating in Australia. This paper also suggests key implications that lie within the ability of organisations to adequately develop and deploy successful BYOD management and practices.

Originality/value

This paper expands previous research investigating BYOD practices, and also provides a current best practice approach that can be used by organisations to systematically investigate and understand how to manage security and privacy risks in BYOD environments.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Leslie A. Lytle, Amanda Birnbaum, Kerri Boutelle and David M. Murray

This paper describes a step in exploring the context of health messages within other issues important to families with teenage children. A telephone survey of parents was…

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Abstract

This paper describes a step in exploring the context of health messages within other issues important to families with teenage children. A telephone survey of parents was conducted as part of the formative evaluation for a school and family‐based nutrition intervention with young adolescents. Parents were asked to indicate the frequency with which they talked to their teenage children about a variety of issues, including school and home management issues, wellness issues and health risks. Our results suggest that school and home management issues are more frequently discussed than are health messages. In addition, we saw differences by socioeconomic status (SES) of families. Lower SES families gave more messages overall and gave more priority to messages about health risks as compared to higher SES families. Increasing our understanding regarding family communication with teenagers may help us improve our effectiveness in working with families to reduce health risk factors in youth.

Details

Health Education, vol. 99 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Muhammad Mustofa, Brooke S. West, Mamik Sri Supadmi and Herlina Sari

The purpose of this paper is to present the characteristics of incarcerated women in two prisons in Java, Indonesia and discuss the specific problems and needs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the characteristics of incarcerated women in two prisons in Java, Indonesia and discuss the specific problems and needs incarcerated women with children face with regard to mothering.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey using a semi-structured questionnaire was administered to 399 incarcerated women in two prisons. Focus group discussions provided additional information on mother’s experiences in prison.

Findings

This research finds that children’s welfare was an important concern for mothers while in prison and that they faced various problems in maintaining family ties during their incarceration, including distance, costs and time for family to visit (49.3 percent), and challenges to being able to communicate with family and children (26.6 percent).

Originality/value

This study contributes to the limited research on incarcerated women in Indonesia, broadly, and on mothering and incarceration, in particular, and suggests that women’s needs as mothers have not been taken into consideration by prisons and the criminal justice system.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Peter McKeague and David Thomas

The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the origins and development of national inventories in Scotland and Wales from paper-based records to digital…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a review of the origins and development of national inventories in Scotland and Wales from paper-based records to digital databases. The impact of digital technologies on data management and dissemination is considered.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploring the evolution of historic environment inventories in Scotland and Wales highlights the common issues faced and solutions adopted. In considering the longue durée, the durability and flexibility of information is highlighted.

Findings

Inventories may combine locational, descriptive and visual material to help document a fragile, finite and non-renewable resource. They provide the evidence base for decision making and stewardship in managing change, stimulating interest in and valuing the historic environment. Contribution to recognised inventories should be a requirement for activities documenting the historic environment. Digital technologies shape the expectations of a modern inventory and associated digital archives, with emphasis placed on the repurposing of inventory contents so that they can better contribute to an information network serving multiple audiences.

Social implications

Transformation from paper records to digital data has radically enhanced and democratised access to knowledge about the historic environment. Digital delivery helps place heritage data within mainstream societal activities and fosters public interest and engagement in the historic environment.

Originality/value

Inventories are the foundation building blocks of informed decision making. Digital technologies have transformed these resources to help place the historic environment within mainstream societal activities and interest.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1939

JOHN L. WEIR

I SUSPECT that we praisers of past times, we who walk in spirit with the mighty bookmen of bygone days, are now somewhat in the minority. That being so, it was a…

Abstract

I SUSPECT that we praisers of past times, we who walk in spirit with the mighty bookmen of bygone days, are now somewhat in the minority. That being so, it was a heightened pleasure to hit upon Mr. Phipps Hemming's delightful gossip on Richard Heber in a recent number of the Review. We admire Richard, I make bold to say, far more than we admire the probably more worthy Reginald. Decidedly the former's labours—whether or not pointless and mistaken—deserve not to be forgotten. Father of all the “second copy” and “duplicate” men he undoubtedly was: yet he somehow contrived to leave a healthy tradition behind him. For Richard Heber was no mere accumulator, but an appreciative scholar and a cultured gentleman beside. Long may his name be remembered, even in times when his “three copy” rule has fallen into derision.

Details

Library Review, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2013

David Peetz and Georgina Murray

Purpose – To investigate whether investor interest in climate issues affects the carbon behavior of the corporations in which they may invest (target…

Abstract

Purpose – To investigate whether investor interest in climate issues affects the carbon behavior of the corporations in which they may invest (target corporations).

Methodology/approach – We developed the Finance and Climate Database, merging data on ownership, carbon disclosure, and investor climate interest from several sources, with 30,840 shareholder unit observations. We supplemented analysis of this with interviews.

Findings – Climate-interested investors (CIIs) account for well over a third of the ownership of the world’s very large corporations. More activist CIIs may make a difference to carbon behavior of target corporations where their shareholdings are large enough to enable them to exert power, at or above around 1.5 percent of a target company’s shares. Share price volatility also strongly affects carbon behavior, and the balance of power in investment presently favors the short term over the long term.

Research limitations/implications – More precise proxies for carbon interest and carbon behavior would benefit future research.

Social implications – There is potential for far greater influence by individual CIIs. The most important factor in shifting the balance of power from the short term to the long term would be global agreement on a carbon pricing system.

Originality/value of chapter – This is the first time such a database has been developed or used for this purpose.

Details

Institutional Investors’ Power to Change Corporate Behavior: International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-771-9

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

William L. Wilkie and Patrick E. Murphy

The purpose of this article is to present an inside look at the history of a little‐known but interesting initiative in the marketing field, one that involved the infusion…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to present an inside look at the history of a little‐known but interesting initiative in the marketing field, one that involved the infusion of marketing thought into public policy decision‐making in the USA. It aims to trace the interesting tale of how marketing academics came to be included in the activities of the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) through the FTC's “Marketing Academic Consultancy Program” (MACP) during the 1970s. This story also aims to include descriptions of the contributions made by those marketing academics and how those scholars were later phased out of the FTC.

Design/methodology/approach

An autobiographical approach is used since each of the authors was personally involved in the MACP. As participants in the program and as scholars whose careers were thereafter tremendously affected by that participation, these personal accounts provide considerable insight into the impact on both FTC operations and on marketing academic thought itself.

Findings

Over the decade of the 1970s some 30 marketing academics participated in this program, with considerable impact on both FTC operations and on marketing academic thought itself. Reflecting positive impact within public policy, for example, was a massive increase in the FTC budget for marketing and consumer research activities – from essentially zero at the start of the program to some $ 1 million in 1978. Benefits also flowed back into academia, as this program formed a prime basis for the development of today's “Marketing and Society” research area.

Originality/value

Although there are histories of the FTC, this is an original, first‐hand account of a little‐known era during which marketing academics and public policy decision‐makers were given a unique opportunity to work together and learn from each other. It offers personal insights into the workings of this innovative program and the benefits that accrued for both the FTC and for the marketing discipline.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Peter Hoare

The Librarians of Glasgow University since 1641 are identified, andtheir periods of office summarised and assessed as far as informationallows. The terms of appointment in…

Abstract

The Librarians of Glasgow University since 1641 are identified, and their periods of office summarised and assessed as far as information allows. The terms of appointment in early years and pattern of town and university alternating nominations are outlined, and the gradual development of the post into that of a professional librarian in the twentieth century is illustrated.

Details

Library Review, vol. 40 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Stephen Morrow

– The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the implications of power imbalance and over-emphasis on commercial logic on the structure and governance of Scottish football.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the implications of power imbalance and over-emphasis on commercial logic on the structure and governance of Scottish football.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth analysis of secondary sources is used to identify the logics at play in Scottish football and to explore implications of the liquidation of Rangers for the structure of the game.

Findings

Over-emphasis on commercial logic has led to power being concentrated in two clubs, Celtic and Rangers, and to other clubs and the league itself becoming financially dependent on those clubs. The collapse of Rangers thus threatened the stability of other clubs and the league. The case highlights the challenge of reconciling competing logics and the role played by previously peripheral actors in bringing about change in the field.

Research limitations/implications

The on-going nature of the case, related investigations and legal process meant that it was not possible to supplement the secondary source material with primary evidence.

Practical implications

It demonstrates the multi-faceted nature of elite contemporary football and of the challenges faced by leagues and governing bodies in accommodating logics and multiple stakeholder interests. It also highlights the need for more effective financial regulation of corporate football clubs and their officials and emphasises the importance of inclusive stakeholder governance.

Originality/value

It highlights the risks inherent in football business in small markets dominated by one or a few clubs. It highlights the role that previously peripheral actors can play in bringing about change within a field.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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