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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 September 2021

De-Graft Owusu-Manu, David Mensah Sackey, Dickson Osei-Asibey, Rachelle Kyerewah Agyapong and David John Edwards

The purpose of the study is to investigate the challenges in improving women's energy access, rights and equitable sustainable development from a Ghanaian perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate the challenges in improving women's energy access, rights and equitable sustainable development from a Ghanaian perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The research utilizes a mixed method. A qualitative in-depth exploratory design was chosen to understand how gender is mainstreamed within Ghana's energy sector. This included semi-structured interviews with key managers, experience policy experts and focus groups. The semi-structured interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis (TCA).

Findings

The study reveals that the National Energy Policy of 2010, as the main energy policy regulating the energy sector in Ghana, does make provision for gender equality, safety especially women, in line with Ghana's sustainable development goals. The energy policy aims to empower women and create gender parity in the sector. Nevertheless, the study also found major challenges to gender mainstreaming in the energy sector, including poor analysis in formulating energy policies, inadequate financial resources, and poor monitoring and evaluation.

Originality/value

The paper exposes gender equity challenges associated with the energy sector in Ghana. It also offers a new policy angle which connects gender mainstreaming to sustainable development. The research describes how women are included in developing energy policies and in addressing gender challenges in the energy sector.

Details

Ecofeminism and Climate Change, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2633-4062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2020

De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Thomas Kankam Adjei, David Mensah Sackey, David John Edwards and Reza M. Hosseini

This paper is anchored in a premise of a universal call to action by all UN member states in 2015 to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is anchored in a premise of a universal call to action by all UN member states in 2015 to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity by 2030 within the blueprint of the sustainable development goals (SDGS). The purpose of this study is to mainstream the SDGs in Ghana’s energy sector within the framework of public–private partnerships (PPP): challenges, opportunities and strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review was carried out to explore concepts, theories and frameworks for initiating PPP. Best local and international practices in the implementation of PPP projects; challenges and opportunities in the implementation of PPP projects, strategies for mainstreaming the SDGs in Ghana’s energy sector and assess business action in the implementation of the SDGs in Ghana’s energy sector. The study is situated within the social constructionist philosophical tradition. The qualitative research strategy was adopted as the main methodological choice. Interview guides were used to collect data from respondents in the Accra metropolis.

Findings

Lack of a PPP policy law in Ghana, conflict of interest in PPP projects, excessive government control over projects, cumbersome licensing and legal regime and economic stability were the most significant challenges identified to PPPs. Technology transfer, efficiency gains and mobilization of additional resources for development on the government side where the opportunities for the private sector. Awareness creation, modeling inclusive business with corporate social responsibility (CSR) and SDGs, exploring business opportunities in SDGs such as carbon trading, aligning national policies with SDGs, establishing sustainability units and partnerships with relevant bodies were proposed for mainstreaming the SDGs in Ghana’s energy sector.

Research limitations/implications

It was established from this study that indeed PPPs have a major role to play in unleashing all available forces and prospects toward achieving the SDGs. This paper is constrained to the energy industry in Ghana. It provides a theory-based direction on how companies in the energy sector can contribute to social and economic interventions through a framework of PPP framework within the SGDs. Future research may explore how companies in other sectors may contribute to the sustainability discourse.

Practical implications

This will ultimately lead to additional funding to support government efforts in the implementation of SDGs, honing of sustainable (inclusive) business models, creating an enabling environment for PPPs toward inclusive growth and national development leaving no one behind. It recommended that there should be a national policy and law on PPPs and the private sector should be incentivized to engage government in PPPs implementation for the SDGs. Theoretically, this study contributes to the policy analysis discourse and scaling-up literature on the SDGs.

Originality/value

This study explores the challenges associated with mainstreaming the SGDs in the energy sector from a public–private business perspective. It also offers a new policy, economic and legal regulatory framework that contributes to emerging trends. The outcome of the analyzes advocates for clear business strategies for implementation of the SDG apart from CSR.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

David Mensah Sackey, De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Richard Ohene Asiedu and Adam Braimah Jehuri

Ghana has recently reviewed its renewable energy Act 835 with an objective of providing 10% of its energy from renewables by 2020 (Ackah and Asomani, 2015). Meanwhile…

Abstract

Purpose

Ghana has recently reviewed its renewable energy Act 835 with an objective of providing 10% of its energy from renewables by 2020 (Ackah and Asomani, 2015). Meanwhile, solar Photovoltaic (PV) accounts for less than 2% of the energy mix (Energy Commission, 2018). In combating environmental issues such as climate change and meeting these policy targets, there is the urgent need to increase investment into the renewable sector. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to critically examine the impeding constraints to photovoltaic investment in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The Literature evaluation was carried out of critical constraints surrounding PV investments. Questionnaire was developed and administered online using Google form. Descriptive statistics was used to describe the features of each constraint. In addition, inferential analysis using relative importance index was used to rank these indicators. Again, one sample t-test was used to test the significance of the indicator. Multiple indicators were used to measure the latent constructs. Finally, independent test of mean equity was used to test relationship between the working experiences of despondence who have worked with solar PV below five years and those who worked from five years to ten years.

Findings

The research has highlights high installation and maintenance costs, lack of access to long-term capital finance, access to affordable consumer finance and lack of support to research and development as the major investment obstacles to solar PV investment in Ghana.

Research limitations/implications

It is recommended that the Government of Ghana should provide incentives such as tax waivers, which will encourage entrepreneurs, invest into PV. In addition, it is recommended that solar PV companies must collaborate with financial institutions to provide low interest and flexible consumer financing schemed that can enable home users to purchase the technology. Future research should complement this work by focusing on the impact of domestic currency volatility on PV investment. The scope of this study is constrained to the PV industry in Ghana.

Practical implications

This study will serve as a guide to the private sector business owners to help make critical PV investment decisions. It has also brought to the forefront the reason why solar PV account for a small fraction of Ghana’s energy mix.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to espouse the prevailing constraints to PV investment in Ghana and seeks to contribute to already existing literature that will make profound changes in state policy around PV investment. By understanding these difficulties, driving pointers can be recognized to encourage effective future venture inside the sustainable power source area. In this way, the research leads to a better understanding of the impeding factors that hinders PV investment in Ghana. Again, the paper has achieved new discovery with regards to variations between years of experience with PV use. The variation being less than five years with over five years of PV use. By understanding these difficulties, driving pointers can be recognized to invigorate effective future ventures.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Henry Gyarteng-Mensah, De-Graft Owusu-Manu, David Edwards, Isaac Baidoo and Hatem El-Gohary

Using a discrete choice experiment (DCE), this study aims to better understand the job preference of postgraduate students studying at the Kwame Nkrumah University of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Using a discrete choice experiment (DCE), this study aims to better understand the job preference of postgraduate students studying at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology-Institute of Distance Learning, Ghana and also rank the attributes of a job they deem important.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a positivist epistemological design contextualised within a deductive approach and case study strategy. Primary survey data was collected from a stratified random sample of 128 postgraduate students with multi-sectorial career prospects. Sample students were subjected to a DCE in which their stated preferences were collected using closed-ended questionnaires with 28 pairs of hypothetical job profiles. Respondents’ preferences from the DCE data were then modelled using the conditional logit.

Findings

The research reveals that: salary in the range GHC 2,800.00 to GHC 3,400.00 ($1 = GHS 5.3); supportive management; very challenging jobs; and jobs located in the city were the top attributes that were significant and had the most impact in increasing the utility of selecting a particular job. Interestingly, jobs with no extra hours workload were not significant hence, had a negative impact upon student preferences.

Originality/value

This novel research is the first to use a DCE to better elicit preference and trade-offs of postgraduate students in a developing country towards varying job characteristics that have an impact on their future employment decisions. Knowledge advancements made provide invaluable insight to employers and policymakers on the key criteria that should be implemented to retain the best candidate.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2022

Sakibu Seidu, De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Augustine Senanu Komla Kukah, Michael Adesi, Eric Oduro-Ofori and David John Edwards

The demand for energy infrastructure projects has increased steadily over the last few decades and has come at a high cost. Disruptive technologies (DTs) have the inherent…

Abstract

Purpose

The demand for energy infrastructure projects has increased steadily over the last few decades and has come at a high cost. Disruptive technologies (DTs) have the inherent capability to affect the performance of energy infrastructure projects. Therefore, this research aims to explore the implications of DTs on the performance of energy infrastructure projects.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopts a positivist philosophical position. A quantitative strategy and deductive approach (based on a survey design) guided this study. Sixty-six respondents participated in the study. The study’s population comprised of experts in energy infrastructure projects who possessed a high level of industrial experience including top- and middle-level management of power generation companies. Cochran’s formula was used to select a sufficient sample for the study. Linear regression, one sample test and Cronbach’s alpha were the analytical tools adopted.

Findings

This study established that there is an 18.4% increase in the performance of energy infrastructure projects in Ghana when DTs are applied. In order of importance, DTs improve speed of operations in energy projects; reduce operating cost and enhance efficiency of energy projects; drive sustainable economic development; enhance security in energy projects; and improve environmental sustainability of projects. The study also revealed that e-commerce technologies, renewable energy technologies, three-dimensional printing, bar code technology, photogrammetry, global positioning systems, geographic information systems and nanotechnologies were the topmost ranked DTs with the most impact on the performance of energy infrastructure projects.

Originality/value

This is a novel investigation on the implications of DTs on the performance of Ghanaian energy infrastructure projects. This study’s practical implication is evident in both policy and practice. Energy sector policymakers should endeavour to adopt DTs in their operations to enhance sustainability and performance.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2021

Khotso Dithebe, Wellington Didibhuku Didibhuku Thwala, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa, David J. Edwards, Susan Hayhow and Saeed Talebi

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the use of critical success factors (CSFs) of stakeholder management as a possible solution to reduce disputes experienced…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the use of critical success factors (CSFs) of stakeholder management as a possible solution to reduce disputes experienced because of legal and regulatory issues in public–private partnership (PPP) projects.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper’s epistemological positioning adopted positivism and deductive reasoning to investigate the dispute phenomena on PPP projects. A survey strategy was adopted using a structured questionnaire and closed-ended Likert scales to collate primary data. Questionnaires were distributed to South African construction professionals using both purposive and snowballing non-probability sampling techniques. Data was analysed using summary statistical analysis of the CSFs identified from literature.

Findings

This study revealed that among the 19 CSFs identified, five factors were highlighted that could contribute to the alleviation of disputes between stakeholders in PPP projects, namely, adequate project planning and control; effective leadership; appropriate strategies for the management of stakeholders; confirmation of clear goals and objectives of the project; and effective communication.

Originality/value

The strength of this study lies in the evaluation and use of CSFs of stakeholder management as a possible solution to minimise or even avoid disputes as a result of legal and regulatory issues in PPP projects. By integrating the CSFs, the legal and contractual misconceptions of the PPP initiative are clarified. Such work represents a novel contribution to procurement practice in South Africa and maybe to other countries internationally who are grappling with similar issues.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2022

Dora Yeboah, Masud Ibrahim and Kingsley Agyapong

This study aims to investigate the drivers that motivate employees and guests' hotel service participation to understand how that can influence the implementation of Value…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the drivers that motivate employees and guests' hotel service participation to understand how that can influence the implementation of Value Co-Creation (VCC) in sub-Saharan African context.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an interpretive paradigm, the study draws on 32 in-depth interviews, 6 focus group discussions involving 32 participants and participant observation field notes. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

The study unravels nine motives that drive employee–guest VCC participation: passion, relationship, belongingness, shared and enhanced experiences, satisfaction, reputation development, openness, communication and rewards.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory, cross-sectional study was undertaken in hotels within sub-Saharan Africa. Thus, findings cannot be generalised. However, it provides an opportunity for future quantitative approaches within different contexts involving other stakeholders.

Practical implications

Considering the numerous challenges from COVID-19 pandemic on the service industry, hotel managers might want to use the findings to not only formulate policies that support employee–guest co-creation for service improvement and survival but also introduce enhanced innovative service practices that deliver on employee and guest service expectations for retention. The findings encourage hotel managers to identify employee and guest context-specific motivations to be able to match with value-driven service activities, aimed at attracting positive behaviours to better respond to the numerous COVID-19-related challenges.

Originality/value

This work adds to the VCC literature by investigating the collective and individual drivers at the employee and guest dyadic level within sub-Saharan African hotel context. The authors propose a comprehensive model to guide the successful implementation of employee–guest VCC.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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