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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Martin Kunc, David Menival and Steve Charters

The traditional view of the process of value creation suggests that it occurs inside the firm through its activities or resources. However, there are special cases where…

Abstract

Purpose

The traditional view of the process of value creation suggests that it occurs inside the firm through its activities or resources. However, there are special cases where firms create value using external shared resources, e.g. a territorial brand. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how the combination of both internal and external resources co-create value in wine regions.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth case study of nine firms covering different co-creation processes in Champagne, France. The selection of interviews was designed to cover the diversity of firms within the area with different market positioning. Most firms in the region have been selling champagne for more than 50 years, so they have established long-standing relationships with their markets.

Findings

While there is only one value, Champagne, firms create many different values based on owners’ perceptions with diverse effects on the process of value co-creation in the territorial brand. Some firms have strategies which could deteriorate the value of shared resource. This threat needs institutional changes with unknown consequences on the territorial brand.

Research limitations/implications

The research only involved one case study with a highly developed territorial brand system. There are multiple wine regions that have considered managing either implicitly or explicitly their shared strategic resources (e.g. a territorial brand). Consequently, the findings may not be applicable to all wine regions but it can provide a “gold standard” for regions and wineries that do not realize the impact that their value creation actions can have on the wine region.

Practical implications

Collective management of shared strategic resources, such as a territorial brand, can be a powerful action to sustain competitive advantage rather than individual actions to develop individual brands. However, it can work only with an institutional organization managing the collective process.

Originality/value

The paper offers lessons from a comprehensive and well-known case study where resource bundles co-create value with a territorial brand.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Stephen Charters, David Menival, Benoit Senaux and Svetlana Serdukov

The aim of this study is to consider how key actors in a territorial brand view the creation of value, and how it is balanced between the territorial and individual brands…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to consider how key actors in a territorial brand view the creation of value, and how it is balanced between the territorial and individual brands – using champagne as a means of exploring this.

Design/methodology/approach

The project was exploratory and a qualitative process involving interviews with key actors in the region was adopted.

Findings

Members of the champagne industry adopt a range of views about the nature of value, focusing on image, reputation and perceived quality, but varying between an individualist approach (which considers that value creation lies with the proprietary brands) and a more collectivist perspective, which considers it is predominantly the result of the territorial brand.

Research limitations/implications

Research into the organisation of territorial brands is just beginning; while merely exploratory this research suggests that issues around value merit further consideration.

Practical implications

Actors within a territorial brand need to clearly negotiate how they view value in order to maintain coherence and a common message. They may also need to pay more attention to issues around brand co-creation.

Originality/value

No research in this precise field has previously been carried out and this study highlights variations in the perceptions of key actors within a territorial brand.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Martin Hingley and Adam Lindgreen

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Sarita Ray Chaudhury, Pia A. Albinsson, George David Shows and Virginia Moench

The purpose of this study is to examine, through the lens of entrepreneurial marketing theory, everyday business practices of small-scale winemakers in a challenging small…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine, through the lens of entrepreneurial marketing theory, everyday business practices of small-scale winemakers in a challenging small wine region in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews and participant observations were utilized to elicit rich descriptions of entrepreneurial marketing efforts of six New Mexico winemakers.

Findings

This article describes winemakers’ entrepreneurial marketing efforts. We find that survival drives all other entrepreneurial marketing dimensions where accounting for risk is pervasive rather than a stand-alone dimension. Knowledge gained from intense customer focus is used for new product and service innovations. The leveraging of individual and shared resources is another dimension of entrepreneurial marketing that is demonstrated in our analysis.

Originality/value

As entrepreneurs stake their claim in developing small wine regions, understanding entrepreneurial marketing concepts will enable academics and practitioners to understand challenges of a business that is not only dependent on the economics but also on mother nature’s whims.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Coralie Haller, Isabelle Hess-Misslin and Jean-Paul Mereaux

Several studies in management science have called for a better understanding of the experience economy approach to develop wine tourism. Few studies, however, have…

Abstract

Purpose

Several studies in management science have called for a better understanding of the experience economy approach to develop wine tourism. Few studies, however, have analysed experiential dimensions in the context of French wine-growing regions. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the difference between what wine tourism providers consider relevant in their market offer and what customers expect from their wine tourism experience. A new categorisation of wine tourists’ expectations based on Pine and Gilmore’s (1998) four realms model and Quadri-Felliti and Fiore’s model (2012) are developed.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methodology, qualitatively analysing 17 semi-structural interviews with the main wine tourism stakeholders in the Alsace region in north-east France and quantitatively analysing 233 questionnaires on wine tourists’ expectations and behaviours are adopted.

Findings

The study reveals a difference between experiential offers predicated on an educational approach and the explicit expectations of wine tourists (combining aesthetics, conviviality and authenticity, whose central focus is an encounter with the winemaker). Overall, the findings point to a need for greater inclusion of the experiential aspect in the offer designed for wine tourists.

Originality/value

The study identifies a gap between the educational dimension that professionals tend to promote in their offers and the real expectations of wine tourists who express more interest in the aesthetic dimension provided by an attractive visit environment and an enjoyable experience. At the heart of the authentic experience for wine tourists is meeting the winegrower, making authenticity a major factor.

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2016

Roderick J. Brodie and Maureen Benson-Rea

A new conceptualization of the process of country of origin (COO) branding based on fresh theoretical foundations is developed. This paper aims to provide a strategic…

Abstract

Purpose

A new conceptualization of the process of country of origin (COO) branding based on fresh theoretical foundations is developed. This paper aims to provide a strategic perspective that integrates extant views of COO branding, based on identity and image, with a relational perspective based on a process approach to developing collective brand meaning.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of the literature on COO branding and geographical indicators is undertaken, together with a review of contemporary research on branding. Our framework conceptualizes COO branding as an integrating process that aligns a network of relationships to co-create collective meaning for the brand’s value propositions.

Findings

An illustrative case study provides empirical evidence to support the new theoretical framework.

Research limitations/implications

Issues for further research include exploring and refining the theoretical framework in other research contexts and investigating broader issues about how COO branding influences self and collective interests in business relationships and industry networks.

Practical implications

Adopting a broadened perspective of COO branding enables managers to understand how identity and image are integrated with their business relationships in the context of developing collective brand meaning. Providing a sustained strategic advantage for all network actors, an integrated COO branding process extends beyond developing a distinctive identity and image.

Originality/value

Accepted consumer, product, firm and place level perspectives of COO branding are challenged by developing and verifying a new integrated conceptualization of branding.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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