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1 – 10 of 392
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

David R. Mackay, Graeme L. Altmann and Hamish McMichael

The adoption of electronic commerce strategies is becoming an important means of assisting industries, and indeed whole economies, to gain significant net benefits. The…

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Abstract

The adoption of electronic commerce strategies is becoming an important means of assisting industries, and indeed whole economies, to gain significant net benefits. The extent to which e‐commerce‐based strategies, such as quick response and efficient consumer response, might have an effect on local economies depends in part on how readily they are being adopted. The dominant form of adoption of these strategies is to be found in the business‐to‐business forms of e‐commerce. To be successful, business partners must be in a position to develop customer intimacy through sharing of information, to improve their stock replenishment practices, and enhance their levels of online customer support. This paper presents the initial results of a national survey completed in the retail sector of the Australian economy, that assesses how well Australian industry is responding to these e‐commerce challenges.

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Logistics Information Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

David B. MacKay and Robert F. Easley

Shows that traditional product mapping methods for product positioning analysis fail in international settings due to the high variability of product preferences within…

2613

Abstract

Shows that traditional product mapping methods for product positioning analysis fail in international settings due to the high variability of product preferences within each country and the lack of a common product perception among countries. Shows how explicitly incorporating variation in the product positioning analysis can overcome both of these problems. Uses a comparison of how Japanese and US consumers differ in their perceptions of the gift market for young males to illustrate how the proposed method differs from traditional methods. Indicates that Japanese consumers perceive the gift market much more uniformly than Americans.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2007

J. Weber

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Abstract

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Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Hamish McMichael, David Mackay and Graeme Altmann

The principal objective of this study is to understand the impact that the adoption of quick response (QR) has had on manufacturing firms in the retail supply chain. The…

2377

Abstract

The principal objective of this study is to understand the impact that the adoption of quick response (QR) has had on manufacturing firms in the retail supply chain. The adoption of QR by six organisations within the Victorian textile clothing and footwear industry is used to review the impact that QR is having on the retail sector, especially in terms of the use of EDI as a pipeline accelerator to QR. We also investigate the level of systems integration, organisational affects and inter‐organisational impacts. The results of the research showed that while firms are positively affected by the adoption of QR, and may strengthen their relative competitive positions, retailers are taking the opportunity to shift their holding and distribution costs onto the supply chain to the detriment of both manufacturers and suppliers. Additionally, failure to adopt EDI between downstream trading partners limits the benefits received from QR at the organisational and inter‐organisational levels.

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International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

David Mackay and Malcolm Rosier

Draws on recent research on the impact of electronic data interchange (EDI) on the Australian automotive industry. The often considerable efforts by large corporations…

2606

Abstract

Draws on recent research on the impact of electronic data interchange (EDI) on the Australian automotive industry. The often considerable efforts by large corporations towards the globalization of production and distribution has led such firms (typically multi‐national corporations) to invest in technologies designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their global operations. In this context, one such technology is EDI. Much has been written about EDI and, in particular, the benefits that adopters can expect from using this comparatively simple, facilitating technology. While many authors are quick to extol the virtues of EDI, rarely have they documented the actual benefits and costs to an organization from adoption. Examines the impact of EDI on trading partners in the Australian automotive industry. Research consisted of a longitudinal study (between 1992 and 1994) of all component manufacturers which were supplying components to the large locally‐based multi‐national vehicle assemblers (Ford, General Motors‐Holden (GMH), Mitsubishi and Toyota). It is the component manufacturers who have felt the major impact of their larger customer’s requirements to become EDI capable.The alternative was to cease supplying the automotive industry. Following the establishment of a conceptual model, path analysis was used to analyse support for a number of hypotheses in measuring the extent of benefits to the organization from using EDI. Conclusions so far drawn support the hypothesis that benefits were being achieved depending on the degree of commitment of the organization to issues such as system integration, and level of senior management involvement. A number of suppliers found that despite being forced into EDI adoption, they were obtaining some competitive advantage, and having received new business (e.g. international contracts) partly as a result of being EDI capable.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 26 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2008

David Mackay, Umit Bititci, Catherine Maguire and Aylin Ates

This paper aims to demonstrate the performance benefits of adopting a business process perspective to managing a business and, through grounded research, propose a revised

2222

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate the performance benefits of adopting a business process perspective to managing a business and, through grounded research, propose a revised business process architecture which builds upon recent advances in business process thinking.

Design/methodology/approach

A brief review of business process terminology and architecture is presented. A set of perspectives is developed which is used to structure summary field notes from grounded research conducted in a UK manufacturing plant of a Fortune 500 corporation. A management system model of the case study company is proposed, which in turn is used to modify the existing business process architecture.

Findings

Business management processes are modelled and analysed as observed in the field and compared to recent models of “Manage Processes”. It is discovered that Manage Processes have an architecture which is core to their ability to sustain competitive advantage. It is also shown that adopting a business process architecture perspective when direction‐setting and controlling the business can deliver superior business performance and sustained delivery of value.

Research limitations/implications

The model is developed from grounded research in one organisation only and therefore requires further testing by means of further case studies (although steps are taken to ensure the initial validity of the model). Also, the model is still relatively high level and further case studies should be used to create more detailed practice models for the processes.

Practical implications

The model developed is sufficiently generic to be tested with other organisations, and with the addition of further case studies a useful maturity model workbook could be created. This could aid practitioners in the analysis and improvement of the performance management process from a business process architecture perspective.

Originality/value

This is the first analysis of recent “Manage Process” models from an in‐depth, grounded approach and a new “Manage Process” architecture is proposed.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Umit S. Bititci, Fran Ackermann, Aylin Ates, John Davies, Patrizia Garengo, Stephen Gibb, Jillian MacBryde, David Mackay, Catherine Maguire, Robert van der Meer, Farhad Shafti, Michael Bourne and Seniye Umit Firat

It is argued that whilst operational and support processes deliver performance presently, it is the managerial processes that sustain performance over time. The purpose of…

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Abstract

Purpose

It is argued that whilst operational and support processes deliver performance presently, it is the managerial processes that sustain performance over time. The purpose of this research paper is to better understand what these managerial processes are and how they influence organisational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical background is reviewed covering literature on the subject of business process management, resourced‐based view (RBV), dynamic capabilities and managerial processes. A research framework leads to qualitative case study‐based research design. Data are collected from 37 organisations across Europe, classified according to their performance.

Findings

Findings suggest that the five managerial processes and their constituent managerial activities, identified through the empirical research, influence performance of organisations as an interconnected managerial system rather than as individual processes and activities. Also, the execution and maturity of this managerial system is influenced by the perceptions of the managers who organise it.

Research limitations/implications

Within the limitation of the study the discussion leads to eight research propositions that contribute to our understanding of how managerial processes influence organisational performance. These propositions and ensuing discussion provide insights into the content and structure of managerial processes, as well as contributing to the debate on RBV by suggesting that managerial processes and activities could be considered as valuable, rare and inimitable resources. Furthermore, the discussion on how managerial perceptions influence the organisation and execution of the managerial system contributes towards our understanding of how and why dynamic capabilities develop.

Practical implications

The results suggest that in higher performing organisations, managers: demonstrate a wider awareness of the overall managerial system; achieve a balance between short‐term and future‐oriented activities; exploit their managerial activities for multiple purposes; demonstrate greater maturity of managerial activities; and pay greater attention to the organisation of the managerial system.

Originality/value

This paper presents one of the first empirical studies that attempt to understand how business processes, and particularly managerial processes, as an interconnected managerial system serve to sustain performance of organisations.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

James C. Sarros and Joseph C. Santora

Explores the nature of transformational and transactional leadership among business executives. Comments reveal that most executives believe there are weaknesses as well…

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Abstract

Explores the nature of transformational and transactional leadership among business executives. Comments reveal that most executives believe there are weaknesses as well as strengths with both leadership constructs in practice. Overall, major leadership strengths are in the role modelling, coaching, and consideration behaviors of executives. Major weaknesses are in failure to motivate and challenge workers beyond the expected outcomes. Other facets of each of the four transformational and two transactional leadership behaviors are examined in this article. Lists leadership strategies and approaches for achieving positive results and implications for future research are also provided.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1936

Sir Kingsley Wood, the Minister of Health, speaking at Plymouth on September 15th, said the problem of nutrition was one to which increased attention must be given in the…

Abstract

Sir Kingsley Wood, the Minister of Health, speaking at Plymouth on September 15th, said the problem of nutrition was one to which increased attention must be given in the light of modern scientific knowledge. In all our consideration of it we should not forget the necessity of pure, wholesome food. The consumption of food of all kinds in the United Kingdom had grown considerably. To‐day it was probably over 25 million tons a year. The consumption of dairy products and of eggs, fruit and vegetables, so important to good nutrition, had greatly increased. It was vital to our good health that our food supply should not only be unimpaired by the addition of harmful substances, but that there should be no abstraction from articles of food of their proper qualities. It was only fair that the public should get what they asked and paid for. There had undoubtedly been a considerable improvement in the food standards in this country. It had been achieved largely by the Health Authorities and their professional advisers, as well as producers and manufacturers themselves. Some 60 years ago some 15,000 samples only were submitted to Public Analysts, and over 19 per cent. were found to be adulterated or not up to standard. Last year over 143,000 samples were submitted—the highest on record—and the percentage adulterated or not up to standard was a little over 5 per cent. For a variety of reasons the true percentage of adulterated food was probably less than was indicated in this figure. It could be fairly said that nowadays there was very little gross adulteration or deliberate substitution of one article of food for another. But we still had to be vigilant to see to it that the public had some sort of guarantee that they were getting what they asked for, and that food did not contain ingredients which would render it injurious to health. The consumer's interest must always come first both from the point of view of fair trading and good health. There was also no doubt about the high nutritional value of milk, and we must do all we can to increase the consumption of clean and safe milk.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Cubie Lau, John F Hulpke, Michelle To and Aidan Kelly

The purpose of this paper is to ask whether ethics can be taught? Can we teach how to make decisions in issues involving ethics? Preliminary results suggest we can.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ask whether ethics can be taught? Can we teach how to make decisions in issues involving ethics? Preliminary results suggest we can.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes how managerial ethical decision making is taught using a tool called the JUSTICE framework. Each letter introduces a decision making criterion: J for Justice, U for Utilitarian, S for Spiritual Values, T for TV Rule, I for Influence, C for Core Values, and E for Emergency.

Findings

It is not known if ethics can be taught, but we now believed we can teach our students learn ways to face managerial ethical decisions. What the JUSTICE model lacks in theoretical underpinning it makes up for in pragmatic results. Students learned (memorized) all seven criteria, and learned to select their three favorites, and then to use the model to decide in numerous cases. It works.

Originality/value

The paper introduces the JUSTICE approach.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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1 – 10 of 392