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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1981

David A Kirby and David C Law

This analytical article points to the lack of retail business experience and knowledge which characterises many of the small shopkeepers across this country. It also makes…

Abstract

This analytical article points to the lack of retail business experience and knowledge which characterises many of the small shopkeepers across this country. It also makes clear how far the small independent retailer feels hounded by government and competition and suggests that help may be in order. Also contained here are the results of a pilot survey of prospective purchasers and vendors of small retail units and the article points to the need for further research into the birth and death of small retail businesses.

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Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1978

David Kirby

As Britain's shopping provision becomes increasingly centralised, the small local shop is becoming a rare feature of the retail grocery trade. Dr David A. Kirby examines…

Abstract

As Britain's shopping provision becomes increasingly centralised, the small local shop is becoming a rare feature of the retail grocery trade. Dr David A. Kirby examines the results of a pilot survey to discover the attitudes and opinions of failed retailers. He goes on to suggest that there is a real need for efficient and convenient local stores which may require special concessions from the Government, and certainly an injection of entrepreneurial talent, to survive.

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Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1985

David A Kirby

There is certainly an awareness in this country of the need for training in the retail sector. However, this is directed principally at the needs of the larger retailer…

Abstract

There is certainly an awareness in this country of the need for training in the retail sector. However, this is directed principally at the needs of the larger retailer (cf the articles on training in our May/June issue). David Kirby suggests that little attention is being given to the training needs of the small independent. In this article he outlines a training and advisory programme for village shopkeepers which took place in mid‐Wales, a programme funded in part by the EEC in response to the decline of the village shop in that area.

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Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

David A. Kirby

In the past few years the convenience store has become something of a phenomenon in this country. As a symptom of the polarisation of the UK retail scene, further…

Abstract

In the past few years the convenience store has become something of a phenomenon in this country. As a symptom of the polarisation of the UK retail scene, further development of the convenience store seems inevitable. But David Kirby points out that successful operators will be those who get right both the formula and the location. He sees location as particularly crucial for the convenience store with its dependence on high customer flows and low value transactions.

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Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

Ross L. Davies and David A. Kirby

Despite, or perhaps even because of, the economic uncertainties of the period, the 1970s witnessed a radical transformation of the British distributive system. Most of the…

Abstract

Despite, or perhaps even because of, the economic uncertainties of the period, the 1970s witnessed a radical transformation of the British distributive system. Most of the changes which occurred were similar to those experienced elsewhere in the Western world, and in a review of developments in EEC countries, Dawson has suggested that the impact of these changes on society could be similar to that produced by the Industrial Revolution. In Britain at least, the changes in distribution were, and remain, a result of very marked changes in society: most notably the change in consumption patterns brought about by endemic inflation, increasing unemployment and periodic world energy crises. The result has been increased competition, a search for greater efficiency and diversification of traditional product lines. Thus the British distribution system throughout the 1970s was dominated by the trend to mass merchandising, by the emergence of large firms and a consequent increase of corporate power and by the appearance of new distribution forms. While many of the conditions and developments experienced in the 1970s are expected to continue into the 1980s, it has been predicted (Distributive Industry Training Board 1980) that by the 1990s further revolutionary changes are likely to have occurred, particularly as a result of widespread automation involving new technology. The industry is, therefore, in the middle of a period of very rapid change.

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International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 13 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1979

David A. Kirby

In the UK, per capita expenditure in the DIY market is particularly high, accounting in fact for over a quarter of the European total. And it is an expanding market. The…

Abstract

In the UK, per capita expenditure in the DIY market is particularly high, accounting in fact for over a quarter of the European total. And it is an expanding market. The growth of the home improvement centre has been even more dramatic. But even though heavy price‐cutting and low margins have been characteristic features, there are now signs that the emphasis is swinging away from price and more to choice and service. In this special feature David Kirby looks first at the DIY market as a whole, and then specifically at one of its most thrusting and energetic companies — the Scottish‐based Timberland (with outlets also in England). Currently with 75 stores and a turnover of £14m, they have recently opened a 24,000 sq ft Home Improvement Centre at Kilmarnock.

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Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1980

David A Kirby

The Swedish Co‐op have taken a positive attitude to the problem of small shops with their Narkop group, which has converted their existing shops into modern and relatively…

Abstract

The Swedish Co‐op have taken a positive attitude to the problem of small shops with their Narkop group, which has converted their existing shops into modern and relatively efficient retail units. The project should not be seen solely in economic terms but as a recognition on the part of the Swedish Co‐op that efficiently organised and serviced small shops are an integral feature of the retail system in both economic and social terms. The Co‐op has realised that retailing, after all, fulfils a social as well as an economic function in modern society.

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Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

David A. Kirby and David Mullen

In an era of change and uncertainty, there is a need for employeeswho are both resourceful and flexible. The creation of such competenciesin graduates is the objective of…

Abstract

In an era of change and uncertainty, there is a need for employees who are both resourceful and flexible. The creation of such competencies in graduates is the objective of the UK Training Agency′s recent Enterprise Initiative in Higher Education. This Initiative is reviewed and the outcomes of one project, the Shell Technology Enterprise Programme, which exposes undergraduates, of any discipline, to a period of action learning in a small firm, is explored. In total, the experiences and attitudes of 75 students are examined, together with the views of their employees. The study concludes that, as described in the programme, action learning can help develop the requisite competencies in students, at the same time developing their understanding of business and management. However, to be fully effective, it needs to be incorporated into the undergraduate curriculum.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Wai‐sum Siu and David A. Kirby

Though the authors propose the use of an integrative approach ‐ blending the process model and the contingency approach ‐ to build and advance small firm marketing theory…

Abstract

Though the authors propose the use of an integrative approach ‐ blending the process model and the contingency approach ‐ to build and advance small firm marketing theory, they do not describe the research methodology issues in detail. Thus, this paper reviews the relevant literature on research methodology for small firm marketing and suggests the adoption of a contextual stepwise approach ‐ adopting a co‐ordinated programme of research adjusted in accordance with the situational factors ‐ to examine small firm marketing in more depth. The article outlines a three‐stage contextual stepwise approach to the study of small firm marketing in Hong Kong which is resulting in the addition of new knowledge on the subject and the formulation of a tentative new model of small firm marketing in a non‐western context.

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Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1982

David Kirby

It is a long time now since the major grocery groups — with the possible exception of the Co‐ops — have thought of villages as likely locations. Equally, small shops…

Abstract

It is a long time now since the major grocery groups — with the possible exception of the Co‐ops — have thought of villages as likely locations. Equally, small shops themselves have found the going difficult for reasons which are too obvious to outline. But the decline of the village shop is not only damaging to the retail structure; it leads to serious social deprivation, particularly for the old and those without private transport, and it can also result in a lack of social focus in the community. Recently the Development Commission, together with the National Council for Voluntary Organisations, held a one‐day seminar to discuss possible means of support for the village shop. This is a report of that seminar.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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