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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Barrie Gunter

Television has long been cited by viewers as their primary and most trusted source of news, especially in relation to news of national and international affairs. Aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Television has long been cited by viewers as their primary and most trusted source of news, especially in relation to news of national and international affairs. Aims to explore the issue of trust in the television news.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper combines narrative and analysis. Questions whether public trust in the BBC was damaged by the Hutton inquiry: would the BBC's reputation as the nation's premier news service be tarnished in the longer‐term and had public trust in journalism been severely compromised.

Findings

Events that followed the transmission of a report about the veracity of the government's case for going to war carried by a BBC radio news broadcast on 29 May 2003 called into question the Corporation's competence as a reliable news provider. The story alleged that an informed source had told BBC correspondent Andrew Gilligan that the government had exaggerated the immediacy of dangers posed to the west by Saddam Hussein's weapons of mass destruction. The source who was eventually exposed was a Ministry of Defence expert on Iraq, Dr David Kelly, who later killed himself. The Prime Minister ordered a public inquiry into Dr Kelly's death, led by Lord Hutton, who severely criticised the competence of the BBC's senior management and the quality of its journalism practices. These conclusions prompted the resignation of the Corporation's Chairman and Director General. Hutton's findings had wider implications for the future governance of the BBC and invoked far‐reaching questions about the trust that the public could place in journalism. The evidence indicates that while the public felt that the BBC had been culpable for failing to launch its own internal inquiry into the Gilligan report, the public perceived this incident as a one‐off aberration rather than as being symptomatic of some wider malaise. Indeed, the Hutton inquiry had impacted more upon public trust in the government and led people to question the independence of the Hutton inquiry.

Practical implications

While trust in journalists is far from universal, the public differentiate among journalists in terms of the news organisations they work for. Among these, the BBC remains one of the most widely trusted.

Originality/value

An exploration of the issue of trust in the television news following the Dr David Kelly/Andrew Gilligan report on “The Today Programme” and subsequent Hutton enquiry.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 57 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09564230010310286. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09564230010310286. When citing the article, please cite: David Kelly, Chris Storey, (2000), “New service development: initiation strategies”, International Journal of Service Industry Management, Vol. 11 Iss: 1, pp. 45 - 63.

Details

Library Consortium Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-2760

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

David A. Goldstein and Bryan Kelly

On July 20, 2004, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) published for comment proposed rules under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (the Act), which would…

Abstract

On July 20, 2004, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) published for comment proposed rules under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (the Act), which would require many non‐U.S. hedge fund advisers to be registered with the SEC. The proposed rules would require non‐U.S. investment advisers to look through their hedge funds (U.S. and non‐U.S. funds) to count all U.S. investors therein as clients for purposes of the Section 203(b)(3) “private adviser” exemption. The SEC stated in the proposing release that it did not intend the proposed rules to change current policy of substantially limiting the extraterritorial application of the Act to dealings between a registered non‐U.S. investment adviser and its non‐U.S. clients. However, there remains some ambiguity as to the application of this policy, which has been developed over the past 12 years through a series of no‐action letters. In addition, notwithstanding the SEC’s statement in the proposing release, the proposed rules could be read as changing current SEC policy in a couple of respects. This article explains those issues.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Mary Weir and Jim Hughes

Introduction Consider a hi‐fi loudspeaker manufacturing company acquired on the brink of insolvency by an American multinational. The new owners discover with growing…

Abstract

Introduction Consider a hi‐fi loudspeaker manufacturing company acquired on the brink of insolvency by an American multinational. The new owners discover with growing concern that the product range is obsolete, that manufacturing facilities are totally inadequate and that there is a complete absence of any real management substance or structure. They decide on the need to relocate urgently so as to provide continuity of supply at the very high — a market about to shrink at a rate unprecedented in its history.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2018

Helen J. Waller and David S. Waller

The purpose of this paper is to observe the nature of documentation and the description used in object biographies by an auction house catalogue and an online museum…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to observe the nature of documentation and the description used in object biographies by an auction house catalogue and an online museum collection database in relation opera costumes. This research aims to discuss the issues of cultural and economic value in relation to objects in the art world, and examine examples of object biographies for opera costumes that are sold at an auction and exhibited in a museum.

Design/methodology/approach

The object biographies are compared from an auction house catalogue and the online museum collection database, based on two factors: costumes worn by a famous singer and costumes designed by a famous designer.

Findings

This study identified the valuation methods of auction houses and museums, including accounting for the market value and fair value, as well as social and cultural values. The nature of the documentation also clearly shows the different purpose of the object biographies. For auction houses the biography needs to be short and specific as it provides sufficient information and is read out at the auction, while art catalogues can also be used by experts as part of the conversation to understanding heritage value, and will also be viewed and used by researchers, investors, other auction house specialists and art world professionals.

Research limitations/implications

By comparing two institutions, auction houses and museums, this study has shown that the information that is documented and how it is presented in object biographies is determined by the goals of the institutions. These goals may vary or overlap in providing information, demonstrating cultural importance, to be spoken allowed to an audience and make sales, or to educate, conserve and preserve.

Practical implications

This study shows that to some extent museum online databases display their collection removed from cultural context, with an isolated image of the item, and in an organised, digitally accessible manner. A potential implication is that museums should not only digitally catalogue an item, but also provide discussion and the cultural background and significance of the item.

Social implications

Auction catalogues are written for a specific event (the auction), while the online museum collection database is meant to be a permanent record, which aims to digitally preserve objects and provide access to images and information to a general audience, and further could be edited with amendments or new information when future research or events lead to potential updates.

Originality/value

This study adds to the discourse on approaches to the understanding of costumes as an art object of significance and their potential cultural, economic and heritage value, particularly as represented in the documentation of object biographies.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 74 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Michael P. Kelly, Graeme Martin and Robert J. Pemble

This article is concerned with a description of the way in which a small group of Civil Service trade unionists attempted to participate in the 1981 pay campaign by the…

Abstract

This article is concerned with a description of the way in which a small group of Civil Service trade unionists attempted to participate in the 1981 pay campaign by the British Civil Service trade unions. The problems faced by the group are analysed and the group members' experiences of their activity explored.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Z. David Xia

The purpose of this paper is to discover whether Facebook Groups are conducive for library marketing.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discover whether Facebook Groups are conducive for library marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

Facebook Groups at two major research universities in the USA, along with two global Groups, were analyzed for their activity and membership to examine their performance of effectively promoting library visibility.

Findings

It finds that the success of Facebook Groups can be controlled by the active organization of librarians and by using more general topics to keep discussions alive. It also finds that Facebook Groups should target not only students but also faculty and staff in support of their research and teaching.

Research limitations/implications

By effectively organizing Facebook Groups as useful social networking, libraries can extend their services to more users. The findings of this paper provide insight into a new means of library marketing.

Originality/value

Previous studies on this topic did not analyze the actual activity of specific Facebook Groups. This research is one of the very few, if any, to go into individual groups and examine several important aspects of messages and members in these Groups.

Details

Library Management, vol. 30 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Tony Kinder

The paper argues that some conventional tools guiding innovation processes inadequately analyse problems arising from blending telematics with public service integration…

Abstract

The paper argues that some conventional tools guiding innovation processes inadequately analyse problems arising from blending telematics with public service integration in areas of complex service provision. Also uses Molina’s diamond of alignment, and Nicoll’s contextual usability conceptual approaches to analyse a case study on the introduction of smart housing in West Lothian, Scotland.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

David Kelly and Chris Storey

This paper addresses the issue of initiating new service development (NSD) projects. The aim of the article is to investigate whether firms use systematic procedures to…

Abstract

This paper addresses the issue of initiating new service development (NSD) projects. The aim of the article is to investigate whether firms use systematic procedures to generate and screen ideas for new services. Utilising a survey of marketing managers in UK service companies, data were collected in the areas of NSD strategy, idea generation and screening. It was found that only half the sample have a formal NSD strategy, idea generation is undertaken on an ad hoc basis and idea screening, although more prevalent, is failing to support the NSD strategy. Management implications and areas for further research are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 February 2001

Abstract

Details

Postmodern Malpractice: A Medical Case Study in The Culture War
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-091-3

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