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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

David J. DiRusso, Susan M. Mudambi and David Schuff

Despite the availability of side‐by‐side price comparisons, online retailers often charge very different prices for the same product. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the availability of side‐by‐side price comparisons, online retailers often charge very different prices for the same product. The purpose of this paper is to identify the drivers of price differences in an online retail marketplace by examining pricing information from a sample of sellers in the market.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical, quantitative research study of Amazon Marketplace, using 498 observations of online sellers of a variety of electronics products was conducted. A regression analysis is employed to determine the drivers of these sellers' prices.

Findings

The results provide a set of factors associated with deviation from the mean price Amazon Marketplace retailers charge for a given product. The authors find that online retailers that charge higher prices post additional channels of customer service, post their return policy, have lower reputation scores, display a retail brand logo, offer more products, and are not electronic specialists.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the theoretical understanding of the effects of information quality and governance structures on prices. This is the first study to focus on these issues in an online marketplace setting.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Elodie Sellier, Sandra David‐Tchouda, Gaëlle Bal and Patrice François

This article aims to analyze morbidity and mortality conferences (M&MCs) in a university‐affiliated hospital, notably their format and progression since the 1990s.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to analyze morbidity and mortality conferences (M&MCs) in a university‐affiliated hospital, notably their format and progression since the 1990s.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐sectional study was conducted and M&MC characteristics were collected using three methods: a questionnaire to all department heads to identify past M&MCs; semi‐structured interviews with each M&MC leader; and when available, meeting reports were analyzed.

Findings

Of 189 questionnaires sent to department heads, 105 were completed and returned (55.6 per cent). A total of 27 M&MCs were identified; five times more than in 1994. The M&MC format varied greatly between departments. In surgical units, cases per conference tended to be higher than in intensive care or medical units and paramedical staff were invited less often. Compared with 1998, head nurses (70.4 vs 27.3 percent, p=0.03) and paramedical staff (63.0 vs 18.2 percent, p=0.03) attendance increased significantly. Physicians considered M&MCs important for improving service quality, patient safety and enhancing team cohesion.

Research limitations/implications

Patient outcomes were not assessed.

Practical implications

Although undefined formats allowed leaders to conduct M&MCs according to their objectives, how these conferences are conducted should impact healthcare quality and safety.

Originality/value

Results indicate that M&MCs have evolved over the past 20 years, showing them to be valuable quality and safety improvement methods.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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