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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Judy Hutchings and Frances Gardner

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selective, UK‐focused review of recent literature on effective interventions for preventing and reducing conduct problems in 3‐8…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selective, UK‐focused review of recent literature on effective interventions for preventing and reducing conduct problems in 3‐8 year olds; and to update the chapter in the Sutton et al. (2004) research report Support from the Start on effective interventions for children aged 3‐8.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors provide a narrative review of the risk factors for conduct disorder.

Findings

The review describes risk factors for conduct disorder in this age range and presents an approach to selecting effective programmes. It describes some of the better quality evidence‐based interventions in this age range that have been disseminated and successfully implemented in the UK.

Originality/value

The review provides an update of the accumulating evidence for interventions aimed at preventing and reducing conduct problems in the 3‐8 year old age group. It introduces innovative models designed for service delivery and examines lessons learned from implementation of these programmes. The paper provides recommendations that paper can be used by service providers to help make informed decisions and offer effective programmes to families.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

David Hutchings

Currency fluctuations have a significant impact on occupational and investment property markets. The performance of an international portfolio would be strongly influenced…

Abstract

Currency fluctuations have a significant impact on occupational and investment property markets. The performance of an international portfolio would be strongly influenced by the changes seen in the exchange rate of the investor and in the country of their investments. Occupational costs meanwhile vary considerably as a function of currency movements as well as rental growth. A single currency would reduce this risk. The changing economic conditions necessary to deliver a single currency are however of greater importance than the denomination of money. Examines the general concept of a single currency, rather than the specific design and implementation of the Euro as currently envisaged. There are clearly some concerns as to the stability of the proposed new European currency. If extreme, these could outweigh the advantages indicated in this research, particularly over the shorter term. Modelling capital growth and yields demonstrates the importance of exchange rates as a function of monetary policy and economic behaviour. A single currency could allow yield premiums to fall in more volatile markets as economic conditions converge, as has already been seen in bond markets. It would highlight the pricing of property as a function of fundamental demand and income security and could facilitate a more sophisticated valuation and investment appraisal practice in Europe. If EMU goes ahead it will lead to new occupational patterns and areas of investment growth. As such it is likely to generate tenant and investor activity as the most efficient and competitive locations are sought out.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2018

Sarah Minty

Young people’s choice of higher education institution and subject are often assumed to take place in a social vacuum, ignoring the influence of family and friends. Despite…

Abstract

Young people’s choice of higher education institution and subject are often assumed to take place in a social vacuum, ignoring the influence of family and friends. Despite a shift away from state funding of undergraduate higher education towards a cost-sharing model (Johnstone, 2004), little research has been carried out on family attitudes to debt, particularly in Scotland where home students do not pay tuition fees. This chapter explores how higher education decisions are made by Scottish domiciled students in the context of their families and the ways in which such decisions are mediated by social class.

Details

Higher Education Funding and Access in International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-651-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

This article has been condensed from a recorded interview with F G B Hutchings—one of a series in which librarians past and present discuss themselves and their…

Abstract

This article has been condensed from a recorded interview with F G B Hutchings—one of a series in which librarians past and present discuss themselves and their professional experience, undertaken and prepared by the College of Librarianship Wales. The interviewer is David Gerard, whose contributions are printed in italic type.

Details

New Library World, vol. 78 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Abstract

Details

International Perspectives on Gender and Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-886-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Kate Hutchings and David Weir

To explore the implications of internationalisation for guanxi and wasta and the role of trust, family and favours in underpinning these traditional models of networking…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the implications of internationalisation for guanxi and wasta and the role of trust, family and favours in underpinning these traditional models of networking. The paper also draws some implications for management development professionals and trainers.

Design/methodology/approach

The argument is based on relevant literature and cases, and the authors' own knowledge acquired through research in China over 8 years and the Arab World over 25 years. The Chinese research involved analysis of company reports, informal conversations and semi‐structured interviews conducted with almost 100 interviewees including Western expatriate managers and local Chinese managers between 1998 and 2005 in Shanghai, Beijing, Suzhou and Wuxi. The Arab research also involved analysis of company reports and informal conversations, as well as interviews and surveys conducted throughout the Middle Eastern region, including the GCC states, Algeria, Jordan, Libya, Palestine and Yemen.

Findings

The research finds differences in the continuing relevance of guanxi and wasta and suggests that while guanxi is adapting to internationalisation, wasta remains traditional in its influence on business and social life.

Practical implications

The paper suggests the need for increased training of international managers to adjust to culture‐specific networking in China and the Arab World and provides some practical guidelines to managers to assist their intercultural effectiveness in these two regions of the world.

Originality/value

The research is important in that it extends knowledge of traditional networking practices in exploring the Arab World which is hitherto under‐researched and in undertaking comparative examination of China and the Arab World which is also a new area of research.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Maria Bastida, Luisa Helena Helena Ferreira Pinto and Anne-Wil Harzing

The expatriation literature has developed an insightful body of research on the reasons why women are not assigned abroad as frequently as men. However, the authors know…

Abstract

Purpose

The expatriation literature has developed an insightful body of research on the reasons why women are not assigned abroad as frequently as men. However, the authors know very little about the systemic and recursive consequences of women's underrepresentation in international assignments (IAs), which are examined in this conceptual paper.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon expatriation research and a system dynamics perspective, the authors propose a conceptual model to explain both women's underrepresentation in IAs and its recursive consequences.

Findings

The authors highlight how women's underrepresentation in IAs results from a complex system of recursive effects that jeopardizes women's professional development and undermines both their own career progression to top management and firms' competitive advantage and international growth. The authors argue that organizations make decisions that contravene their own interest in a competitive global context. First is that they are limiting their talent pool by not considering female candidates. Second is that they are missing the opportunity to use IAs to advance women's careers.

Research limitations/implications

The model provides a solid grounding for future research on selecting the most effective organizational actions and designing supportive measures to disrupt the persistent dynamics contributing to women's underrepresentation in IAs. Future research could also expand our study by incorporating individual differences and the proactive role that women may take.

Practical implications

The model points to specific managerial interventions (e.g. increased access to job training and specific training ahead of the assignment, dual-career support, women's mentoring and affirmative action) which have the potential to reduce women's underrepresentation in IAs and in top management.

Originality/value

The system dynamics approach enables a broader understanding of why women are underrepresented in IAs, how this underrepresentation further exacerbates gender segregation in international business, and how these recursive outcomes can be averted to the advantage of firms' sustainable growth.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 September 2015

Andrew Morrison

This chapter discusses how Nancy Fraser’s theory of two-dimensional participatory justice may be employed in research concerned with inequalities within higher education…

Abstract

This chapter discusses how Nancy Fraser’s theory of two-dimensional participatory justice may be employed in research concerned with inequalities within higher education. The main concepts of Fraser’s theory are discussed and evaluated in the light of the critical attention they have attracted. Following that, I demonstrate the empirical application of Fraser’s ideas through discussion of extracts of data from a recent small-scale investigation undertaken within a UK-based higher education institution. Finally, I conclude by discussing the strengths of Fraser’s concepts with some indications for future research.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-287-0

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 14 December 2015

He replaces the little known David van Rooyen, who had been in post for only four days following the axing of technocrat Nhlanhla Nene. The nature of the latter's removal…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB207298

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

David McGuire, Rune Todnem By and Kate Hutchings

Achieving intergenerational interaction and avoiding conflict is becoming increasingly difficult in a workplace populated by three generations – Baby Boomers, Generation…

Abstract

Purpose

Achieving intergenerational interaction and avoiding conflict is becoming increasingly difficult in a workplace populated by three generations – Baby Boomers, Generation X‐ers and Generation Y‐ers. This paper presents a model and proposes HR solutions towards achieving co‐operative generational interaction.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adapts Park's theory of race relations to explain the distinctiveness of generational work groups and the challenges and opportunities that these groups present when interacting in organisations. Rashford and Coghlan's cycle of organisational change, based on the Kübler‐Ross grief cycle, is then mapped onto Park's race relations cycle in order to link generational interaction to emotional reactions to change over time.

Findings

The paper sets out a research agenda for examining how generations interact in the workplace. It acknowledges the limitations of using Park's theory of race relations, in particular the criticisms levelled at assimilationist approaches.

Originality/value

The paper provides an alternative viewpoint for examining how generations co‐exist and interact and shows how HR solutions can respond to the needs of different generations.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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