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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

David H. Taylor

The Demand Amplification Effect has been well described in the literature over many years, yet it is clear that the effect is still prevalent in many supply chains. In…

Abstract

The Demand Amplification Effect has been well described in the literature over many years, yet it is clear that the effect is still prevalent in many supply chains. In this paper, a practical approach is described for identifying and measuring demand amplification. The approach was applied within the upstream automotive component supply chain in the U.K. The causes of demand amplification within this scenario are analyzed and compared to those identified in previous work. The work described is the first part of a wider project, the aim of which is to develop a comprehensive approach to enable management to counteract the problem of demand amplification.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2015

Claudia Gomez, B. Yasanthi Perera, Judith Y. Weisinger, David H. Tobey and Taylor Zinsmeister-Teeters

The immigrant entrepreneurship literature indicates that immigrant entrepreneurs reap numerous benefits from their co-ethnic communities℉ social capital. These benefits…

Abstract

The immigrant entrepreneurship literature indicates that immigrant entrepreneurs reap numerous benefits from their co-ethnic communities℉ social capital. These benefits, however, often come at a price because scholars note the potential for this community social capital to impose limitations on the entrepreneurs. While the literature largely focuses on the benefits of social capital, there is no research on what motivates the immigrant entrepreneurs to engage with their co-ethnic community in terms of contributing to, and utilizing, their co-ethnic communities℉ social capital, and the consequences these may have on their enterprises. Addressing this gap in the literature is important in the development of successful immigrant enterprises. Thus, based on a model posited by Portes and Sensenbrenner (1993), we suggest that immigrant entrepreneurs℉ motivations will influence their use of, and contributions to, co-ethnic community social capital, impacting, in turn, business success. We contribute to both the immigrant entrepreneurship and social capital research through exploring how entrepreneurs℉ motives, with respect to their co-ethnic communities℉ social capital, influence business success.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

David H. Taylor and Susan Probert

Presents the results of a survey of 52 UK‐based manufacturingcompanies to analyse the supply chain problems faced by the companies inrelation to serving European markets…

Abstract

Presents the results of a survey of 52 UK‐based manufacturing companies to analyse the supply chain problems faced by the companies in relation to serving European markets. On the basis of the research a typology of supply chains has been developed and firms classified accordingly. Results show that, to the majority of companies, basic operational issues are of paramount importance and few are giving consideration to the broader strategic issues of European supply chain management.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

David H. Taylor

To show how value chain analysis techniques have highlighted opportunities for strategic change in a UK agri‐food supply chain and to present an initial model of an…

Abstract

Purpose

To show how value chain analysis techniques have highlighted opportunities for strategic change in a UK agri‐food supply chain and to present an initial model of an integrated supply chain based on the application of lean principles.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports on action research carried in two red meat industry supply chains, each of which spanned the whole chain from farm to consumer. Both of these case studies involved teams of managers from the companies in the chains together with facilitation by the researcher.

Findings

The paper builds on existing theoretical work to show that value chain analysis methods combined with lean principles can provide a powerful framework for the analysis and improvement of supply chain activity.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on case studies of only two supply chains both of which were related to pork products. It would be beneficial if further studies could be undertaken of other agri‐food chains in meat and in other sectors, to further validate the findings and recommendations.

Practical implications

A tentative model is proposed as the basis for the development of an integrated red meat supply chain Obstacles to the achievement of more efficient, integrated supply chains are highlighted and possible approaches to overcome these obstacles are suggested.

Originality/value

The paper provides detailed suggestions as to the strategic implications and potential commercial benefits of adopting an integrated approach to the management of UK agri‐food supply chains The paper should be of value both to researchers in this area and to senior managers who are responsible for the strategic development of agri‐food supply chains.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

David H. Taylor and Andrew Fearne

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the problems with demand management in fresh food value chains and to propose a framework for demand analysis and improved demand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the problems with demand management in fresh food value chains and to propose a framework for demand analysis and improved demand management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on empirical evidence from multiple case studies undertaken in the UK food industry.

Findings

Evidence from the case studies indicates a consistent misalignment of demand and supply, due to demand amplification, poor production systems and inconsistencies with information and data handling procedures.

Research limitations/implications

The case study evidence is limited to the UK context and is therefore unlikely to be representative of the global situation in fresh food value chains. The proposed framework is based on the case study evidence but has not been formally tested.

Practical implications

More collaboration, information sharing and joint planning from primary production through to retailing is critical if fresh food value chains are to function efficiently and effectively in retail environments where promotional activity creates significant uncertainty.

Originality/value

Demand management has received little attention to date, outside the industry framework of ECR. This paper is the first to propose a framework for improvement based on greater collaboration and joint planning that extends beyond the retailer‐manufacturer interface

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

David H. Taylor and Andrew Fearne

To highlight the problems with and propose a framework for improving demand management in retail food supply chains.

Abstract

Purpose

To highlight the problems with and propose a framework for improving demand management in retail food supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on empirical evidence from multiple case studies and develops a framework for improvement in demand management for retail food supply chains.

Findings

Analysis of the characteristics of demand within a number of retail food supply chains demonstrates a propensity for misalignment of demand and supply due to issues such as demand amplification, inappropriate production policies and inconsistencies with information systems and data handling procedures.

Research limitations/implications

The case study evidence on which the conceptual framework is based is drawn exclusively from the UK, where retail food supply chains are generally more mature than in other parts of the world. The proposed framework is based on empirical evidence but has not been formally tested.

Practical implications

More collaboration, information sharing and joint planning beyond the manufacturer‐retailer interface is critical if retail food supply chains are to function efficiently and effectively in retail environments where promotional activity creates significant uncertainty.

Originality/value

Demand management in retail food supply chains has received little attention from supply chain researchers to date. This paper proposes a framework for improvement based on greater collaboration and joint planning from farm to fork.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

David H. Taylor

To develop an innovative methodology to apply lean value chain improvement techniques to a complete supply chain for a food product from farm to consumer.

Abstract

Purpose

To develop an innovative methodology to apply lean value chain improvement techniques to a complete supply chain for a food product from farm to consumer.

Design/methodology/approach

Action research based on a UK case study involving farmers, a food processor and a major retailer.

Findings

Value stream analysis (VCA) highlights significant opportunities to improve supply chain performance, profitability and relationships.

Research limitations/implications

Lean/VCA methodologies can be readily applied to the retail and processor elements of food chains. However, further research is required to apply the concepts to farm operations.

Practical implications

Subsequent to this research, VCA techniques have been increasingly adopted in UK agri‐food sectors including meat, dairy, cereals and horticulture.

Originality/value

Application of lean concepts and VCA in the agri‐food sector. Development of a multi‐echelon supply chain improvement methodology.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 35 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

David H. Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from a major UK research project covering six agri‐food supply chains, each spanning from farm to consumer.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from a major UK research project covering six agri‐food supply chains, each spanning from farm to consumer.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper gives an overview of relevant literature out of which three research questions are posed. The research methodology is then outlined, followed by an overview of the methods used to collect and analyse the case study data. A summary of the research findings is then presented followed by a discussion of the findings in the context of the research questions. The paper concludes with an assessment of the validity of the research followed by some tentative suggestions regarding the need for, and potential benefits of, improving demand management in agri‐food chains.

Findings

The research has found that demand management is an area, which in practice is beset by difficulties and inefficiencies, which in turn affects the operational performance of the supply chains. Analysis of the characteristics of demand along the chains demonstrates a propensity for misalignment of demand and activity due to issues such as demand amplification and inappropriate production policies. The paper also identifies a number of operational inefficiencies and inconsistencies, which typically occur in the information systems and data handling procedures within these chains.

Originality/value

Suggestions are given as to how demand management processes could be improved through cooperative efforts across the supply chain.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

David H. Taylor

Reviews the structure, characteristics and problems of food supplylogistics in the Russian Republic and other former Soviet states.Examines the structural causes of food…

Abstract

Reviews the structure, characteristics and problems of food supply logistics in the Russian Republic and other former Soviet states. Examines the structural causes of food short‐ages, followed by a description of changes in food supply systems since the introduction of free market policies. The major part of the report is devoted to an analysis of the logistical problems in the food supply chain from food production, through processing, storage and transport.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

David H. Taylor

The demand amplification effect has been well described in the literature over many years. This paper reports the results of a research project carried out in the UK…

Abstract

The demand amplification effect has been well described in the literature over many years. This paper reports the results of a research project carried out in the UK automotive component supply chain, which set out to eliminate the effect in practice. The paper describes the progression from the identification of demand amplification, through a practical approach for its measurement, to the development of a methodology to overcome the negative impacts of the effect across three echelons of the supply chain. The results of a six‐month trial implementation are reported.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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