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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Carina Roemer, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele, Bo Pang, Patricia David, Jeawon Kim, James Durl, Timo Dietrich and Julia Carins

Females are underrepresented in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), both in the workforce and in universities. Low self-efficacy and limited access to…

Abstract

Purpose

Females are underrepresented in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), both in the workforce and in universities. Low self-efficacy and limited access to role models are key factors preventing retention of female STEM students enrolled in university degrees. This paper aims to report on one social marketing pilot programme that was co-designed to increase self-efficacy in females currently enrolled in STEM programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

The Co-create, Build and Engage (C-B-E) framework was applied. Process and outcome evaluations were conducted using a repeated measure design to assess pilot programme effectiveness.

Findings

A significant increase in self-efficacy and high satisfaction rates were observed for STEM students that attended the bias literacy workshop. Social advertisements raised awareness for available STEM specific university services.

Originality/value

This paper outlines the application of the C-B-E framework. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study delivers the first scientific paper reporting an outcome evaluation for a social marketing programme seeking to retain women enrolled in university STEM degrees.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Carina Roemer, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele and Patricia David

Social marketing theories have habituated to a theoretical and methodological focus that is criticised for being myopic and stigmatising. Following recommendations to…

Abstract

Purpose

Social marketing theories have habituated to a theoretical and methodological focus that is criticised for being myopic and stigmatising. Following recommendations to redirect focus theoretically, the purpose of this paper is to apply an observational methodology to understanding how project stakeholders interact to examine whether consideration of stakeholders can identify factors facilitating or impeding farming practice change.

Design/methodology/approach

More than 48 events involving as many as 150 people including project stakeholder meetings, one-on-one consultations and annual events were observed over more than 100 h by between one and five researchers. Field notes were gathered, and thematic coding focussed on understanding how stakeholders facilitated or impeded practice change.

Findings

Observations identified limited provision of information about the project by on ground project stakeholders to targeted individuals (farmers). On the rare occasions where information sharing was observed, communication was delayed making it difficult for individuals to connect actions with outcomes observed. Participating stakeholders did not freely support delivery of activities needed for individual practice change.

Practical implications

This study indicates the value of wider process and outcome assessment encompassing stakeholders to identify factors impeding and facilitating farming practice change.

Social implications

Approaches that centre attention on individuals fail to acknowledge the inputs, activities and outputs delivered by project stakeholders within a system of change. By redirecting evaluation focus, shared responsibility is gained and stigmatisation of one stakeholder group can be avoided.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates how observations can be used to redirect focus to consider actions and interactions occurring between on ground project stakeholders. A stakeholder evaluation approach extends monitoring and evaluation focus beyond individuals targeted for behaviour change. Implications, limitations and future research directions are outlined.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 January 2018

Philip Baron, David Griffiths and Ben Sweeting

Abstract

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 46 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Abstract

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

David Griffiths

The education system worldwide is regulated through the dominant paradigm of planning and enactment, but the representations of curricula and lesson plans underpinning the…

Abstract

Purpose

The education system worldwide is regulated through the dominant paradigm of planning and enactment, but the representations of curricula and lesson plans underpinning the paradigm are poorly correlated to classroom practice. This paper aims to understand how despite this the paradigm remains dominant and explores the implications of its continued success for the current educational practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Bateson's concept of the economy of flexibility is applied to the education. Genetic control is mapped onto the formal specification of learning activities, while somatic control is mapped onto teachers' improvisatory practice. The conflicting regulatory messages generated within the dominant paradigm are discussed in terms of Bateson's double bind theory.

Findings

The success of the dominant paradigm is comprehensible when conceived of as an economy of flexibility. However, the analysis indicates that this success is dependent on two conditions: that sufficient flexibility is maintained in classroom practice, and that there should be a weak but reliable channel whereby innovations in classroom can filter through to the level of planning. Current developments in educational technology and management practice threaten both these conditions, by increasing the ability of managers to monitor educational activities, and by providing technocratic solutions to pedagogic questions. Flexibility is squeezed out of the system, and the contradictions of the dominant paradigm are increasingly enforced to place teachers in a double bind.

Originality/value

The analysis provides a model for relating the problems experienced by teachers in their practice to changes in technology, policy and institutional organisation.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 42 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

David Griffiths and Ranulph Glanville

Abstract

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 42 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Phillip D. O'Shea, Andrew C. Worthington, David A. Griffiths and Dionigi Gerace

There is conjecture that small and mid‐cap companies in highly speculative industries use frequent and repetitive disclosure to promote price volatility and heighten…

Abstract

Purpose

There is conjecture that small and mid‐cap companies in highly speculative industries use frequent and repetitive disclosure to promote price volatility and heighten market interest. Excessive disclosure could indicate instances of self‐promotion or poor disclosure practices, and these habits could mislead investors. The purpose of this paper is to quantitatively investigate the impact of firm disclosure on price volatility in the Australian stock market.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper considers the effect of information disclosure on the daily stock price volatility of 340 Metals & Mining industry entities listed on the Australian Securities Exchange over the period 2005‐2007 using regression analysis.

Findings

The results indicate the number of disclosures, the number of price and non‐price sensitive disclosures and the number of disclosures by category has a significant influence on daily price volatility. Moreover, the volatility impact of disclosure is greater for small and mid‐sized firms than large firms.

Research limitations/implications

Price volatility is calculated using daily data; intra‐day stock prices could provide measures that are more accurate. There is also no attempt to allow for asymmetry in disclosure; categorizing news as “good” or “bad” would allow better insights.

Practical implications

There is support for the conjecture that disclosure could serve as a self‐promotion tool through fabricated and repetitive announcements. Inadvertent poor disclosure practice could also result in excessive price volatility. Disclosure practice requires ongoing consideration by regulatory bodies.

Originality/value

This analysis complements basic work by the Australian regulator to establish a quantitative link between disclosure practice and price volatility.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Victor Ronald David MacGill

The dominant paradigms of the world today are reductionist and linear and have led us towards crises in the environment, economics, health and more. Cybernetics is one…

Abstract

Purpose

The dominant paradigms of the world today are reductionist and linear and have led us towards crises in the environment, economics, health and more. Cybernetics is one alternative paradigm, which moves beyond reductionist thought. The paper aims to investigate cybernetics and how it might move from a paradigm to a way of living. A cybernetic worldview enables us to see ourselves as partners in dynamic co-creative processes reaching beyond dualities. To live by such a life requires courage. This paper concentrates on how cybernetics principles may be applied on an individual basis to provide a more holistic way of coping with the challenges of everyday life in the early twenty-first century. The author sees how he can live a balanced life, cope with uncertainty, live with courage, move beyond dualities and develop a breadth of knowledge to help us navigate the events of the lives.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a brief outline of some cybernetic principles and how they might be transferred to a cybernetic lifestyle. The focus is on how the author might integrate cybernetic principles into the individual life on a day-to-day basis.

Findings

Breadth of knowledge, moving beyond dualities, the observer, living with courage, uncertainty and living a balanced life are discussed from a cybernetic viewpoint.

Practical implications

It gives cyberneticians cause to consider their lives and how cybernetic principles help them in everyday life.

Social implications

The more cyberneticians exhibit cybernetics principles in their life, the more it will be noticed by those around them.

Originality/value

The approach of this paper is about cybernetics as an individual lifestyle rather than a more generalised examination of the role of cybernetics.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 42 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

David Griffiths and Ranulph Glanville

Abstract

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 42 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

David Gunsberg, Bruce Callow, Brett Ryan, Jolyon Suthers, Penny Anne Baker and Joanna Richardson

The purpose of this paper is to identify the baseline model required to measure whole-of-organisation agility within a university information services division. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the baseline model required to measure whole-of-organisation agility within a university information services division. The paper seeks to analyse the process of identifying and applying such a model.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative methodology applied is that of a single case study. The organisation analysed was an Australian university’s information services division. A structured survey, based on Wendler (2014), was administered to all staff as part of a multi-phased approach, thus facilitating a triangulation process.

Findings

The current research has confirmed the applicability of Wendler’s model to the higher education information technology sector. Application of the model establishes not only a baseline agility maturity score across the whole-of-organisation but also provides granular scores based on organisational units. Triangulation of survey results is recommended to achieve a more in-depth perspective.

Research limitations/implications

Further research comparing similarly and differently sized universities could provide valuable insights. More research is needed to extend the applicability of Wendler’s model to a wider range of domains and industries.

Practical implications

The grouping of survey questions under particular broad themes reflected the strategic focus of the division being surveyed. Organisations implementing the proposed model will need to select themes that correspond with their respective strategic goals and culture.

Originality/value

The paper has extended the research and resultant model developed by Wendler by applying them not only to both managers and staff but also to a different domain, specifically higher education.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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