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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Jannifer Gregory David

This research examines how job seekers' levels of harmonious work passion (HWP) and obsessive work passion (OWP) affect the importance job seekers place upon job and…

Abstract

Purpose

This research examines how job seekers' levels of harmonious work passion (HWP) and obsessive work passion (OWP) affect the importance job seekers place upon job and organizational elements in recruiting messages.

Design/methodology/approach

Employees who had recently completed job searches read multiple recruiting messages and ranked the importance of different elements in the messages.

Findings

General linear modeling found statistical differences between the importance of recruiting message elements for participants with varying levels of HWP and OWP.

Research limitations/implications

The participants were information technology, engineering and human resource professionals limiting the generalizability of these results to other professions.

Practical implications

Recruiters should vary the information in their recruiting messages depending on the levels of HWP and OWP they want to attract to their applicant pools.

Originality/value

This research adds harmonious and obsessive work passion to the constructs considered in the recruiting message development process.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2004

Ralph Biddington

There have been a number of studies of church‐state relations and the place of religion in education in nineteenth and early twentieth century Victoria. However, these…

Abstract

There have been a number of studies of church‐state relations and the place of religion in education in nineteenth and early twentieth century Victoria. However, these studies, including J. S. Gregory’s authoritative Church and State, offer no significant discussion of Rationalism. This is somewhat surprising, since Gregory’s influential earlier discussion of church, state and education up to 1872 had included a few paragraphs on Rationalism. It is even more surprising that it was overlooked in Gregory’s later and larger study, which extends to the early twentieth century, since Rationalism was by then a much more powerful force. A consequence of this omission, together with the general shift of scholarly interest away from the church‐state issue, is that little is known about Rationalism and its approach to church‐state relations in the period when, arguably, it was a force to be reckoned with. This article helps correct this omission, first, by examining the development of Rationalism in Victoria up to the early 1900s, and second, by exploring its successful campaign against the Protestant attempt to install a divinity degree at the University of Melbourne.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Afonso Fleury, Mike Gregory and David Bennett

Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Peter Kellett, David M. Gregory and Joan Evans

In this paper, the authors situate existing scholarship about men in nursing within the broader gendered landscape of the profession and society. As a consequence, the…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors situate existing scholarship about men in nursing within the broader gendered landscape of the profession and society. As a consequence, the need to reframe the discourse about men in nursing from the current emphasis on personal or collective experiences to collective action becomes apparent. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical synthesis of scholarship addressing men in nursing serves as the basis for a conceptual paper which challenges the existing discourse on men in nursing.

Findings

The experiences and careers of men in nursing are profoundly shaped by patriarchal power structures that situate caregiving within the realm of the feminine. Although men generally benefit in the context of patriarchal society, men in nursing are subject to a patriarchal paradox that marginalizes their performance of masculinity and situates them as unlikely caregivers. Therefore, men in nursing are preoccupied with balancing the contradictions and tensions in their lives associated with enacting a contextual performance of masculinity depending on the social context of their gender performance.

Originality/value

A comprehensive synthesis of the existing men in nursing literature is presented and these findings are situated within a broader discussion of gender in nursing and society. This analysis provides the impetus for a “call to action” for nursing to comprehensively and meaningfully address the negative consequences of patriarchal forces on the profession of nursing.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

Jacqueline J. Brown, C. David Light and Gregory M. Gazda

The differences and similarities in US consumers' perceptions of cars produced in six countries was highlighted, helping to determine product differentiation and define…

Abstract

The differences and similarities in US consumers' perceptions of cars produced in six countries was highlighted, helping to determine product differentiation and define the proper competitive position for a product. It looks closely at country‐of‐origin bases, and whether to fight them, compensate for them or capitalise on them. The European car image is found to be a positive one in the US, and could become the basis for a distinct positive advantage.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

David S. Jenkins, Gregory D. Kane and Uma Velury

We investigate the relative roles of key components of earnings change in explaining the value relevance of earnings across different life‐cycle stages of the firm. We…

Abstract

We investigate the relative roles of key components of earnings change in explaining the value relevance of earnings across different life‐cycle stages of the firm. We hypothesize that firms in different life‐cycle stages take different strategic actions: change in sales is emphasized in the growth and mature stages, while in later stages, profitability is emphasized. Because payoffs to such strategies vary across the life‐cycle, the stock market reaction to the success firms have in employing these strategic actions is likely to vary across the life‐cycle. To test our hypotheses, we disaggregate changes in earnings into three key components: earnings change from change in sales, earnings change from change in profitability, and an interaction term comprising both sales change and profitability change. Our findings are consistent with our hypotheses: when firms are in the growth stage, the value‐relevance of change in sales is relatively greater than that of change in profitability. In the mature stage, the value relevance of change in profitability increases, relative to that of change in sales. When firms are in stagnant stage, the value‐relevance of changes in profitability are relatively greater than that of change in sales. Collectively, the results demonstrate a shift in the value relevance of earnings components from a growth emphasis early in the life‐cycle to a profitability emphasis later in the life‐cycle.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Kirit Vaidya, David Bennett and Xiaming Liu

The paper assesses the extent to which China's comparative advantage in manufacturing has shifted towards higher‐tech sectors between 1987 and 2005 and proposes possible…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper assesses the extent to which China's comparative advantage in manufacturing has shifted towards higher‐tech sectors between 1987 and 2005 and proposes possible explanations for the shift.

Design/methodology/approach

Revealed comparative advantage (RCA) indices for 27 product groups, representing high‐, medium and low‐tech sectors have been calculated. Examination of international market attractiveness complements the RCA analysis. Findings for selected sectors are evaluated in the context of other evidence.

Findings

While China maintains its competitiveness in low‐tech labour intensive products, it has gained RCA in selected medium‐tech sectors (e.g. office machines and electric machinery) and the high‐tech telecommunications and automatic data processing equipment sectors. Evidence from firm and sector specific studies suggests that improved comparative advantage in medium and high‐tech sectors is based on capabilities developing through combining international technology transfer and learning.

Research limitations/implications

The quantitative analysis does not explain the shifts in comparative advantage, though the paper suggests possible explanations. Further research at firm and sector levels is required to understand the underlying capability development of Chinese enterprises and the relative competitiveness of Chinese and foreign invested enterprises.

Practical implications

Western companies should take account of capability development in China in forming their international manufacturing strategies. The rapid shifts in China's comparative advantage have lessons for other industrialising countries.

Originality/value

While RCA is a well‐known methodology, its application at the disaggregated product group level combined with market attractiveness assessment is distinctive. The paper provides a broad assessment of changes in Chinese manufacturing as a basis for further research on capability development at firm and sector levels.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Christer Karlsson and Martin Sköld

Traditional perspectives of manufacturing strategy tend to focus internal transforming activities, including how transformed resources are handled and the relations with…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional perspectives of manufacturing strategy tend to focus internal transforming activities, including how transformed resources are handled and the relations with other value‐creating operations inside and outside the firm. Manufacturing management evolved as a discipline with little clear alignments with business strategy and firm positioning. Even manufacturing strategy is often delimited to the boundaries of the firm and its dyad relations to collaborating actors such as suppliers and distributors. This paper aims at exploring and demonstrating what a network perspective can add to the understanding of manufacturing management and strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design is built on principal reasoning of future manufacturing strategy. Articles and conference papers together with over 25 years of field studies constitute the empirical base. An industry was chosen to demonstrate the application of the research framework of horizontal and vertical technologies.

Findings

The analysis indicates that manufacturing occurs within open‐production systems here called extraprises as an extension to enterprises with their inside the firm focus. Taking a network perspective, it is suggested that a conceptual framework of horizontal and vertical technologies offers a fruitful conceptualization to identify the content and meaning of future manufacturing strategy.

Research implications/implications

The network theory conceptualization takes the view of manufacturing systems a further step beyond systems theory and contributes a richer framework for manufacturing strategy research.

Originality/value

It is argued that future directions of manufacturing strategy will gain from taking a network perspective using network theory with its foundations in actors, resources, and activities.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1971

Hugh K. Mackay

THAT DR T. C. SMOUT in his highly praised A History of the Scottish People, 1560–1830 (1969) felt able to dismiss Robert Fergusson (‘the dissipated son of an Edinburgh…

Abstract

THAT DR T. C. SMOUT in his highly praised A History of the Scottish People, 1560–1830 (1969) felt able to dismiss Robert Fergusson (‘the dissipated son of an Edinburgh clerk’) with the verdict ‘nothing more serious than the celebration of food and drink was ever his business’ indicates yet again the continuing depreciation that, with honourable exceptions, has been Fergusson's critical fate since his bourgeoning fame disappeared in the furore excited by the appearance of Burns.

Details

Library Review, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

August Mohr

David Huffman, as a graduate student, earned his immortality by solving a problem that had stumped Claude Shannon, the creator of the field of information theory. How he…

Abstract

Purpose

David Huffman, as a graduate student, earned his immortality by solving a problem that had stumped Claude Shannon, the creator of the field of information theory. How he saw the problem differently and the nature of his discovery have implications for how we get stuck, how we get unstuck, and how the internal models limit the ability to see patterns in the world. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes how Huffman discovered his elegant algorithm, why it had not been discovered previously, how the algorithm may relate to the attempt to find meaning in decision making, and generalises implications for problem solving and daily lives.

Findings

Huffman was only able to see the problem anew in the cathartic moment of abandoning it. The algorithm he discovered suggests that the concept of “meaning” was an obstacle in his process.

Practical implications

Huffman coding is one of the underpinnings of computer science. While it should be widely understood for that alone, the process of its discovery and its fundamental methodology are deeply instructional.

Originality/value

Alexander Pope said “As the twig is bent, so grows the tree”, a classic statement about conscious purpose and man's controlling nature. Huffman's algorithm suggests the real world works the other way around: “As the leaves are lit, so grows the tree”.

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