Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 September 2018

Terry David Gibson and Nigel Scott

The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed account of the “Views from the Frontline” and “Frontline” methodologies, which underpinned the case studies presented in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed account of the “Views from the Frontline” and “Frontline” methodologies, which underpinned the case studies presented in this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A participant observer account of the development of the methods, leading to a critical discussion of their deployment and impact and a concluding discussion of further work required.

Findings

The study found that iterative development of the programmes had improved their ability to gather and analyse local experience, knowledge and priorities concerning risk and resilience, but raised a concern over the means by which this information was able to achieve necessary political influence.

Originality/value

This technical paper is a first assessment of the underlying method and application of “Views from the Frontline” and “Frontline” and benefits from the participant observer status of the authors. More work is required on the underlying questions concerning qualitative vs quantitatitive methods, and on the means of achieving political impact from the work.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Terry David Gibson, Festus Tongwa Aka, Ruiti Aretaake, Sarwar Bari, Guillaume Chantry, Manu Gupta, Jesusa Grace Molina, John Norton, Bhubaneswari Parajuli, Hepi Rahmawati and Nisha Shresha

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the findings from the body of case studies offered in the issue, combined with three external perspectives on local voices and action.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the findings from the body of case studies offered in the issue, combined with three external perspectives on local voices and action.

Design/methodology/approach

Using as its basis the eight key case studies and three external contributions to the special issue, the paper offers a theoretical framework as a basis for discussion of this material. Through this, it identifies possible modes of action understood through the theoretical framework and elaborated through the specific cases. It concludes with proposals for further work.

Findings

The discussion finds that from a local perspective, the ambitions of local populations and local NGOs to achieve emancipatory change depend on the scope for local collaboration and partnerships to exercise influence on underlying risk factors. It resolves the suggested tension between operating within, and outside the system through the concept of “legitimate subversion”.

Originality/value

It is felt that the original recording of case studies of local level action combined with the process of iterative critical reflection on the part of the contributors offers a novel approach to knowledge creation from practice, and offers insights bridging theoretical and practitioner perspectives into means of addressing underlying risk factors affecting local populations.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2018

John Norton and Terry David Gibson

The purpose of this paper is to outline the iterative process which led to the production of the case studies prepared by Civil Society Organisations which are at the core…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the iterative process which led to the production of the case studies prepared by Civil Society Organisations which are at the core of this Special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The development of the papers has been a process of “case study authors” peer group (editors included) exchange and discussed development, in a reactive or “stepwise” process encouraging authors to develop their material to reflect very varied contexts and cases related to community-driven actions and vulnerabilities.

Findings

The collaborative process has enabled authors to develop and share both the breadth and depth of complex local issues that address emerging vulnerabilities and barriers to community-driven action.

Originality/value

Encouraging local authors to critically explore their local experience and action has deepened our understanding of how communities actually assess and address their local reality and the challenges they face, whether these are locally considered as “disasters” or not, or indeed seen as long-term evolving risks and threats to survival.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

David Gibson and Vasilios Tavlaridis

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of using work-based learning (WBL) pedagogy within the curriculum to embed enterprise skills within the Liverpool John…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of using work-based learning (WBL) pedagogy within the curriculum to embed enterprise skills within the Liverpool John Moores University and review the potential relevance of WBL pedagogy to create impactful learning experiences within the curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used quantitative methodology for this study using a pre- and post-program questionnaire (E-factor) to measure their entrepreneurial competencies. Data were collected from over 500 students over a two-year period.

Findings

The study indicates that WBL can provided transformational learning experiences for students of all disciplines as 85 percent of the students enhanced their entrepreneurial competencies and mindsets.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides significant evidence of the impact WBL pedagogy had on students over a two-year period at the Liverpool John Moores University. However, the data were collected from the student population of a single higher education institution and longitudinal evidence is needed to evaluate the long-term benefits of completing a comparative study with another university.

Practical implications

The WBL pedagogical approach can be applied to all subject areas to allow enterprise education to be embedded throughout the university curriculum. The research also shows that “live” civic engagement projects provides excellent examples of experiential learning and reflection in the assessment process.

Originality/value

The approach is relevant to all universities seeking to embed enterprise within all curriculums in line with the QAA draft guidelines (2012). The student experience should also be significantly enhanced through the provision of transformational learning experience for all students. It provides a clear methodology that can be customized for application to curricular enterprise education in all subject areas in all universities in the UK and indeed internationally.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 September 2018

Terry David Gibson, Aka Festus Tongwa, Sarwar Bari, Guillaume Chantry, Manu Gupta, Jesusa Grace Molina, Nisha Shresha, John Norton, Bhubaneswari Parajuli, Hepi Rahmawati and Ruiti Aretaake

The purpose of this paper is to individually examine the findings from eight case studies presented in this special issue and comparatively identify the findings regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to individually examine the findings from eight case studies presented in this special issue and comparatively identify the findings regarding local learning and action.

Design/methodology/approach

Underlying research questions regarding power and powerlessness in regard to addressing underlying risk factors affecting local populations form the basis for the discussion. Proceedings of a collaborative workshop conducted with the contributing authors are analysed qualitatively to identify learning relating to the research questions emerging from the case studies individually and collectively.

Findings

A number of strategies and tactics for addressing underlying risk factors affecting local populations were identified from the case studies, including collaboration and cohesion. Campaigning, lobbying, communications and social mobilisation in an attempt to bridge the gap between local concerns and the decision-making of government and other powerful actors. Innovation and local mobilisation to address shortcomings in government support for disaster reduction and development. Communications as a first base to influence behaviour of both communities and government. Social change through empowerment of women to act in disaster reduction and development.

Research limitations/implications

The outcomes of the action research conducted by the authors individually and collectively highlight the necessity for bridging different scales of action through a range of strategies and tactics to move beyond local self-reliance to influence on underlying risk factors. The action research process employed may have wider applications in gathering and formalising local-level experience and knowledge.

Practical implications

The case studies and their analysis present a range of practical strategies and tactics to strengthen local resilience and address underlying risk factors which are replicable in other contexts.

Originality/value

Practitioners are activists and do not often engage in critical reflection and analysis. The method presented here offers a means of achieving this in order to generate learning from local-level experience. The findings contribute to the consideration of cross-scale action to address underlying risk factors which impact local communities.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Edyta Rudawska and Sanda Renko

The contemporary business world has been facing mounting criticism for quite a long time. The accusations relate to the short-sightedness of business decisions, strategies…

Abstract

The contemporary business world has been facing mounting criticism for quite a long time. The accusations relate to the short-sightedness of business decisions, strategies oriented solely to profit-making, hostile takeovers, a focus on cost reduction, employee redundancies, etc. This has led to a decline in trust towards business executives, as shown, for example, by the 2016 GfK Trust Index based on research conducted in 27 countries, including 13 European ones. According to the survey, managers and entrepreneurs are ranked 22nd out of 32 professions analysed (Trust in Professions, 2016). This relatively low level of trust in business managers, coupled with the new challenges created by a changing business environment which managers must cope with in order to stay in the market, means that contemporary companies have to change. Corporations are increasingly being challenged as to their function in society. Entrepreneurs must face the challenges connected not only with increasing competition or the development of new technologies, but also growing social expectations. This means that companies today must be managed not only effectively, but also responsibly. This chapter will present the findings of research on the place of sustainability marketing activities in the system of goals for contemporary organizations. To begin with, market trends will be discussed, which in today’s world to the greatest extent influence the marketing strategies of small and medium-sized enterprises in the food and drink sector, as well as the challenges such companies face nowadays. Next, a change in the significance of the strategic goals that these companies set for themselves will be discussed. The final part of the chapter will focus on sustainability aspects in the strategies adopted by SMEs.

Details

The Sustainable Marketing Concept in European SMEs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-039-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2012

David Gibson

If there are truly impermeable walls between objective research purity, applied science research and development, and advocacy for social justice, then the current system…

Abstract

If there are truly impermeable walls between objective research purity, applied science research and development, and advocacy for social justice, then the current system of education, tenure, rewards and recognition should be serving society well now and into the future. However, the world has dramatically changed due to three shaping forces in society: (1) technological flattening of the landscape of opportunity, (2) the rise of the inseparable role of technology in creating knowledge and culture, and (3) the development of complex systems science. These three game changers imply a dramatic rethinking of the foundations of knowledge and practice in all fields because they exert new constraints and open up new opportunities for education concerning the knowledge and skills needed to prepare the next generation of leaders for the global competition of ideas, creativity, and human potential. The 21st century educator capable of transforming learning environments is a person who is a master of these three core concepts. This chapter articulates a vision that is aimed to generate thinking and debate, and like an attractor, pull mental models toward the future as scholarly communities in education grapple with their own next steps and the challenging conversations needed for advancement and innovation in response to the globally changing landscape.

Details

Transforming Learning Environments: Strategies to Shape the Next Generation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-015-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

1 – 10 of over 1000