Search results

1 – 10 of 62
Article
Publication date: 5 April 2022

Mohammad Alghababsheh and David Gallear

The concept of sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) integrates the environmental and social sustainability dimensions into the management of supply chains. However, the…

2934

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) integrates the environmental and social sustainability dimensions into the management of supply chains. However, the understanding of the management of social sustainability in the supply chain is relatively underdeveloped. This paper, therefore, seeks to explore the adoption, emerging approaches and the (un)intended outcomes of social sustainability in the supply chain as well as supply chain social sustainability in the Arab world.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper systematically reviews 396 peer-reviewed papers on social sustainability in the supply chain published between 1997 and 2020.

Findings

The review identifies and discusses three types of factors influencing the adoption of social sustainability in the supply chain: drivers, enablers and barriers. The review also identifies four main approaches to tackling social issues in the supply chain, namely an internal approach (e.g. internal adaptation), a hands-off approach (e.g. supplier switching), a hands-on approach (e.g. collaboration practices) and a relational approach (e.g. justice). The review also reveals that although addressing these issues can generate positive outcomes, it can also lead to unintended negative outcomes such as increased social violations and the perception of unfairness among suppliers.

Originality/value

This study complements the existing literature reviews on the social dimension of SSCM by not only providing an update of the current literature and shedding light on an emerging approaches (e.g. justice) to tackling social issues in supply chains but also by exposing the unintended negative consequences of tackling social issues, a subject that has largely been overlooked to date.

Details

Management & Sustainability: An Arab Review, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2752-9819

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Nesrine Eltawy and David Gallear

The purpose of this paper is to compare and distinguish between two salient means for improving the management of, and leveraging the effectiveness of, supply chains. Leanness and…

1606

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare and distinguish between two salient means for improving the management of, and leveraging the effectiveness of, supply chains. Leanness and agility have been considered recently as prominent and successful means for competing. The paper examines the literature on leanness and agility thinking including their definitions, importance and practices. The paper also highlights the argument surrounding the relationship direction between these two concepts.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic comparative review was conducted on the lean literature and agility literature at three levels: manufacturing, organisation and supply chain. The systematic review on the lean concept has been conducted based on articles published over the last two decades. The agility concept review was conducted based on the articles published from its inception in 1991 through early 2016.

Findings

A conceptual framework is presented following the in-depth review. The conceptual framework sets out the input, operational practice and output elements necessary for both philosophies to take root successfully. A discussion based on the review of the literature on the direction of the relationship between leanness and agility is also presented, and should also be included in any future empirical testing of the conceptual framework.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based on a systematic review which extends previous research as it has been conducted in a detailed and clear systematic manner which enables a deep understanding of the similarities and differences between leanness and agility philosophies from an operational perspective: inputs, operational and outcomes elements. Future research is required to empirically test the conceptual relationships.

Practical implications

Companies are constantly searching for ways to improve their supply chains. This paper seeks to provide a deep understanding for lean and agility philosophies as important means for achieving this goal. This has been conducted by clarifying the differences, similarities and the direction of the relationship that may exist between these two approaches as means for improving a company’s supply chain.

Originality/value

Based on a systematic review on leanness and agility philosophies, a conceptual framework exploring the differences and similarities between both philosophies from an operational systematic perspective is presented.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 117 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2018

Ahlam Hassan, David Gallear and Uthayasankar Sivarajah

While the importance of leadership in various domains has been highlighted in the extant literature, effective leadership in the context of higher education sector has not been…

2192

Abstract

Purpose

While the importance of leadership in various domains has been highlighted in the extant literature, effective leadership in the context of higher education sector has not been well addressed in the leadership scholarship. There is a need to address the challenge of leadership effectiveness in the education sector, including business schools, given the failures noticed in the sector attributed to poor-quality leadership. The purpose of this study was therefore to explore the factors that affected leadership in the context of higher education institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is exploratory in nature as the study critically reviewed extant literature surrounding leadership practices specifically from a public-sector context to identify factors affecting leadership effectiveness.

Findings

The findings of the study pointed out that, regardless of the nation or organisation, leadership effectiveness is a factor that is dependent on how well the followers have accepted the leader. This indicates that, amongst the different challenges explored in this study, leadership effectiveness is not only a challenge by itself but is also affected by other challenges, including leadership practice and style.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides a better understanding of the critical factors affecting leadership practice of deans of business schools and how the styles’ influence on leadership practice, the relationship between leadership practice and leadership effectiveness and how leadership style translates into leadership effectiveness.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the growing body of knowledge surrounding leadership scholarship from a public-sector context about the challenges that affect leadership effectiveness in the context of HEIs and stimulates further investigation into those challenges.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Abby Ghobadian, David Gallear and Michael Hopkins

The purpose of this paper is to explore the similarities and differences between Total Quality Management (TQM) and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Moreover, the paper…

3653

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the similarities and differences between Total Quality Management (TQM) and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Moreover, the paper considers the implications of these similarities and differences for the future development of TQM and CSR.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a structured discourse analysis which is used to systematically explore these two discursive subjects. Both concepts encompass discursive ideas and practices.

Findings

The findings in the paper suggest that the two concepts share similar philosophical roots, that there is a substantial overlap between the elements of the two concepts, and that the ultimate expected outcome shows significant similarities. Despite these similarities, however, implementation of TQM will not necessarily result in CSR.

Research limitations/implications

In this paper the findings lead to the conclusion that it is important to recognise the specific needs of CSR and include them as an implicit part of TQM. This conclusion has an important practical and descriptive theoretical implication and the extent to which CSR is diffused as a part of TQM depends on it.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the need for the development of a descriptive theory, that is to say, the identification of the mechanism(s) through which elements of CSR could be developed and implemented alongside that of TQM.

Originality/value

The paper sees that the question of the intersection between CSR and TQM has attracted the interest of other researchers. The majority of the previous work is normative. The contribution to this developing literature is made by adopting a systematic discursive approach using philosophy, elements of TQM/CSR process and outcomes as the framework for the analysis.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Abby Ghobadian, Nicholas O'Regan, Howard Thomas and David Gallear

4746

Abstract

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

David Gallear, Abby Ghobadian and Nicholas O'Regan

To date little is known about the actual level of utilisation of digital/web‐based interaction technologies in purchasing and supply management (SM) in the UK. This paper seeks to…

1955

Abstract

Purpose

To date little is known about the actual level of utilisation of digital/web‐based interaction technologies in purchasing and supply management (SM) in the UK. This paper seeks to address this gap in the extant knowledge through empirical research in a UK setting. It examines the level of usage, the uses, the perceived benefits, and future perspective on the use, of web‐based technology in purchasing and SM.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical survey of UK‐based organisations was undertaken. Information simultaneously collected on the buyer‐supplier relationship orientation of the firms in the sample was used to test the proposition that the use of web‐based technology leads to stronger collaborative relationships with suppliers.

Findings

Data obtained from 156 valid responses indicated that six in every ten organisations use web‐based technology to support purchasing and SM activities, but that the usage is lower in small to medium‐sized enterprises. The main uses reported are for communicating with suppliers, for marketing products/services, and for locating technical data. Making purchases over the internet was significantly more prevalent in organisations exhibiting relatively more partnership orientation.

Practical implications

The findings provide only limited evidence in support of the proposition that the deployment of web‐based technology leads to stronger buyer‐supplier relations. However, findings do suggest that the effectiveness of the purchasing and supply function can be enhanced through greater use of web‐based technology for online purchasing and for efficient consumer response.

Originality/value

The paper establishes salient UK managerial perception on the strategic and operational importance of web‐based technology adoption in purchasing and SM.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Urban Ljungquist

The purpose of this paper is to outline a model that is conceptually and empirically applicable by practitioners in contexts extending beyond mere core competence identification.

8345

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline a model that is conceptually and empirically applicable by practitioners in contexts extending beyond mere core competence identification.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a conceptual review of a model.

Findings

This paper demonstrates that the associated concepts (competence, capability, and resources) have characteristics that differ both conceptually and empirically. The findings also indicate that competencies are central to core competence matters; it is possible to distinguish them analytically by three criteria. Furthermore, the notions of hierarchy suggested in previous research could not be verified which implies that the associated concepts all reside at the same hierarchy level.

Research limitations/implications

The findings advance core competence theories that better serve the needs of practicing managers and consultants, by initiating a specific research agenda in conceptual and empirical reviews and discussions. By proposing a model, the study provides a point of departure for core competency research that goes beyond matters of identification.

Practical implications

The dissimilar characteristics of the associated concepts offer great opportunities to core competency management, by means of the different influences they have on core competencies. Their influence makes organizational change and rejuvenation not only comprehensible, but also manageable. This is of particular importance to organizations that need ongoing renewal of core competencies, for example, when facing dynamic business environments. Competence improvements manage and change core competencies; capability supports reinforce and create structure before, during, and after a change process; resource utilizations are operative, and need daily attention.

Originality/value

The paper initiates a new research agenda for core competency matters by acknowledging specific features of the concepts associated with core competence. This makes a significant contribution to the existing literature in terms of practical and scholarly applicability.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Abby Ghobadian and David Gallear

Notes a broad agreement that small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) fulfil a critical role in modern economies, and therefore their ability to survive, remain competitive and…

8656

Abstract

Notes a broad agreement that small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) fulfil a critical role in modern economies, and therefore their ability to survive, remain competitive and produce high quality outputs is of utmost importance at both micro and macro levels. Focuses on total quality management (TQM), a new management paradigm, which is successfully competing with the well‐established paradigms such as scientific management. Argues that implementation of TQM principles can potentially help SMEs to enhance their robustness, as well as improve the quality of their final output. However, observes that, by comparison with the large organizations, SMEs have been slow in implementing TQM. Examines the differences between the characteristics of SMEs and large organizations; the relationship between the size of organization and inherent characteristics of TQM; and the effect of organization size on the implementation of TQM using deductive research. Using the case data, develops a ten‐step methodology for the implementation of TQM in SMEs.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Ulrich Lichtenthaler

Besides applying knowledge in own products and services, firms increasingly exploit their knowledge assets externally, e.g. by means of licensing out technology. The aim of this…

2832

Abstract

Purpose

Besides applying knowledge in own products and services, firms increasingly exploit their knowledge assets externally, e.g. by means of licensing out technology. The aim of this paper is to help firms achieve strategic fit in the keep‐or‐sell issue, which results from potential external knowledge exploitation.

Design/methodology/approach

The keep‐or‐sell decision refers to the issue whether to commercialize knowledge assets externally in addition to exploiting them inside the organization. Because of the high opportunities and risks of externally leveraging knowledge, the keep‐or‐sell decision constitutes a major area of conflict between strategies at different levels, particularly knowledge vs product strategies, corporate vs business unit strategies and R&D vs marketing strategies. After detailing the keep‐or‐sell decision, the paper conceptually explores how firms may respond to potential conflicts in the keep‐or‐sell decision by achieving strategic fit.

Findings

The paper identifies, in particular, three major characteristics of a firm's strategic approach, i.e. coordination, centralization, and collaboration, which may help firms achieve strategic fit in the keep‐or‐sell issue.

Originality/value

The keep‐or‐sell decision is a unique arena for studying hierarchical strategies and strategic fit. As a result, this paper has major implications for research into strategic fit, hierarchical strategies, knowledge management and open innovation. Achieving fit across a firm's different strategies in the keep‐or‐sell issue is essential for firm performance in a knowledge‐based economy.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Barry J. Witcher and Vinh Sum Chau

The paper seeks to combine the uses of the balanced scorecard and hoshin kanri as integrative dynamic capabilities for the entire strategic management process. It aims to posit a…

9476

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to combine the uses of the balanced scorecard and hoshin kanri as integrative dynamic capabilities for the entire strategic management process. It aims to posit a model for the combination of these long‐ and short‐term organisational activities as a framework for a senior level to manage a firm's strategic fit as an integrated organisation‐wide system that links top management goals to daily management.

Design/methodology/approach

The resource‐based view of strategy is explored for its relevance to how a combined balanced scorecard and hoshin kanri approach serves as a high‐order dynamic capability. Examples are given from Canon, Toyota and Nissan, of how core capabilities are managed to show how strategy is executed cross‐functionally across a firm's functional hierarchy.

Findings

The study finds that strategic management of the organisation should consider the long‐term strategy as well as the short‐term capability. Important to this are core capabilities and core competences, cross‐functional management, and top executive audits, which, when managed properly, explicate a new view of strategic fit, as a form of nested hierarchies of dynamic capabilities.

Originality/value

The paper is the first exposition of how balanced scorecard and hoshin kanri practices may usefully complement each other in strategic management. It is a useful framework for dynamically managing sustained competitive advantage.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

1 – 10 of 62