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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Yvonne McNulty and Helen De Cieri

Little is known about the attraction, development, and attrition factors that impact on expatriates’ decision making in relation to international assignment opportunities…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about the attraction, development, and attrition factors that impact on expatriates’ decision making in relation to international assignment opportunities, nor is there clear understanding as to how global mobility outcomes impact on global talent management (GTM). The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the attraction, development, and attrition of expatriates as a process that is focussed on two core elements of expatriate ROI (eROI) – corporate ROI (cROI) and individual ROI (iROI). Further, the authors adopt an innovative approach by conceptualizing how global mobility is linked to GTM.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying psychological contract theory, the authors draw on empirical data from two large studies to compare the perspectives of mobility managers (the cROI inputs) with those of long-term assignees (expatriates; the iROI inputs) to identify how global mobility outcomes can impact on GTM.

Findings

By comparing and contrasting corporate and individual perspectives, the findings show a more complete picture of expatriation in practice than has been offered in prior research. Doing so highlights synergies and conflicts in the desired support provided for, and outcomes expected from, global mobility and GTM programs.

Originality/value

The research adds to the literature by demonstrating how cROI and iROI combine to influence overall global mobility outcomes for multinational corporations, and how these, in turn, impact on GTM initiatives and overall GTM success. It extends previous research to specifically link global mobility to GTM, and adds to the limited empirical literature on eROI. The research also advances understanding of the employment relationship during expatriation by identifying new factors and consequences pertaining to psychological contract fulfillment. Implications for future research are presented.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Hugh Scullion, Vlad Vaiman and David G. Collings

Abstract

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Eva Gallardo-Gallardo and Marian Thunnissen

The purpose of this paper is to frame empirical literature on talent management (TM), and to provide a clear and comprehensive picture of the topics under investigation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to frame empirical literature on talent management (TM), and to provide a clear and comprehensive picture of the topics under investigation, the conceptualization of TM, and under-explored areas.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted a systematic review that covers empirical research on TM which has been published between 2006 and 2014 in academic peer-reviewed journals. A total of 96 articles were included in the review. A bibliometric as well as a content analysis has been carried out.

Findings

The results reveal that the Anglo-Saxon context (in particular EU) has a great impact on empirical TM research. Also research foundations and designs are not very rigorous. A slight awareness of context and culture was found. Empirical TM research is predominantly built on an exclusive approach to TM. Yet, how TM works in practice and how well (from the perspective of multiple actors) as well as the role and perceptions of line managers are under-explored areas.

Practical implications

The paper gives vision and direction to practitioners in particular on the definition of talent and TM.

Originality/value

This study frames the extent and nature of empirical research on TM, and it is the first to specifically and objectively examine the advances made in the field and to identify under-explored areas. By doing so, it helps to avoid presumptions and misguided beliefs, to advance the knowledge of TM issues in organizations and regions, and to better channel future research.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Vlad Vaiman, David G. Collings and Hugh Scullion

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Karin A. King

An organisation’s management of talent is central to its opportunity to benefit from human capital (HC). Closer examination of the impact of strategic talent management…

Abstract

Purpose

An organisation’s management of talent is central to its opportunity to benefit from human capital (HC). Closer examination of the impact of strategic talent management (STM) on the psychological contract (PC) and employee organisation relationship of talented employees is imperative if STM is to achieve intended organisational performance outcomes. Conceptualising the talented-employee perception of exchange as the “talent deal” and experience of STM over time as the “talent journey”, an empirical research model is introduced. The paper aims to discuss these issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The model examines employee perceptions of STM, locating the employee response to STM within the wider SHRM-performance linkage.

Findings

The research model theorises the PC of talented employees is modified by talent identification and STM is experienced through a series of significant career events.

Research limitations/implications

Further developing theory within the emerging field of STM, the paper extends STM, SHRM and organisational behaviour literatures by considering the employee’s psychological response to STM. Empirical study considerations are presented.

Practical implications

The “talent deal” and “talent journey” illustrate the employee experience of STM, drawing management attention to the consequences of talent identification including potential risk of altered expectations.

Originality/value

Considering the employee centrally in STM, the model theorises the impact of STM on the talented employee’s PC and their relationship. Introducing the talent deal and talent journey provides a lens to examine the attitudes of talented employees relative to the broader workforce. The model frames future multi-level research of the association between the “Talent Deal” and performance outcomes.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Marian Thunnissen

The purpose of this paper is to identify and explain what happens in practice in TM, in order to contribute to the building of a broader and more balanced theoretical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and explain what happens in practice in TM, in order to contribute to the building of a broader and more balanced theoretical framework for TM in which the impact of the organizational context and its interrelated actors are taken into account.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data were collected in an explorative, longitudinal study on TM policies and practices in five Dutch university departments.

Findings

The two crucial actors in TM – the organization and the talented employee – have a different perception of the intended and actual value of TM. The organization is capable of shaping and implementing a TM system that meets its needs, so from an organizational perspective TM is effective. Since the needs of the talented employees are insufficiently addressed in the intended and actual TM practices, TM has less value for them. Various influence factors at the institutional, organizational and individual level are identified.

Research limitations/implications

The study was a first step in opening the “black box” in TM, but several questions on the TM process still remain unanswered. The author therefore encourages more research on the multiple levels in the TM process, and the factors that cause variability.

Practical implications

Knowledge of the factors which influence the TM process from strategy to outcomes can help practitioners to build a more effective TM approach.

Originality/value

Theoretical approaches from companion academic disciplines are linked to the dominant viewpoints in the TM literature. Moreover, to give counterbalance to the tendency to use universal models to explain TM, this study contextualizes TM. Finally, this study goes beyond a focus on management interests, and investigates to what extent other stakeholders (employees) benefit from TM.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Nicole Böhmer and Heike Schinnenburg

The purpose of this paper is to further develop Global Talent Management (GTM) and the career literature by conceptualizing a model that uses widely discussed contemporary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to further develop Global Talent Management (GTM) and the career literature by conceptualizing a model that uses widely discussed contemporary career concepts such as boundaryless career, protean career and kaleidoscope career, with a special focus on gender issues and contextual impact factors. This model contributes to the understanding of how GTM in multinational enterprises (MNEs) can be designed to fit lifelong career courses and to reduce talent scarcity by increasing the deployment of female talent.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a theoretical model of a talent’s lifelong development of career orientations, and draw insights from many discreet literature bases. Through a review of the relevant literature, this paper synthesizes a holistic approach to understand why MNEs need a tailor-made GTM with a particular focus on gender and a life phase-specific career orientation with strong local responsiveness.

Findings

The Dynamic Career Cube is a hermeneutic model that helps to visualize the individual career course of talented employees and the fit of talent’s career orientations and GTM.

Research limitations/implications

A research agenda that includes a retrospective analysis of biographies, especially considering contextual factors such as culture and role stereotypes, is proposed as a starting point for research in this field.

Practical implications

The design and implementation of current GTM must be questioned to fit the contextual factors and to currently match the needs of talented male and female employees throughout their lifelong career course. Tailor-made GTM measures depending on the career phase are proposed.

Originality/value

The paper provides a novel synthesis of the existing research and literature on GTM, gender and careers. By showing the complexity of individual career decisions that are influenced by internal and contextual factors, the paper emphasizes the importance of flexible, locally responsive and gender-inclusive GTM. The paper is useful for academics who seek insight into a talent’s decision-making process and practitioners who manage talent globally.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

Eoin Whelan, David G. Collings and Brian Donnellan

This paper seeks to explore the processes and channels through which valuable knowledge from outside the firm reaches those employees who can exploit that knowledge for

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore the processes and channels through which valuable knowledge from outside the firm reaches those employees who can exploit that knowledge for innovative purposes. It seeks to identify the specific talents exhibited by the key individuals involved in facilitating these important knowledge flows. It also aims to detail the interventions which management can adopt to harness knowledge flow talents.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used was a single case study of a medical devices R&D group, incorporating social network analysis and semi‐structured interviews.

Findings

It was found that it is now rare for a single individual to possess all the talents necessary to effectively acquire and disseminate external knowledge. Owing to the prevalence of information and communication technologies, a small number of uniquely skilled individuals specialize in acquiring valuable external knowledge, while an altogether different set of individuals specialize in disseminating that knowledge internally.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of literature in the knowledge management field directed towards understanding how the unique talents of those employees who are integral components of knowledge networks can be harnessed. Building on concepts of talent management and the technological gatekeeper, the specific talents exhibited by these individuals are explored. Then some organizational level interventions are pointed up, which can facilitate knowledge‐intensive organizations in fully exploiting their resources to maximize innovative capabilities.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Annette Begley, David G. Collings and Hugh Scullion

The purpose of this paper is to examine the self‐initiated repatriation experience of native professionals as they return to the labour market in the Republic of Ireland…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the self‐initiated repatriation experience of native professionals as they return to the labour market in the Republic of Ireland of their own volition and without the support of an employer.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methodology was employed to gather the data. In total, 40 responses were received from an initial open solicitation calling for research participants. Following a short survey receiving 34 responses, individuals who had returned without the aid of an employer to the Republic of Ireland and were willing to participate in further research were invited to participate in either a focus group discussion or in‐depth individual interviews. Ultimately, there were seven participants in the focus group and eleven individual in‐depth interviews.

Findings

The study found that the experiences of those in this study returning of their own volition and those of the more traditional repatriate do not seem to differ significantly across the facets of adjustment relating to adjustment in the general home country environment and adjustment to home country nationals, although subtle variations may be found. The main differences may be found when one investigates the facet of adjustment to work. Given that those returning of their own initiative are not returning to a position within a parent company, they must seek out their own employment. This adds a further source of stress and upheaval to an already difficult repatriation process.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study and hence requires further empirical verification. Nonetheless the study provides some useful signposts for future study in the area.

Originality/value

This research is unique in that it bridges a significant lacuna in the existing international human resource management literature by concentrating on the self‐initiated repatriation experience (SRE). This research is all the more important given that increasing numbers of individuals have returned to Ireland to seek work at their own discretion with the advent of the Celtic Tiger.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Stephen Swailes and Michelle Blackburn

Despite a large literature on talent management there is very little research on the comparative attitudes of employees in talent pools with those not in talent pools…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite a large literature on talent management there is very little research on the comparative attitudes of employees in talent pools with those not in talent pools. This is an important omission as employee reactions should influence how effective talent programmes are and how they can be designed and evaluated. Consequently, the purpose of this paper is to explore the work-related attitudes of employees who are members and non-members of talent pools.

Design/methodology/approach

Matched samples of employees working in a single public sector, scientific organization were surveyed using a standard survey and open questioning to elicit and compare the voices of included and excluded employees.

Findings

Employees in talent pools were more positive about their future prospects than employees outside talent pools who reported feelings of lower support from the organization, stronger feelings of unfairness and had lower expectations of the organization’s interest in them.

Research limitations/implications

More matched-sample studies are necessary to further understand how employee reactions to talent pool membership are mediated by context.

Practical implications

Organizations should consider how employees will react to the design and implementation of talent pools and try to alleviate any adverse reactions. Two threats in particular are the depression of affect among excluded employees and failure to sustain positive affect among the included employees.

Originality/value

This is one of very few studies to explore employee reactions to talent programmes in a single organization. The single-site design controls for a large number of variables that confound inter-organizational studies of talent pool membership.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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