Search results

1 – 10 of 532
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Rebecca Collins, Caitlin Notley, Tim Clarke, Jon Wilson and David Fowler

Whilst there are pockets of excellence in the provision of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), many services fail to meet young people’s needs…

Abstract

Purpose

Whilst there are pockets of excellence in the provision of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), many services fail to meet young people’s needs. Considering this, the purpose of this paper is to ascertain perceptions of CAMHS provision in a rural county of the UK to inform re-design of youth mental health services.

Design/methodology/approach

The study comprised of two phases: phase one involved analysis of questionnaire data of youth views of CAMHS. Phase two involved analysis of the “Have Your Say” event data which explored perceptions of CAMHS and future service re-design. Data were thematically analysed.

Findings

Knowledge of the existence and purpose of CAMHS was variable. Participants wanted accessible information about services, rights, confidentiality and for this to be provided in multiple media. Young people wanted staff who were easy to talk to, genuine, understanding and who valued their insights. Participants wanted to be offered choice about appointments, location and timing. An ideal mental health service was described as a “one-stop-shop” of co-locality and multi-agency collaboration. Young people clearly expressed a desire to influence the design and delivery of the radical service re-design and to be embedded in its development.

Practical implications

The results highlighted multiple problems with CAMHS provision and provided a clear justification for the re-design of services.

Originality/value

This was a novel approach demonstrating the importance, utility and power of effective participatory practices for informing the re-design of services.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

David Fowler, Jon Musgrave and Jill Musgrave

This organizational climate empirical case study involves a religious organization in the United States of America, which has experienced a substantial decline in…

Abstract

Purpose

This organizational climate empirical case study involves a religious organization in the United States of America, which has experienced a substantial decline in membership and weekly service participation numbers over the previous five years. The purpose of this qualitative case study is to reveal motivating factors that drive parishioners to leave or stay within a traditional protestant congregation and to uncover the strengths and weaknesses within the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology behind the study considers personal observation by the author and engages current and former members of the organization as well as front-line employees and senior leadership. Qualitative essays were completed through Qualtrics by participants and analyzed with the use of MAXQDA software for thematic frequency and organization.

Findings

During analysis, correlations were found to exist between the church's membership decline and ineffectiveness of senior leadership. Also, it is quite evident that the church's strengths were found in the quality of its members and the relationships they developed. This was found to be a significant motivation to stay within the organization.

Originality/value

The study provides value to practitioners within organizational development fields. Usage of this knowledge could assist in providing insights into possible reasons why religious organizations falter under ineffective leadership, which in turn could provide opportunities to implement improvements based on discoveries.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Suzanne Leonard and David Fowler

The National Examining Board for Supervisory Management now has anew award which has received recognition from NCVQ at Management Level4. NEBSM Centres across the country…

Abstract

The National Examining Board for Supervisory Management now has a new award which has received recognition from NCVQ at Management Level 4. NEBSM Centres across the country have been assessing competences routinely for some time, and their findings have proved invaluable in helping to diagnose the learning needs of students, identify procedures for the training of workplace assessors, and contribute to the refinement of NEBSM procedures for the monitoring of workplace assessment. Covers the experience of these Centres in introducing a competence‐based programme including some of the problems they have faced. It also presents certain issues to be considered by Centres thinking of offering competence‐based programmes, including the necessity for training of college tutors, the necessary increase in marketing activity, and the high costs involved with running this type of course.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Article

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Collection Building, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Collection Building, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

John Hollister

Investigates “cruising” (how homosexual men move around to various meeting sites), and how men keep this from intruding into their “normal” lives. Highlights how Laud…

Abstract

Investigates “cruising” (how homosexual men move around to various meeting sites), and how men keep this from intruding into their “normal” lives. Highlights how Laud Humphreys researched this phenomenon through, initially, observing 12 “tearoom” regulars, while acting as a lookout. Herein the author primarily observed a highway rest area, but also urban parks, tearooms and commercial sex clubs – interviewing 19 regulars. Gives more specific details in the article. Concludes that cruising sites are not constant and uniform.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 24 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 61 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Kate-Riin Kont

The purpose of this paper is to mainly find out how well is time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) suits for a university library setting in Estonia. For this purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to mainly find out how well is time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) suits for a university library setting in Estonia. For this purpose, all activities related to acquisitions process were identified and recorded in detail, and the cost of all these activities related to acquisition process in Estonian university libraries based on the example of the TDABC method were anlyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used in this paper is based on a review of relevant literature to provide an overview of the concept of the different cost accounting methods suitable for the measurement of the acquisition process. Through a case study, conducted among Estonian university libraries, the TDABC approach was used to analyze the acquisition process in university libraries. More specifically, the acquisition process studied concerned print format books, audiovisual documents and sheet music, and covered acquisition processes such as receipt of orders, ordering documents, communication with bookshop (if necessary), receiving documents and communication with the customer.

Findings

On the basis of the current study it can be said the TDABC methodology seems to be one of the best tools for understanding cost behavior and for refining a cost system for university libraries. While analyzing the results, it appeared that the difference in time and cost for acquiring a document can be remarkable and concerns both – acquiring foreign documents (documents from other countries) and acquiring domestic documents, and between the university libraries chosen for the current study.

Originality/value

The subject of cost accounting as a performance measurement method is in general an unexplored field in Estonian university libraries. Time guidelines for acquiring the documents were, however, quite common in the 1980s in the USSR, including Estonia. Soviet-wide regulatory documents were issued on all library work processes, but each library could still implement their own rules. In the 1990s, the regulations were consigned to oblivion. Very few cost surveys involving different library activities have been carried out in Estonia and none have been published. Where such studies have been conducted, the results remain for internal use only.

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

1 – 10 of 532