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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Thomas D.A. Jones, David Flynn, Marc P.Y. Desmulliez, Dennis Price, Matthew Beadel, Nadia Strusevich, Mayur Patel, Chris Bailey and Suzanne Costello

This study aims to understand the influence of megasonic (MS)-assisted agitation on printed circuit boards (PCBs) electroplated using copper (Cu) electrolyte solutions to improve…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand the influence of megasonic (MS)-assisted agitation on printed circuit boards (PCBs) electroplated using copper (Cu) electrolyte solutions to improve plating efficiencies through enhanced ion transportation.

Design/methodology/approach

The impact of MS-assisted agitation on topographical properties of the electroplated surfaces was studied through a design of experiments by measuring surface roughness, which is characterised by values of the parameter Ra as measured by white light phase shifting interferometry and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy.

Findings

An increase in Ra from 400 to 760 nm after plating was recorded for an increase in acoustic power from 45 to 450 W. Roughening increased because of micro-bubble cavitation energy and was supported through direct imaging of the cavitation. Current thieving effect by the MS transducer induced low currents, leading to large Cu grain frosting and reduction in the board quality. Current thieving was negated in plating trials through specific placement of transducer. Wavy electroplated surfaces, due to surface acoustic waves, were also observed to reduce the uniformity of the deposit.

Research limitations/implications

The formation of unstable transient cavitation and variation of the topology of the Cu surface are unwanted phenomena. Further plating studies using MS agitation are needed, along with fundamental simulations, to determine how the effects can be reduced or prevented.

Practical implications

This study can help identify manufacturing settings required for high-quality MS-assisted plating and promote areas for further investigation, leading to the development of an MS plating manufacturing technique.

Originality/value

This study quantifies the topographical changes to a PCB surface in response to MS agitation and evidence for deposited Cu artefacts due to acoustic effects.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 July 2019

Jack Hinton, Dejan Basu, Maria Mirgkizoudi, David Flynn, Russell Harris and Robert Kay

The purpose of this paper is to develop a hybrid additive/subtractive manufacturing platform for the production of high density ceramic components.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a hybrid additive/subtractive manufacturing platform for the production of high density ceramic components.

Design/methodology/approach

Fabrication of near-net shape components is achieved using 96 per cent Al3O2 ceramic paste extrusion and a planarizing machining operations. Sacrificial polymer support can be used to aid the creation of overhanging or internal features. Post-processing using a variety of machining operations improves tolerances and fidelity between the component and CAD model while reducing defects.

Findings

This resultant three-dimensional monolithic ceramic components demonstrated post sintering tolerances of ±100 µm, surface roughness’s of ∼1 µm Ra, densities in excess of 99.7 per cent and three-point bending strength of 221 MPa.

Originality/value

This method represents a novel approach for the digital fabrication of ceramic components, which provides improved manufacturing tolerances, part quality and capability over existing additive manufacturing approaches.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2021

Jiju Antony, Michael Sony, Olivia McDermott, Raja Jayaraman and David Flynn

Quality 4.0 incorporates the role of automation and digitization and provides competitive advantage for organizations by enhancing customer experience and increase profitability…

1819

Abstract

Purpose

Quality 4.0 incorporates the role of automation and digitization and provides competitive advantage for organizations by enhancing customer experience and increase profitability. The purpose of this study is to critically examine the organizational readiness factors for the successful implementation of Quality 4.0 implementation and assess their importance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies a quantitative research methodology to examine readiness factors of Quality 4.0 in organizations by 147 senior management professionals in various organizations including manufacturing and service companies in America, Asia and Europe participated through an online survey.

Findings

The readiness factors for Quality 4.0 were critically ranked amongst manufacturing and service organizations by senior management professionals from three continents. Five significant reasons for non-adoption of Quality 4.0 were lack of resources, inability to link Quality 4.0 with the corporate strategy and objectives, lack of understanding of benefits, high initial investment and the current quality management strategy and methods are already delivering good results hence unsure of the need for Quality 4.0. The handling of big data in quality management was the most important factor for adopting Quality 4.0, irrespective of the size and nature of the organization. More accuracy and less errors and improved decision-making the factors of adopting Quality 4.0 in service sector were not significant for manufacturing sector. Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) reported that costs and time savings over the long run were not so significant.

Practical implications

This study is focussed on the significance of pros and cons of adopting Quality 4.0 in organizations. Senior managers in both large and SMEs can benefit immensely from understanding before investing heavily towards implementing Quality 4.0. The importance of identified organizational readiness factors for the successful adoption of Quality 4.0 can be used as indicators to understand how ready an organization is to implement Quality 4.0. The top three readiness factors for the successful adoption of Quality 4.0 were identified as: top management commitment, leadership and organizational culture. Improved understanding of the readiness factors can be highly beneficial to senior quality professionals in both manufacturing and service companies in the journey towards successful implementation of Quality 4.0.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study on assessing Quality 4.0 readiness factors at an intercontinental level and therefore serves as a foundation for many future studies. The study provides a theoretical foundation for the Quality 4.0 in terms of organizational readiness for successful adoption and overcoming implementation challenges. During the planning, implementation and progress review of Quality 4.0, review the readiness factors while planning and resourcing a Quality 4.0 implementation strategy to ensure effective performance.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Eden Carmichael and David O'Flynn

Eden Carmichael and David O'Flynn ‐ user of mental health services and psychiatrist ‐ discuss what they learned about the barriers we professionals erect to ‘user participation’…

Abstract

Eden Carmichael and David O'Flynn ‐ user of mental health services and psychiatrist ‐ discuss what they learned about the barriers we professionals erect to ‘user participation’ from the experience of attending an international conference together.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Sophie J. Chambers

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the Police and Crime Commissioners have been scrutinised in their first nine months in office, focusing primarily on one particular…

1075

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the Police and Crime Commissioners have been scrutinised in their first nine months in office, focusing primarily on one particular force area.

Design/methodology/approach

A brief analysis of the most current writing on this topic, including official documents such as minutes of police and crime panel meetings and Home Affairs Committee and Welsh Affairs Committee evidence sessions, as well various online news sources are provided. Academic literature spanning 30 years is also drawn upon.

Findings

In considering particular major events in the first nine months of the implementation of Police and Crime Commissioners, central government have been required to take a more prominent role in scrutiny in certain regions than first envisaged, due to ambiguity of legislative guidelines.

Research limitations/implications

As an exploratory paper, one force area (Gwent) is the primary focus, sampled because of the issues faced in that area and its widespread coverage in the media.

Practical implications

Problems with the legislative guidance for Police and Crime Commissioners, Police and Crime Panels and other involved agencies and individuals are highlighted.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the body of research investigating how the new policing governance framework in England and Wales is unfolding in practice. It is informed by both academic perspectives and real life examples.

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

David O'Flynn

Network in Lewisham, thirteen employment, education and training projects in Lewisham, south‐east London, are working together to create a full vocational rehabilitation service…

Abstract

Network in Lewisham, thirteen employment, education and training projects in Lewisham, south‐east London, are working together to create a full vocational rehabilitation service for people with mental health problems. This is a complex process. This paper reviews the background, and the local development of the Network in Lewisham, and draws some early conclusions.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Randolph Flynn, Tom McCombs and David Elloy

The selection process used by an organisation employing theautonomous work group (AWG) structure is reported. What makes thiscompany′s approach worthy of consideration is the fact…

Abstract

The selection process used by an organisation employing the autonomous work group (AWG) structure is reported. What makes this company′s approach worthy of consideration is the fact that they now have more than 14 years of successful experience using the team concept. Plant personnel and training specialists have identified a group of salient characteristics which, in their experience, have played a major role in facilitating high performance and contributing to the compatibility of the individual within the team structure.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2009

Anne Bernassau, David Hutson, Christine E.M. Demore, David Flynn, Farid Amalou, Jonathan Parry, Jim McAneny, Tim W. Button, Marc P.Y. Desmulliez and Sandy Cochran

High‐frequency transducer arrays that can operate at frequencies above 30 MHz are needed for high‐resolution medical ultrasound imaging. The fabrication of such devices is…

Abstract

Purpose

High‐frequency transducer arrays that can operate at frequencies above 30 MHz are needed for high‐resolution medical ultrasound imaging. The fabrication of such devices is challenging not only because of the fine‐scale piezocomposite fabrication typically required but also because of the small size of arrays and their interconnects. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of research to develop solutions for several of the major problems in high‐frequency ultrasound array fabrication.

Design/methodology/approach

Net‐shape 1‐3 piezocomposites operating above 40 MHz are developed. High‐quality surface finishing makes photolithographic patterning of the array electrodes on these fine scale piezocomposites possible, thus establishing a fabrication methodology for high‐frequency kerfless ultrasound arrays.

Findings

Structured processes are developed and prototype components are made with them, demonstrating the viability of the selected fabrication approach. A 20‐element array operating at 30 MHz is patterned and characterised. Furthermore, an electrode pattern suitable for a 20‐element array operating at 100 MHz is created to demonstrate the state of the art of photolithography processing directly on piezocomposite.

Practical implications

The work reported suggests that ultrasound arrays for real‐time biomedical imaging will be viable at higher frequencies than presently available commercially or previously reported in the research literature.

Originality/value

The main elements of a novel, fully mask‐based process for high‐frequency ultrasound transducer array fabrication are presented in outline in this paper.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Judy Scott

Abstract

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2010

David Woodger and Jim Cowan

In this article, we return to a piece of work we did with two NHS trusts in the mid 1990s that focused squarely on tackling institutional racism. We do this for two reasons…

703

Abstract

In this article, we return to a piece of work we did with two NHS trusts in the mid 1990s that focused squarely on tackling institutional racism. We do this for two reasons. First, because we feel that the current context for equalities may be obscuring the need to continue to find ways to tackle institutional racism. Second, we brought together very achievable survey and group work techniques in a co‐produced process, which makes tackling institutional racism less laden with rhetoric and much more of a practical proposition. This article articulates a three‐staged approach to identifying racism operating inside the trusts, an appraisal of the experience of black patients and the development of learning groups. In these learning groups, black and white practitioners and managers engaged with each other on their impacts and relationships with black patients, thereby changing their practices with all patients. What achieves equality of health service response from this experience is the creation of an environment in which practitioners can become self‐motivated in re‐working ‘with and for themselves’ the way they work with patients based on a recognition of racial identities in service relationships.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

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