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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2017

Angela Connelly

In March 2015, following unseasonable heavy precipitation, the River Am burst its banks flooding the village of Ambridge and causing one death and numerous injuries. The…

Abstract

In March 2015, following unseasonable heavy precipitation, the River Am burst its banks flooding the village of Ambridge and causing one death and numerous injuries. The lines between fiction and reality became blurred when the BBC offered updates about the weather situation in Ambridge through social media. However, in fiction, as in reality, memories are short; recent village gossip in Ambridge has been dominated by other matters including a certain murder trial and the mix-up with Jill Archer’s chutney. The flood has come and gone.

In this chapter, I will examine the response to, and recovery from, the floods in Ambridge in order to ascertain what lessons have been learned, and whether enough has been done to make Ambridge more resilient to future floods events. I will show how the programme raised important issues in relation to flooding management in England today, and focus upon the increasing responsibilisation of citizens, the tension which exists between framing the flood response in terms of ‘resilience’ or ‘vulnerability’, and the need for people to find someone or something to blame for their misfortune. I conclude that The Archers could play a critical role in maintaining flood awareness in the future.

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Custard, Culverts and Cake
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-285-7

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Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Zulkiflee Ibrahim, Abu Bakar Fadzil, Amat Sairin Demun, Mazlin Jumain, Md Ridzuan Makhtar, Noraliani Alias, Nurfarhain Mohamed Rusli and Fenny Baseng

The Best Management Practices for Sustainable Urban Drainage System including On-Site Detention have been introduced in the Storm Water Management Manual for Malaysia…

Abstract

The Best Management Practices for Sustainable Urban Drainage System including On-Site Detention have been introduced in the Storm Water Management Manual for Malaysia. Flash floods are becoming frequent in the urbanised areas in this country. Inefficient drainage system has been highlighted as one of the factors. Urban drains were reported incapable of coping with the unexpected heavy rainfall. Concrete drains are favourable in construction industry for economic reasons. An experimental research was conducted out to investigate the effectiveness of infiltration integration with drainage system to reduce flash flood. This laboratory research was conducted in the Universiti Teknologi Malaysia. Experiments were performed for selected drainage bed slopes and focussed on several spacing between precast drain sections along the system. The total and infiltrated flow rates, water surface and velocity profiles were examined. The results showed that drain flow rates were reduced by 60.9%–89.6% when the spacing between drain sections were enlarged. Meanwhile, the flow depths in drain sections were dropped by 48.2%–68.9%, and the water velocity was lowered up to 49% as the spacing between drain sections were increased. The study found that the drainage bed slope also influenced the performance of the infiltrated concrete drainage system.

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Water Management and Sustainability in Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-114-3

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

David Flood and Carol‐Ann Farkas

This paper seeks to examine the value of teaching about mental illness through the use of literature.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the value of teaching about mental illness through the use of literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the examples of two colleges in eastern USA that focus on educating students for healthcare careers, the paper examines two different course formats for using literature to teach about mental illness: a course that places the topic within the larger context of medicine and literature; and a freestanding madness and literature course.

Findings

While professional education tends towards specialization, it can lead to a monocultural vision that limits approaches to patients and problems alike. Courses integrating mental illness and literature were found to be effective means of counteracting this trend.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to two healthcare‐centred colleges in eastern USA.

Practical implications

For mental health clinicians and healthcare professionals in general, literature broadens the scope of both perspectives and analytical tools for understanding mental disorders and responses to them.

Originality/value

While literature courses often contain such themes as mental illness, courses that truly integrate literature with mental illness meet a growing need for interdisciplinary education as a means of preparing more flexibly thinking healthcare professionals.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Paul Crawford, Charley Baker and Brian Brown

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1043

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Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2020

Wayne Visser

For the purpose of applied research, we are interested in deriving and measuring multi-level future resilience, from a human capital perspective. This paper aims to set…

Abstract

Purpose

For the purpose of applied research, we are interested in deriving and measuring multi-level future resilience, from a human capital perspective. This paper aims to set the theoretical foundations for a future resilience index to be launched in 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review of the literature on individual, organisational and socio-ecological resilience, the researcher has distilled 10 elements of future resilience. These were elaborated into a 20-question index, which has been piloted with an anonymous organisation.

Findings

The 10 elements of future resilience, which the index will seek to measure include: emergency preparedness; creative adaptability; technological empowerment; dynamic employability; diversity cultivation; participative governance; systemic responsiveness; resource efficiency; purposeful motivation; and well-being orientation. Illustrative findings from the pilot show that organisational support for resilience across all 10 categories is seen as weaker than individuals’ perception of their own level of resilience.

Practical implications

The areas of strong versus weak performance revealed by the index, either individually or in terms of organisational support, give organisations a clear set of priorities for follow-up.

Social implications

This paper has demonstrated that future resilience is a highly relevant and useful concept for society, organisations and individuals in these rapidly changing times.

Originality/value

Through the future resilience index, being developed by Antwerp Management School in collaboration with Randstad, this paper wants to encourage behaviours and capacities amongst employees that will increase resilience at the individual, organisational and socio-ecological levels. This is the first multi-level resilience measurement instrument aimed at human capital measurement.

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Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Kelum Jayasinghe

This study aims to address the possibility of integrating some elements of the “radical constructivist” approach to management accounting teaching. It answers the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address the possibility of integrating some elements of the “radical constructivist” approach to management accounting teaching. It answers the following two questions: to what extent should management accounting educators construct a “radical constructivist” foundation to guide active learning? Then, in which ways can management accounting educators use qualitative methods to facilitate “radical constructivist” education?

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a teaching cycle that implements innovative learning elements, e.g. learning from ordinary people, designed following the principles of “radical constructivism”, to engage students with “externalities” at the centre of their knowledge construction. It adopts an ethnographic approach comprising interviews and participant observation for the data collection, followed by the application of qualitative content and narrative analysis of the data.

Findings

The study findings and reflections illustrate that the majority of students respond positively to radical constructivist learning if the educators can develop an innovative problem-solving and authentic environment that is close to their real lives. The radical constructivist teaching cycle discussed in this study has challenged the mindsets of the management accounting students as it altered the traditional objectivist academic learning approaches that students were familiar with. Its use of qualitative methods facilitated active learning. Student feedback was sought as part of the qualitative design, which provided a constructive mechanism for the students and educators to learn and unlearn from their mistakes. This process enriched the understanding of learners (students) and educators of successful engagement in radical constructivist management accounting education and provides a base upon which to design future teaching cycles.

Originality/value

The paper provides proof of the ability of accounting educators, as change agents, to apply radical constructivist epistemology combined with multiple qualitative research methods by creating new constructive learning structures and cultures associated with innovative deep-learning tasks in management accounting education.

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Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Victor Oluwasina Oladokun, David G. Proverbs and Jessica Lamond

Flood resilience is emerging as a major component of an integrated strategic approach to flood risk management. This approach recognizes that some flooding is inevitable…

Abstract

Purpose

Flood resilience is emerging as a major component of an integrated strategic approach to flood risk management. This approach recognizes that some flooding is inevitable and aligns with the concept of “living with water.” Resilience measurement is a key in making business case for investments in resilient retrofits/adaptations, and could potentially be used to inform the design of new developments in flood prone areas. The literature is, however, sparse on frameworks for measuring flood resilience. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a fuzzy logic (FL)-based resilience measuring model, drawing on a synthesis of extant flood resilience and FL literature.

Design/methodology/approach

An abstraction of the flood resilience system followed by identification and characterization of systems’ variables and parameters were carried out. The resulting model was transformed into a fuzzy inference system (FIS) using three input factors: inherent resilience, supportive facilities (SF) and resident capacity.

Findings

The resulting FIS generates resilience index for households with a wide range of techno-economic and socio-environmental features.

Originality/value

It is concluded that the FL-based model provides a veritable tool for the measurement of flood resilience at the level of the individual property, and with the potential to be further developed for larger scale applications, i.e. at the community or regional levels.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Edmund C. Penning‐Rowsell, Edward P. Evans, Jim W. Hall and Alistair G.L. Borthwick

The Foresight Future Flooding (FFF) project researched flood risk in the UK to the year 2100 for central government, using scenarios and a national risk assessment model

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1019

Abstract

Purpose

The Foresight Future Flooding (FFF) project researched flood risk in the UK to the year 2100 for central government, using scenarios and a national risk assessment model backed by qualitative analysis from panels of some 45 senior scientists. The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of the project, both nationally and internationally.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper assesses the impact of the FFF project, both nationally and internationally, using web searches, document analysis, and a questionnaire survey of key actors in the flood risk management policy field.

Findings

It was found that the penetration of the project into professionals' consciousness was high in relation to other comparable projects and publications, and its impact on policy – both immediately and continuing – was profound. The FFF initiative did not create policy change, however, but facilitated its legitimation, adding impetus to what was already there, as one element of a part‐catalytic and part‐incremental process of policy evolution.

Research limitations/implications

Special circumstances, internal and external to the project, mean that this cannot be a simple model for matching research to policymakers' needs in the future.

Practical implications

Important lessons may be learnt from this project about both the methods of forward‐looking foresight‐type research, and the way that its results are disseminated to its target audiences.

Originality/value

This is an innovative attempt to assess the impact of a new type of foresight project.

Details

Foresight, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Namrata Bhattacharya-Mis, Jessica Lamond, Burrell Montz, Heidi Kreibich, Sara Wilkinson, Faith Chan and David Proverbs

Improved management of commercial property at risk from flooding may result from well-targeted advice from built environment (BE) professionals, such as surveyors, valuers…

Abstract

Purpose

Improved management of commercial property at risk from flooding may result from well-targeted advice from built environment (BE) professionals, such as surveyors, valuers and project managers. However, research indicates that the role of these professionals in providing such advice is currently limited for a variety of reasons. This paper aims to investigate the (perceived and real) barriers and opportunities for providing such advice in a number of international locations. In particular, the research sought greater understanding of the link between regulation and guidance; perceived roles and capacity; and training and education needs.

Design/methodology/approach

To cover different international settings, an illustrative case study approach was adopted within the selected countries (Australia, UK, USA, China and Germany). This involved a qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews of BE professionals with experience of advising on commercial properties at risk of flooding. Due to the specific nature of these interviews, a purposive sampling approach was implemented, leading to a sample of 72 interviews across the five international locations.

Findings

Perceived barriers were linked to regulatory issues, a shortage of suitably experienced professionals, a lack of formal guidance and insurance requirements. BE professionals defined their roles differently in each case study in relation to these factors and stressed the need for closer collaboration among the various disciplines and indeed the other key stakeholders (i.e. insurers, loss adjusters and contractors). A shortage of knowledgeable experts caused by a lack of formal training, and education was a common challenge highlighted in all locations.

Originality/value

The research is unique in providing an international perspective on issues affecting BE professionals in providing robust and impartial advice on commercial property at risk of flooding. While acknowledging the existence of local flood conditions, regulatory frameworks and insurance regimes, the results indicate some recurring themes, indicating a lack of general flood risk education and training across all five case study countries. Learning across case studies coupled with appropriate policy development could contribute toward improved skills development and more consistent integration of BE professionals within future flood risk management practice, policy and strategy.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Dr David Proverbs

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586

Abstract

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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