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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

David F. Elloy

The purpose of this paper was to examine the impact of superleader behaviors in self‐managed work teams, on organization commitment, job satisfaction and organization self‐esteem.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine the impact of superleader behaviors in self‐managed work teams, on organization commitment, job satisfaction and organization self‐esteem.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected on‐site over a period of three days from employees working in a non‐union paper mill located in a small rural community in the northwestern region of the USA. The survey was completed by 141 employees, representing a 9 per cent response rate. Self‐leadership, organization commitment, job satisfaction and organization self‐esteem were all measured using different instruments.

Findings

The results indicated that teams groups that were led by a supervisor who exhibited the characteristics of a superleader had higher levels of organization commitment, job satisfaction, and organization self‐esteem.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a small sample and relied on self‐report data, thereby allowing for the possibility of same source bias. However, this is a common problem with cross‐sectional designs.

Practical implications

Leading in a self‐managed work team environment requires a unique approach to leadership. The results of this study illustrated that superleader behaviors result in some beneficial outcomes for organizations including enhanced levels of organization commitment, job satisfaction and organization self‐esteem. It behoves organizations to encourage, through training programs, the development of these behaviors.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

David F. Elloy and Catherine R. Smith

The dual‐career phenomenon has become increasingly prevalent worldwide. This lifestyle often generates stresses and strains, at home and at work, for couples juggling…

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6039

Abstract

The dual‐career phenomenon has become increasingly prevalent worldwide. This lifestyle often generates stresses and strains, at home and at work, for couples juggling multiple demands, which can have negative consequences for organisations. While most empirical research into this lifestyle has been conducted in the United States and Britain, very little has been carried out in Australia. This particular study, based on data from an Australian sample of 121 lawyers and accountants, was therefore aimed at analysing the levels of stress, work‐family conflict and overload among dual‐career and single‐career couples. The results confirm that dual‐career couples experience higher levels of stress, work‐family conflict and overload than single‐career couples. To enhance labour productivity and organisational effectiveness, human resource managers therefore need to take account of the potential for dual‐career stress, overload and conflict, and respond flexibly to dual‐career employee status.

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Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

David F. Elloy and Catherine Smith

The dual‐career phenomenon has become increasingly prevalent worldwide. For couples juggling multiple demands, this lifestyle often generates stresses and strains at home…

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1491

Abstract

The dual‐career phenomenon has become increasingly prevalent worldwide. For couples juggling multiple demands, this lifestyle often generates stresses and strains at home and at work, which can have negative consequences for organizations. Most empirical research into this lifestyle often generates stresses and strains at home and at work, which can have negative consequences for organizations. Most empirical research into this lifestyle has been conducted in the United States and Britain, and very little has been carried out in Australia. This particular study, based on data from an Australian sample of 62 lawyers and accountants, analysed the antecedents of work‐family conflict among dual‐career couples. The results confirm that overload, role conflict and role conflict significantly effect work‐family conflict. To enhance labour productivity and organisational effectiveness, therefore, human resource managers need to take account of the potential for dual‐career overload and conflict, and respond flexibly to dual‐career employee status.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

David F. Elloy

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between self‐leadership behaviors in a self‐managed work team environment and relevant organizational variables…

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6612

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between self‐leadership behaviors in a self‐managed work team environment and relevant organizational variables, i.e. supervisory trust, decision‐making, feedback and team goal setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected on‐site over a period of three days from employees working in a non‐union paper mill located in a small rural community in the northwestern region of the USA. The survey was completed by 141 employees, representing a 99 per cent response rate. Self‐leadership, supervisory trust, decision‐making, feedback and team goal setting were measured using different scales.

Findings

The results indicated that supervisors, who give feedback, and who are perceived as trusting, and encouraging innovative behaviors contribute to the development of self‐leadership behaviors of rehearsal, self‐goal setting, self‐criticism, self‐reinforcement, self‐expectation and self‐observation. In addition, providing team training, fostering communication within the team, and allowing the team members to make work related decisions also enhance the movement toward self‐management.

Research limitations/implications

The study relied on self‐report data, thereby allowing for the possibility of same source bias. However this is a common problem with cross‐sectional designs.

Originality/value

The paper is of value in pointing out that a different approach to leadership is required in a self‐managed work team environment, and by suggesting that building trust, fostering communication within the team, giving feedback and encouraging goal setting, innovative behaviors, and decision‐making can contribute to the development of self‐leadership behaviors important to the success and effectiveness of self‐managed work teams. Organizations should therefore through training programs encourage the development of these behaviors.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 31 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

David F. Elloy and Tom McCombs

Describes the application of open systems theory in a manufacturing plant. Outlines the theoretical foundation on which the intervention was based, as well as a…

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2094

Abstract

Describes the application of open systems theory in a manufacturing plant. Outlines the theoretical foundation on which the intervention was based, as well as a description of the team design, compensation system and plant organization.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Aditya Simha, David F. Elloy and Han-Chung Huang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between two components of job burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) and organizational cynicism…

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2680

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between two components of job burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) and organizational cynicism. Another aim of this research was to examine the role of moderating variables such as role conflict, work-family conflict, perceived fairness, and trust in coworkers on the relationship between burnout and organizational cynicism.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology was a survey-based quantitative method. Totally, 172 nurses in a Taiwanese hospital were surveyed, and 169 completed responses were obtained. The nurses filled out self-report surveys that measured their levels of burnout, organizational cynicism, and various other variables including demographic variables.

Findings

The results indicate that several variables acted as moderators in the relationship between emotional exhaustion and organizational cynicism, and in the relationship between depersonalization and organizational cynicism. Trust in coworker, perceived fairness, and role conflict all were found to negatively influence the relationship between a burnout component and cynicism, whereas work-family conflict had a positive influence on the relationship between depersonalization and cynicism.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this research are that the study is cross-sectional in nature, and is based on a Taiwanese sample. Future research should aim to study these variables in a longitudinal fashion and in different contexts.

Practical implications

The practical implications from this study include managers being able to harness various variables (such as perceived fairness and trust in coworkers) in order to reduce cynicism.

Originality/value

The value of this study is that it connects burnout and organizational cynicism together. It also uncovers several moderating variables that influence the relationship between burnout and organizational cynicism. This is also one of the first studies that have obtained a positive effect of role conflict.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

David Elloy and Kenneth S. Anderson

The organisation may suffer whenindividuals face problems in meetingthe demands both of family andworkplace. A survey in a heavyindustry plant revealed differencesbetween…

Abstract

The organisation may suffer when individuals face problems in meeting the demands both of family and workplace. A survey in a heavy industry plant revealed differences between married workers and non‐married workers in three components of burnout. The results are analysed.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Radha R. Sharma and Sir Cary Cooper

Abstract

Details

Executive Burnout
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-285-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

James L. Price

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool…

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11566

Abstract

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool, seeks to improve measurement in the study of work organizations and to facilitate the teaching of introductory courses in this subject. Focuses solely on work organizations, that is, social systems in which members work for money. Defines measurement and distinguishes four levels: nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio. Selects specific measures on the basis of quality, diversity, simplicity and availability and evaluates each measure for its validity and reliability. Employs a set of 38 concepts ‐ ranging from “absenteeism” to “turnover” as the handbook’s frame of reference. Concludes by reviewing organizational measurement over the past 30 years and recommending future measurement reseach.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 18 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

New Directions in the Future of Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-298-0

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