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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2019

Natalie Claire Haynes and David Egan

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the continued interest in the concept of “miniaturism” has seen the micropub develop into the new format of the microbar and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the continued interest in the concept of “miniaturism” has seen the micropub develop into the new format of the microbar and examines the drivers of this trend. It then reflects on the possible implications of the rise of the microbar concept on the future of the urban tourism destination landscape.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that is built on the natural curiosity of future studies to use an understanding of the present to predict what will happen next and what the implications of those developments will be.

Findings

The paper provides a clear definition of the microbar and identifies four distinctive drivers behind its conception, linked to changes in consumer behaviour. These cover the rise of the micro-break, the need for responsible urban regeneration, consumers desire for immediate and unique experiences and increasingly diverse populations. The paper predicts that these trends will drive an increase in microbars leading to greater tourist mobility in the urban tourism destination, more fragmentation and heterogeneity of products and services as well as an intensification in the need for authentic experiences and opportunity driven development giving rise to a hybrid form of guerrilla hospitality. Ultimately the authors predict that the venue will become more important than the specific location when consumers view the landscape of the urban tourism destination.

Originality/value

The focus of previous academic research has been on the historic development of the micropub and its impact on regeneration and communities, but very little literature has examined the rise of the microbar and the potential implications for the urban tourism destination.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

David Egan and Natalie Claire Haynes

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceptions that managers have of the value and reliability of using big data to make hotel revenue management and pricing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceptions that managers have of the value and reliability of using big data to make hotel revenue management and pricing decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-stage iterative thematic analysis technique based on the approaches of Braun and Clarke (2006) and Nowell et al. (2017) and using different research instruments to collect and analyse qualitative data at each stage was used to develop an explanatory framework.

Findings

Whilst big data-driven automated revenue systems are technically capable of making pricing and inventory decisions without user input, the findings here show that the reality is that managers still interact with every stage of the revenue and pricing process from data collection to the implementation of price changes. They believe that their personal insights are as valid as big data in increasing the reliability of the decision-making process. This is driven primarily by a lack of trust on the behalf of managers in the ability of the big data systems to understand and interpret local market and customer dynamics.

Practical implications

The less a manager believes in the ability of those systems to interpret these data, the more they perceive gut instinct to increase the reliability of their decision making and the less they conduct an analysis of the statistical data provided by the systems. This provides a clear message that there appears to be a need for automated revenue systems to be flexible enough for managers to import the local data, information and knowledge that they believe leads to revenue growth.

Originality/value

There is currently little research explicitly investigating the role of big data in decision making within hotel revenue management and certainly even less focussing on decision making at property level and the perceptions of managers of the value of big data in increasing the reliability of revenue and pricing decision making.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Nicki Pombier

Purpose: This chapter proposes narrative allyship across ability as a practice in which nondisabled researchers work with disabled nonresearchers to co-construct a process…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter proposes narrative allyship across ability as a practice in which nondisabled researchers work with disabled nonresearchers to co-construct a process that centers and acts on the knowledge contained in and expressed by the lived experience of the disabled nonresearchers. This chapter situates narrative allyship across ability in the landscape of other participatory research practices, with a particular focus on oral history as a social justice praxis.

Approach: In order to explore the potential of this practice, the author outlines and reflects on both the methodology of her oral history graduate thesis work, a narrative project with self-advocates with Down syndrome, and includes and analyzes reflections about narrative allyship from a self-advocate with Down syndrome.

Findings: The author proposes three guiding principles for research as narrative allyship across ability, namely that such research further the interests of narrators as the narrators define them, optimize the autonomy of narrators, and tell stories with, instead of about, narrators.

Implications: This chapter suggests the promise of research praxis as a form of allyship: redressing inequality by addressing power, acknowledging expertise in subjugated knowledges, and connecting research practices to desires for social change or political outcomes. The author models methods by which others might include in their research narrative work across ability and demonstrates the particular value of knowledge produced when researchers attend to the lived expertise of those with disabilities. The practice of narrative allyship across ability has the potential to bring a wide range of experiences and modes of expression into the domains of research, history, policy, and culture that would otherwise exclude them.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb008720. When citing the…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb008720. When citing the article, please cite: Tim Knowles, David Egan, (2001), “The Changing Structure of UK Brewing and Pub Retailing”, International Journal of Wine Marketing, Vol. 13 Iss: 2, pp. 59 - 72.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

David Egan, Tim Knowles and Joudallah Bey

The licensed retail market in the UK operates in a dynamic environment, yet one aspect that appears to get little consideration is how spatial location may determine the…

Abstract

The licensed retail market in the UK operates in a dynamic environment, yet one aspect that appears to get little consideration is how spatial location may determine the success of particular business or, influence the appropriate use of an existing licensed premises. This paper suggests that it is possible to develop a model of location that can help to explain the location of licensed premises. Additionally, it explores the type of criteria that should be explicitly considered when establishing a new development or the repackaging of an existing licensed unit. At the outset it should be emphasised that the authors are not trying to explain the location of all licensed premises but a model of intra‐urban location, rooted in economic theory, to try and explain the location of different types of licensed businesses within urban areas. The aim is to develop a model that will explain the observable spatial pattern of licensed premises within the major cities of the UK.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Tim Knowles and David Egan

This article charts the major structural changes that have occurred in both UK brewing and pub retailing during the period 1989–2000. A key theme has been the rapid…

Abstract

This article charts the major structural changes that have occurred in both UK brewing and pub retailing during the period 1989–2000. A key theme has been the rapid consolidation of the brewing sector in an attempt to achieve economies of scale in production, distribution and marketing. The dominance of the national brewers has allowed them to place increased product emphasis on marketing and me power of brands — particularly lager, me national breweries control all me major lager brands. In tandem with these brewers, me growth and dominance of me national pub chains has garnered apace over the past ten years and in order to maximise profit margins they have established supply arrangements with me national brewers; it has been in the interests of these chains to limit choice thereby maximising the discounts received from their suppliers. The article therefore shows that regional and local brewers cannot compete on price. Competition between pubs is also highlighted. Because beer prices are relatively inelastic, emphasis is placed on the level of amenities provided in pubs, and in particular the branding of pub outlets. Key among these amenities is the provision of food, which now accounts for a substantial percentage of total pub sales.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1992

David Shipley and Colin Egan

Hostile environmental developments are requiring British brewingcompanies to reshape their archaic distribution strategies. Examinesperceptions of the relationships…

Abstract

Hostile environmental developments are requiring British brewing companies to reshape their archaic distribution strategies. Examines perceptions of the relationships existing between brewers and their contractually‐tied public house tenants. Finds that brewers apply excessive coercive power and insufficient reward power and that in consequence there is extensive channel conflict and insufficient co‐operation. Concludes that brewers are ineffective channel leaders and makes recommendations for them to introduce a “partnership” orientation to their distribution strategies.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

David Egan and Alison Bell

This paper explores the massive growth in New World Wines and in particular more recently in Chilean Wines over recent years. It analyses a number of factors influencing…

Abstract

This paper explores the massive growth in New World Wines and in particular more recently in Chilean Wines over recent years. It analyses a number of factors influencing this trend, including price, taste, distribution and so on, yet highlights one important aspect is the on‐shelf impact of New World, and in particular, Chilean Wines. This evaluation of the on‐the‐shelf impact of Chilean wines would appear to support the hypothesis that at least part of the current success of Chilean wines is concerned with image, particularly on‐the‐shelf image in an era of the global brand. As Old World Wine producers copy the modern dynamic image of the New World Wines and in particular Chilean Wines, will the Chilean Wines be identifiable on the shelf or will on‐the‐shelf image reflect price rather than country?

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

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