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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Charles Ikerionwu, David Edgar and Edwin Gray

The decision to operate BPO-IT organisational model by a business process outsourcing (BPO) service provider has far reaching benefits. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The decision to operate BPO-IT organisational model by a business process outsourcing (BPO) service provider has far reaching benefits. The purpose of this paper is to develop a service provider’s BPO-IT framework that provides in-house IT function (software) required to process client services.

Design/methodology/approach

The multi-case study adopted an exploratory sequential mixed method research approach. In the first instance, seven BPO service provider organisations were investigated in the qualitative phase and 156 in the quantitative phase, respectively.

Findings

The adoption of the developed framework indicates that it could reduce failures in BPO relationships through reduced turnaround time in processing client services, improved quality of service, reduced cost, improved client and provider’s competitiveness, and confidentiality of client operations. Outsourcing clients could lay the foundation for a successful relationship by adopting a selection process that could choose the right provider.

Originality/value

The paper reveals BPO-IT organisation’s operation towards in-house provision of software required to process client services. A research exploring BPO service providers from a top outsourcing destination like India could provide offshore outsourcing clients the information to move towards onshore outsourcing.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Richard Hanage, Jonathan M Scott and Mark A.P. Davies

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how digital creative graduates develop new businesses on graduating from university, and how their creative, business and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how digital creative graduates develop new businesses on graduating from university, and how their creative, business and personal lives interact until their nascent ventures fail financially.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven digital creative nascent graduate entrepreneurs were followed for up to five years. Although independently assessed as having promise of business success, they were young and lacked business experience. They were followed through six-monthly semi-structured interviews which investigated their business, creative and personal development. The interviews were transcribed and key statements manually coded and extracted for analysis to identify issues, tipping points and outcomes.

Findings

The primary contribution is the finding that, despite a promising beginning and very generous start-up support, all seven nascent ventures failed financially and most were closed down in favour of employment, particularly when personal issues such as parenthood sharpened the need for stable levels of income. The graduates demonstrated weaknesses in their commercial skills, especially selling (human capital) and insufficient utilization of networks (social capital) so that in the mainly mature low entry-barrier markets they were entering they were at a disadvantage from the outset. The research has also demonstrated the value of a real-time longitudinal qualitative approach to investigating businesses from business start-up to eventual exit.

Practical implications

The insights gained have practical implications for start-up and survival support for creative graduate businesses, as well as raising issues about the effectiveness of postgraduate entrepreneurship education and cultural policy relating to this economically important sub-sector.

Originality/value

The longitudinal approach has brought new insights and indicates several areas where more research would be valuable, especially in dealing with the consequences of unsuccessful nascent business ventures.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1901

At a recent inquest upon the body of a woman who was alleged to have died as the result of taking certain drugs for an improper purpose, one of the witnesses described…

Abstract

At a recent inquest upon the body of a woman who was alleged to have died as the result of taking certain drugs for an improper purpose, one of the witnesses described himself as “an analyst and manufacturing chemist,” but when asked by the coroner what qualifications he had, he replied : “I have no qualifications whatever. What I know I learned from my father, who was a well‐known ‘F.C.S.’” Comment on the “F.C.S.” is needless.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

David A. Edgar, David L. Litteljohn and Myrtle L. Allardyce

Short breaks are one important segment of the overall tourism market.They provide a distinct market sector with, it appears, specialcompetitive strategies. While the…

Abstract

Short breaks are one important segment of the overall tourism market. They provide a distinct market sector with, it appears, special competitive strategies. While the growth and value of this market sector is undisputed, little attention has been paid to the strategic nature of short break provision, or the potential of movement in strategic space. Using data gathered from personal interviews and applying the concept of strategic group clusters and strategic space, explores strategy and performance differences of companies operating in the UK short break market. Examines correlation between structural variables of market scope, company size; and sources of competitive advantage in relation to prime strategies adopted. Draws conclusions with regard to shifts in strategic space for performance enhancement, and potential future market developments.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 6 June 2019

Hugo Letiche

What is systemicity and what is its relationship to third-generation cybernetics, will be explored here. I begin where my published work in social complexity theory let…

Abstract

What is systemicity and what is its relationship to third-generation cybernetics, will be explored here. I begin where my published work in social complexity theory let off: What is the benefit of studying experienced emergence versus attributed emergence? And how do we account for researcher reflexivity in the study of emergence? Is systemicity really an ontological given; that is, an inevitability of any rigorous relational position? Or, is it more an accompaniment to a layered (physical, life, social) epistemology? Or, is systemicity an invitation to acknowledge the ontological limits of perception, cognition, and truth? And finally, assuming that systemicity represents third-generation cybernetics, where and how in organizational studies do we recognize our own reflexivity and relation to what we study, to whom we address our ideas, and how we communicate?

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Management and Organization Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-552-8

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Jon Landry, David Edgar, John Harris and Kevin Grant

This paper aims to investigate, through the lens of the principal–agent problem, the relationship between payment of National Hockey League (NHL) salaries and player…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate, through the lens of the principal–agent problem, the relationship between payment of National Hockey League (NHL) salaries and player performance during the period of 2005-2011 and explore the inherent issues within the NHL player compensation and incentive structure.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts a pragmatic philosophy with deductive reasoning. This paper focuses on the NHL season 2005-2011 and undertake analysis of historical player contracts and performance data of 670 players across 29 clubs to undertake liner regression analysis.

Findings

This paper quantifies potential inefficiencies of NHL league contracts and defines the parameters of the principal–agent problem. It is identifies that player performance generally increases with salary, is higher in the first year of a contract and despite decreasing over the life of the contract, will usually peak again in the final year of the contract.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based around figures from 2005-2011 and secondary statistical data. The study captures quantitative data but does not allow for an exploration of the qualitative perspective to the problem.

Practical implications

Entry-level or first contracts are good for all teams and players because they provide incentive to perform and a reduction of risk to the team should a player not perform to expectations. The same can be said for players at the other end of the spectrum. Although not typically used much, performance bonuses for players over the age of 35 allow clubs to “take a chance” on a player and the player can benefit by reaching attainable bonuses. These findings therefore provide contributions to the practicing managers and coaches of NHL teams who can consider the results to help shape their approach to management of players and the planning of teams and succession planning for talent.

Originality/value

The paper presents a comprehensive and current perspective of the principal–agent problem in NHL and extends the work of Purcell (2009) and Gannon (2009) in understanding player performance enhancement.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 38 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-785-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Elaine Crichton and David Edgar

Through primary research based on interviews with key executives in20 of the largest hotel groups operating in the UK short‐break market,presents the case that in the UK…

Abstract

Through primary research based on interviews with key executives in 20 of the largest hotel groups operating in the UK short‐break market, presents the case that in the UK short‐break market complexity is deliberately being managed to enhance rewards for hotel groups and that this protects market share by raising supplier complexity and gains additional market share through lowering complexity for the consumer. Argues that the key element in managing complexity is the use of supply‐and demand‐side technology, and that as the technology develops further the concept of managing complexity as opposed to simply minimizing or adapting to it will become more widespread. Contends that such developments have key implications for the future structure of the UK short‐break market and indeed other hospitality‐based markets of the future.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 7 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

David A. Edgar and Laura Nisbet

With reference to the concepts of chaos theory, proposes that long‐term strategic planning is of little benefit to businesses (especially small businesses) operating in…

Abstract

With reference to the concepts of chaos theory, proposes that long‐term strategic planning is of little benefit to businesses (especially small businesses) operating in the hospitality industry, and that managerial focus should emphasize innovative and creative practices in order to sustain competitive advantage. To achieve this, organizations need to have a clear vision of where they want to be and attempt to achieve this aim by adapting to situations as they arise. Today’s hospitality organizations should not try and overcome their environment by predicting future outcomes but instead should change and adapt with the environment.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

David A. Edgar

Considerable literature exists on the nature of yield management (YM) and capacity strategies. One strategy for maximizing revenue yield, rooms or supplementary spend is…

Abstract

Considerable literature exists on the nature of yield management (YM) and capacity strategies. One strategy for maximizing revenue yield, rooms or supplementary spend is the provision of short breaks. Short breaks in the UK are widely recognized as a growth market. However, little literature exists on the supply or strategic dimensions of the market. Provides an overview of the supply dimension of UK short break markets, focusing on hotel operations. Examining the short break activities of 20 hotel companies in the UK, through personal interviews with key marketing executives, draws comparisons in performance between the use of various short break strategies. Explores the apparent impact of such strategies relative to supplementary spend and market segments, and draws conclusions as to how short break markets can be actively employed as a capacity management tool.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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