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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2017

Mahesh Subramony, Karen Ehrhart, Markus Groth, Brooks C. Holtom, Danielle D. van Jaarsveld, Dana Yagil, Tiffany Darabi, David Walker, David E. Bowen, Raymond P. Fisk, Christian Grönroos and Jochen Wirtz

The purpose of this paper is to accelerate research related to the employee-facets of service management by summarizing current developments in multiple research streams…

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1569

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to accelerate research related to the employee-facets of service management by summarizing current developments in multiple research streams, providing propositions, and articulating new directions for theory and empirical inquiry.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven scholars provide short reviews of the core topics and findings from four employee-related research streams – collective turnover, service climate, emotional labor, and occupational stress; and generate propositions to guide future theoretical and empirical work. Four distinguished service scholars – David Bowen, Ray Fisk, Christian Grönroos, and Jochen Wirtz comment upon these research streams and provide future directions for accelerating employee-related research in service management.

Findings

All four research-streams yield insights that have the potential to advance service management research. Commentaries from the distinguished scholars further integrate this work with key concerns within service management including technology-enablement, transformative services, and service strategy.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in its scope of coverage of management topics related to service and its aim to promote interdisciplinary dialog between service management scholars and researchers conducting employee-related research relevant to services.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Raymond P. Fisk, Linda Alkire (née Nasr), Laurel Anderson, David E. Bowen, Thorsten Gruber, Amy L. Ostrom and Lia Patrício

Elevating the human experience (HX) through research collaborations is the purpose of this article. ServCollab facilitates and supports service research collaborations…

Abstract

Purpose

Elevating the human experience (HX) through research collaborations is the purpose of this article. ServCollab facilitates and supports service research collaborations that seek to reduce human suffering and improve human well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

To catalyze this initiative, the authors introduce ServCollab's three human rights goals (serve, enable and transform), standards of justice for serving humanity (distributive, procedural and interactional justice) and research approaches for serving humanity (service design and community action research).

Research implications

ServCollab seeks to advance the service research field via large-scale service research projects that pursue theory building, research and action. Service inclusion is the first focus of ServCollab and is illustrated through two projects (transformative refugee services and virtual assistants in social care). This paper seeks to encourage collaboration in more large-scale service research projects that elevate the HX.

Practical implications

ServCollab seeks to raise the aspirations of service researchers, expand the skills of service research teams and build mutually collaborative service research approaches that transform human lives.

Originality/value

ServCollab is a unique organization within the burgeoning service research community. By collaborating with service researchers, with service research centers, with universities, with nonprofit agencies and with foundations, ServCollab will build research capacity to address large-scale human service system problems. ServCollab takes a broad perspective for serving humanity by focusing on the HX. Current business research focuses on the interactive roles of customer experience and employee experience. From the perspective of HX, such role labels are insufficient concepts for the full spectrum of human life.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

David E. Bowen and Robert Johnston

This paper introduces the concept of “internal service recovery” defined as what the organisation does to make internal customers (front‐line employees), who have…

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4720

Abstract

This paper introduces the concept of “internal service recovery” defined as what the organisation does to make internal customers (front‐line employees), who have recovered external customers from service failure, feel less frustrated and more confident of their ability to deal with dissatisfied customers in the future. Internal service recovery often requires reducing employees’ feelings of low perceived control and helplessness. The results from an exploratory study of staff and managers in four branches of a UK bank shows that although the concept and practice of external service recovery is well understood, internal reovery is not. It is suggested that the “traditional” ingredients of external recovery (response, information, action and compensation) may be appropriate for the internal customer. It is also suggested that the passive, alienated employee behaviour associated with “learned helplessness” may need to be addressed through additional interventions. The purpose of the paper is to encourage both researchers and managers to examine how the effectiveness of internal service recovery affects external service recovery and the satisfaction of both employees and customers.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

David E. Bowen and William E. Youngdahl

The desirability of transferring manufacturing logic and practices to service operations, strongly advocated by Levitt (1972; 1976) in two classic Harvard Business Review

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19481

Abstract

The desirability of transferring manufacturing logic and practices to service operations, strongly advocated by Levitt (1972; 1976) in two classic Harvard Business Review articles two decades ago, is now commonly challenged by both service researchers and practitioners. We defend a “production‐line approach to service” by arguing that services can “reindustrialize” by applying revised, progressive manufacturing technologies. We describe how services businesses such as Taco Bell, Southwest Airlines, and Shouldice Hospital have mastered what we call “lean” service ‐ the application of lean manufacturing principles to their own service operations. Overall, services tend to be innovation laggards, compared to manufacturing. Looking ahead, mass customization can be viewed as the convergence of service and manufacturing logic.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Deborah L. Kellogg, William E. Youngdahl and David E. Bowen

Presents a programme of research from which a typology of service customers’ quality assurance behaviours was developed. The typology’s four behaviours define the broad…

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7868

Abstract

Presents a programme of research from which a typology of service customers’ quality assurance behaviours was developed. The typology’s four behaviours define the broad range of service customers’ participation in service quality assurance. Examines the relationship between these behaviours and satisfaction. Presents an initial conceptualization of a service customer’s value chain constructed from these behaviours. Provides implications for services marketing, human resource management and service operations. In sum, the two conceptual frameworks presented in this research add to researchers’ and practitioners’ understanding of how customer participation in service delivery is related to satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Caren Siehl, David E. Bowen and Christine M. Pearson

Rites of integration can establish the appropriate level ofpsychological involvement between service providers and customers duringthe service encounter. This facilitates…

Abstract

Rites of integration can establish the appropriate level of psychological involvement between service providers and customers during the service encounter. This facilitates customers sharing information necessary for service production and the favourable evaluation by customers of the cues they perceive during the service delivery process. The design of alternative rites that result in varying levels of involvement are described, as are the consequences associated with customers having their expectations of involvement confirmed or disconfirmed.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Naresh K. Malhotra

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Jane Kingman‐Brundage, William R. George and David E. Bowen

Offers a “service logic model” as a managerial tool fortackling cross‐functional issues embedded in service systems. Uncoversand describes the logical components inherent…

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3694

Abstract

Offers a “service logic model” as a managerial tool for tackling cross‐functional issues embedded in service systems. Uncovers and describes the logical components inherent in the three key service management functions – marketing, operations and human resources‐and suggests that the real management challenge, above and beyond cross‐functional co‐ordination, is integration of these components as the real drivers of service experience. A step‐by‐step template is offered for using service logic to achieve the fundamental grass roots integration required in the creation of outcomes valued for customers.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Ruth N. Bolton and Crina O. Tarasi

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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