Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

David E. Booth, Moutaz Khouja and Michael Hu

Industrial robots are increasingly used by many manufacturingfirms. The number of robot manufacturers has also increased, with manyof these firms now offering a wide range…

Abstract

Industrial robots are increasingly used by many manufacturing firms. The number of robot manufacturers has also increased, with many of these firms now offering a wide range of robots. A potential user is thus faced with many options in both performance and cost. Proposes a decision model for the robot selection problem using both a robustified Mahalanobis distance analysis, i.e. a multivariate distance measure, and principal‐components analysis. Unlike most other models for robot selection, this model takes into consideration the fact that a robot′s performance, as specified by the manufacturer, is often unobtainable in reality. The robots selected by the proposed model become candidates for factory testing to verify manufacturers′ specifications. Tests the proposed model on a real data set and presents an example.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Arlyn J. Melcher, Moutaz Khouja and David E. Booth

Presents a classification for production systems in manufacturing and processing industries. The proposed classification is intended to enlarge the scope of production…

2085

Abstract

Presents a classification for production systems in manufacturing and processing industries. The proposed classification is intended to enlarge the scope of production systems that can be meaningfully classified. This is accomplished by including production system properties used in previous classifications and incorporating new characteristics that describe major changes in emerging automated production systems. The proposed classification is intended to provide better understanding of the functioning of production systems and management approaches available to improving their processes.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Noeline J. Kyle

Very little Australian literature looks at women as leaders ineducation. Using theoretical viewpoints emerging out of a biographicaland historical analysis, it is possible…

Abstract

Very little Australian literature looks at women as leaders in education. Using theoretical viewpoints emerging out of a biographical and historical analysis, it is possible to construct a more inclusive model of leadership which includes both men and women in the past. Mapping such a process historically and biographically can give a detailed assessment of the social, historical and political dimensions of particular women leaders′ lives and also develop a theoretical framework, which gives equal status to the leadership experiences more common to women. Presents a historical narrative where recording lives raises critical questions at the same time as it unearths new evidence of the history of women educationists in Australia.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 April 2022

Bernhard F. Bichler, Tanja Petry, Andreas Kallmuenzer and Mike Peters

This chapter provides a roadmap for a systematic literature review built around the guiding questions of basic research design. First, we highlight the relevance and…

Abstract

This chapter provides a roadmap for a systematic literature review built around the guiding questions of basic research design. First, we highlight the relevance and development of systematic literature reviews in tourism research. Second, we put the systematic review into perspective by outlining its characteristics and by clarifying the methodological assumptions. Third, we bring together recommendations based on previous research and review guidelines and present a step-by-step tutorial for a systematic literature review. From this chapter, readers will understand the foundations of systematic literature reviews, will be able to apply the methodology to their review projects and are introduced to further readings and best practice examples.

Details

Contemporary Research Methods in Hospitality and Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-546-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1993

Stephen J. French, Nicholas W. Read, David A. Booth and Susan Arkley

Eating and drinking temporarily suppress the desire to eat and/orthe desire to drink. These satiating effects are learned responses tocomplex patterns of stimulation from…

Abstract

Eating and drinking temporarily suppress the desire to eat and/or the desire to drink. These satiating effects are learned responses to complex patterns of stimulation from available foods and drinks and the external and internal environments. Considers the possible roles of physiological actions of ingested foods and beverages in the signals from the body which contribute to the sense of repletion, the dulling of hunger and the quenching of thirst.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 95 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Niklas Kreander, Ken McPhail and David Molyneaux

While the literature contains a number of studies of ethical investment funds, relatively little is known about church investment processes and practices despite the…

3550

Abstract

While the literature contains a number of studies of ethical investment funds, relatively little is known about church investment processes and practices despite the significant role they have played in the development of the sector. This paper attempts to address this lacuna by studying the ethical investment programmes of two UK churches: the Methodist Church and the Church of England. The paper initially explores the relationship between the Judaeo‐Christian church and the development of the ethical investment movement. This history reveals an engagement both at the institutional and individual level that challenges the assumed sacred secular divide now commonplace within the literature and the more recent guardian‐advocate dichotomy. Second, the paper delineates the way in which the churches theologically conceptualise this engagement and describes how these values are proceduralised through the operation of the funds. The final section provides an immanent critique of church investments both at a performative and theological level. The aim of this concluding section is to engage with the churches in exploring the broader potential for the church in effecting social change.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 January 2016

Abstract

Details

Storytelling-Case Archetype Decoding and Assignment Manual (SCADAM)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-216-0

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Mark Piney, Diane Llewellyn, Rachel O'Hara, John Saunders, John Cocker, Kate Jones and David Fishwick

Exposure to isocyanates was the leading cause of occupational asthma in the UK. Motor vehicle repair (MVR) bodyshop paint sprayers were at greatest risk, despite…

1780

Abstract

Purpose

Exposure to isocyanates was the leading cause of occupational asthma in the UK. Motor vehicle repair (MVR) bodyshop paint sprayers were at greatest risk, despite widespread use of air-fed breathing apparatus and ventilated booths. Most paint sprayers work in small and medium enterprises (SMEs). The purpose of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) project, described in this paper, is to improve exposure control measures in at least 20 per cent of MVR bodyshops, and reduce the risk of occupational asthma. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-stranded plan consisted of: Safety and Health Awareness Days (SHADs); workplace inspections; and third-party stakeholder communications. The impact of various parts of the project were evaluated.

Findings

Approximately 18 per cent of bodyshops in the UK attended one of 32 SHADs, following which over 90 per cent of delegates expressed an “intention to act” to improve exposure control measures. A local assessment showed that at least 50 per cent of bodyshops improved exposure control measures. An evaluation of 109 inspections found that enforcement action was taken at 40 per cent of visits. Third-party engagement produced a joint HSE-industry designed poster, new agreed guidance on spray booths and dissemination of SHAD material. Knowledge of booth clearance time has become widespread, and 85 per cent of booths now have pressure gauges. Biological monitoring data show that, post-SHAD, exposures were lower.

Originality/value

A sustained national project using clear, relevant, tested messages delivered via different routes, had a sector-wide impact in bodyshops. It is probable that the project has improved isocyanate exposure control in at least 20 per cent of bodyshops. The generic lessons could be applied to other widespread SME businesses.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1977

The connotations, associations, custom and usages of a name often give to it an importance that far outweighs its etymological significance. Even with personal surnames or…

Abstract

The connotations, associations, custom and usages of a name often give to it an importance that far outweighs its etymological significance. Even with personal surnames or the name of a business. A man may use his own name but not if by so doing it inflicts injury on the interests and business of another person of the same name. After a long period of indecision, it is now generally accepted that in “passing off”, there is no difference between the use of a man's own name and any other descriptive word. The Courts will only intervene, however, when a personal name has become so much identified with a well‐known business as to be necessarily deceptive when used without qualification by anyone else in the same trade; i.e., only in rare cases. In the early years, the genesis of goods and trade protection, fraud was a necessary ingredient of “passing off”, an intent to deceive, but with the merging off Equity with the Common Law, the equitable rule that interference with “property” did not require fraudulent intent was practised in the Courts. First applying to trade marks, it was extended to trade names, business signs and symbols and business generally. Now it is unnecessary to prove any intent to deceive, merely that deception was probable, or that the plaintiff had suffered actual damage. The equitable principle was not established without a struggle, however, and the case of “Singer” Sewing Machines (1877) unified the two streams of law but not before it reached the House of Lords. On the way up, judical opinions differed; in the Court of Appeal, fraud was considered necessary—the defendant had removed any conception of fraud by expressingly declaring in advertisements that his “Singer” machines were manufactured by himself—so the Court found for him, but the House of Lords considered the name “Singer” was in itself a trade mark and there was no more need to prove fraud in the case of a trade name than a trade mark; Hence, the birth of the doctrine that fraud need not be proved, but their Lordships showed some hesitation in accepting property rights for trade names. If the name used is merely descriptive of goods, there can be no cause for action, but if it connotes goods manufactured by one firm or prepared from a formula or compsitional requirements prescribed by and invented by a firm or is the produce of a region, then others have no right to use it. It is a question of fact whether the name is the one or other. The burden of proof that a name or term in common use has become associated with an individual product is a heavy one; much heavier in proving an infringement of a trade mark.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 79 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Mike Akroyd, Janet Allison, Sarah Booth, Carole Gilligan, David Harrison, Victoria Holden and Rebecca Mace

Seclusion is the supervised containment of a patient, away from others, when immediately necessary to manage safety on a psychiatric inpatient ward. When seclusion is…

Abstract

Purpose

Seclusion is the supervised containment of a patient, away from others, when immediately necessary to manage safety on a psychiatric inpatient ward. When seclusion is necessary, it should be used for the shortest time possible, with a regular multidisciplinary review of the patient’s mental and physical health, medication and risk guiding decisions around continuation or ending of this restrictive measure. However, many medical and nursing staff can be anxious about taking part in such reviews. Simulation has been used in many areas of medicine to help people to develop competence and confidence, in a safe setting where their own needs can be paramount. This paper aims to describe the use of a blended learning approach, including simulation, to build confidence and competence amongst healthcare professionals in the safe review of seclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

A multidisciplinary group, including input from individuals with lived experience of use of seclusion, put together a one-day training course, which included group debate exploring the relationship between seclusion and the Human Rights Act, guided discussion of videos exploring some aspects of practice and a half-day of simulation where multidisciplinary teams could act as the team reviewing a patient who had been secluded.

Findings

This paper found that the course’s blended learning approach helped participants to feel more confident in their understanding of several aspects of seclusion, including what their team discussions should include before and after seeing a patient and in knowing when to end a period of seclusion.

Originality/value

While simulation is slowly becoming a more familiar component of the undergraduate and postgraduate education offer in psychiatry, the authors are unaware of any evaluation of a dedicated simulation-based training course around reviews of seclusion.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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