Search results

1 – 10 of 20
Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Andrew Alexander, David Cryer and Steve Wood

This paper seeks to evaluate the particular conditions informing locational decision making and related network planning in the charity retail sector. Its purpose is to…

3392

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to evaluate the particular conditions informing locational decision making and related network planning in the charity retail sector. Its purpose is to identify both differences and commonalities with related debates that have been focussed very largely on the grocery sector and the superstore format. Its wider purpose is to contribute to the growing literature on charity retailing which has not considered this aspect of retail management in detail.

Design/methodology/approach

Details the particularities of charity retailing locational decision making and network planning through a detailed case‐study consideration of a hospice charity's emerging retail store network.

Findings

Finds that existing conceptual and practical considerations pertaining to locational decision making in retailing require a nuanced re‐revaluation in relation to the locational and network planning of charity retailers. Identifies the importance of supply chain (stock donators) and workforce factors together with the customer demand in informing locational decision making.

Originality/value

Detailed academic consideration of location planning in the charity shop sector is absent in the literature. The paper addresses this.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Adelina Broadbridge

450

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Louisa McNair, Sarah Woodward and Pam Mount

In 2006 the Brooklands' Adapted Sex Offender Treatment Programme (ASOTP) was adopted by Calderstones Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. To date, two groups of men (n = 10…

Abstract

In 2006 the Brooklands' Adapted Sex Offender Treatment Programme (ASOTP) was adopted by Calderstones Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. To date, two groups of men (n = 10) have completed the programme and one group (n = 6) is currently in progress. This treatment model uses a cognitive behavioural framework and is a nurse‐led initiative, utilising trained ward staff. This paper discusses experiences of initiating and delivering the ASOTP programme. Several issues were encountered, including staff retention, clients discontinuing the group, the length of the group, the length of wait for clients to commence their treatment and high levels of administration. As a result of these, and developments to the Brooklands' model, several changes were made before the commencement of the second wave in 2008.The paper discusses how the ASOTP were able to overcome some, but not all, of the initial difficulties and highlights potential pitfalls for future groups.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2004

Leslie E Sekerka and Rollin McCraty

This chapter reviews literature in support of a model that predicts the effects of Appreciative Inquiry on physical health in the workplace. Studies that demonstrate the…

Abstract

This chapter reviews literature in support of a model that predicts the effects of Appreciative Inquiry on physical health in the workplace. Studies that demonstrate the physiological correlates associated with the experience of appreciation are examined. A model of emotion is proposed that shows how the heart, in concert with the brain, nervous, and hormonal systems, are fundamental components of a dynamic network from which emotional experience emerges. The authors demonstrate how favorable affective experiences and appreciative processes go hand in hand – and suggest the need for further empirical investigations in the field of positive organizational change practices.

Details

Constructive Discourse and Human Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-892-7

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Lorna Conn

Falls among older people cause significant mortality and morbidity, thus presenting a serious issue for older people and health and social care professionals alike. The…

Abstract

Falls among older people cause significant mortality and morbidity, thus presenting a serious issue for older people and health and social care professionals alike. The simple occurrence of a fall conceals the range of physical, psychological, social and environmental factors, which can contribute to this event. Research advocates that professionals should engage with health promotion and develop individualised preventions in order to minimise risk of falling. In this study, a multi‐disciplinary, falls prevention initiative was developed with older people who had recently fallen. The initiative started with a common assessment but was followed by a variable, individualised programme of different interventions. The older people involved were assessed pre‐ and post‐intervention, using a questionnaire checklist, on several different dimensions associated with falling. Outcomes were assessed in terms of reduction in risk and the incidence of falls, both of which were found to be statistically significant in several of the identified dimensions post‐intervention. Consequently, it could be estimated that approximately 44 falls were prevented through this nine‐month initiative. This study would support the integration of this falls prevention initiative into routine community care practice through the existing over‐75 health check and the development of a specialised falls team. Further research would be beneficial to follow up whether the reduction in the incidence of falling is sustained over time. Enhanced participation of user, carer, voluntary and community partners is recommended as this would allow older people themselves to play an active role in improving their own well‐being and that of others.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 June 2013

Petros A. Kostagiolas, Eva Papadaki, Georgos Kanlis and Sozon Papavlasopoulos

The global recession which began in 2008 affected the entire world including the European economy, with some countries being influenced more than others. At the end of…

Abstract

The global recession which began in 2008 affected the entire world including the European economy, with some countries being influenced more than others. At the end of 2012 the Greek economy was encountering a fourth consecutive year of deep recession while pressures to cut expenses in all sectors were still growing and making headline news. Academic libraries, which are dependent upon state funding, were experiencing the consequences of constant and deep budget cutbacks during that period. After a review the literature on the impact of the economic crisis on academic libraries in Greece, as well as at the international level, this chapter describes the results of a survey of Greek higher education academic libraries about the consequences of the devastatingly harsh economic environment in which they currently, and probably will continue to, exist. A survey was conducted online with 25 out of the 37 academic library directors in Greece. After analyzing the survey results, the authors describe strategies to sustain services and resources and propose strategies to adjust to a new fiscal reality. These strategies include synergies and alliances that academic libraries can achieve with various agencies within their educational institutions and/or externally. While the results are limited to a small number of academic libraries in one European country, all types of libraries can utilize the strategies outlined in this chapter.

Details

Mergers and Alliances: The Wider View
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-479-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Jonathan Lean

The purpose of this paper is to investigate PhD student perceptions of the importance of enterprise skills and the extent to which they are currently being developed…

1140

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate PhD student perceptions of the importance of enterprise skills and the extent to which they are currently being developed within a case university.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed an electronic survey of 500 PhD students across six faculties, and 128 useable responses were returned. Students were asked to rate the importance of a range of enterprise skills and attributes derived from the literature, plus the extent to which these skills and attributes had been developed through their programme of study.

Findings

The majority of PhD students recognise the importance of enterprise skills and attributes, particularly those associated with communication, confidence, achieving outcomes, determination and problem solving. Whilst some enterprise skills and attributes are developed well through PhD study, others – such as managing finance and people – are not. A number of these are skills that might be particularly relevant to early‐career PhD graduates.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to one case institution, and further research is required to investigate how the training and development gaps identified might be best addressed.

Originality/value

The study examines enterprise education within the novel context of postgraduate research studies. It identifies a need to re‐examine our approach to the training and development of PhD students in order to address their evolving career needs.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 September 2015

Patrick B. Patterson

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the culture in the logging industry in the East Kootenay/Columbia region in British Columbia, Canada, is changing as warm…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the culture in the logging industry in the East Kootenay/Columbia region in British Columbia, Canada, is changing as warm winters resulting from climate change drive expansion of a native tree-killing pest, the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae).

Methodology/approach

The paper is derived from historical records and 11 months of ethnographic fieldwork conducted from July 2010 to May 2011.

Findings

This analysis found that the insect outbreaks are generating a heightened sense of economic and physical vulnerability in the logging industry, undermining previous assumptions of sufficiency and confidence.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents results from a study of a specific region, and caution should be used when comparing these results with similar phenomena in other contexts.

Social implications

The forest industry is an important employer throughout the British Columbia interior; the cultural changes documented here indicate that climate change, manifested in insect outbreaks, is generating cultural dislocation that can have negative consequences beyond the immediate economic impacts.

Originality/value

This paper provides a detailed analysis of how an unanticipated consequence of climate change is driving adjustments in a subculture in a technologically advanced society.

Details

Climate Change, Culture, and Economics: Anthropological Investigations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-361-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2017

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2017

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

1 – 10 of 20