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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Linda Logan, William B. Harley, Joan Pastor, Linda S. Wing, Naftaly Glasman, Lee Hanson, David Collins, Barbara A. Cleary, Jacqueline Miller and Paul Hegedahl

Each member of the Journal’s Editorial Advisory Board reviews the state of empowerment in today’s organizations.

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Abstract

Each member of the Journal’s Editorial Advisory Board reviews the state of empowerment in today’s organizations.

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Empowerment in Organizations, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4891

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

David Collins, Ian Dewing and Peter Russell

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the jurisdictional expansion of audit into the area of UK financial regulation. The paper draws on the analytical framework of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the jurisdictional expansion of audit into the area of UK financial regulation. The paper draws on the analytical framework of new audit spaces (Andon et al., 2014, 2015), which built on the concept of regulatory space (Hancher and Moran, 1989), and characterises this new audit space as regulatory work.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an intensive reading of a variety of publicly available documentary sources, the paper investigates the role of auditors and accountants in the reporting accountants’ and skilled persons’ regimes in the UK under the Banking Act 1987 and the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000.

Findings

The paper identifies a new audit space characterised as regulatory work, which is made up of three distinct phases (and suggests the recent emergence of a fourth phase), and considers the extent to which these phases of regulatory work share common themes across new audit spaces identified by Andon et al. (2015) as independence, reporting, accreditation and mediating.

Originality/value

The paper identifies a further jurisdictional expansion of audit into a new audit space, characterised as regulatory work.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Derek Friday, Suzanne Ryan, Ramaswami Sridharan and David Collins

The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse collaborative risk management (CRM) literature to establish its current position in supply chain risk management…

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3101

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse collaborative risk management (CRM) literature to establish its current position in supply chain risk management (SCRM) and propose an agenda for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review of 101 peer-reviewed articles over a 21-year period was employed to analyse literature and synthesise findings to clarify terminology, definitions, CRM capabilities, and underlying theory.

Findings

CRM as a field of research is in its infancy and suffers from imprecise definitions, fragmented application of capabilities, and diverse theoretical foundations. The term CRM is identified as a more representative description of relational risk management arrangements. Six capabilities relevant to CRM are identified: risk information sharing, standardisation of procedures, joint decision making, risk and benefit sharing, process integration, and collaborative performance systems.

Originality/value

The paper provides a new definition for CRM; proposes a holistic approach in extending collaboration to SCRM; identifies a new capability; and provides a range of theories to broaden the theoretical scope for future research on CRM.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Dave Collins

This paper aims to identify the state of the art in Green Leases and Green Leasing in theory and practice, while also identifying how the roles and motivations of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the state of the art in Green Leases and Green Leasing in theory and practice, while also identifying how the roles and motivations of the stakeholders of “owner/landlord”, “lessee” and “facilities management” are different in a building that uses Green Leasing and Green Leases, as opposed to the one without.

Design/methodology/approach

Through existing literature and existing case studies from 1995 to the present day, this paper will identify the state of the art of Green Leases and Green Leasing and the extent to which literature-based discussions have played out in their practical application in the real estate sector. The roles of key stakeholders will be analysed and then compared to the interactions and roles identified in a theoretical model that describes the same stakeholders but from a more traditional stakeholder perspective. This will be achieved through using literature from journal papers mostly from the disciplines of built environment, facilities management, finance, investment, law, management and real estate.

Findings

The literature and case studies found in literature demonstrate a gradual move towards advancing Green Lease adoption and development. While the roles of key stakeholders do see a change in Green Leased buildings in terms of, for example, changing competencies for facilities managers (FMs) and more user engagement with their buildings sustainability, the literature indicated most of the changes are realised through a strengthening of existing interactions already evident in buildings without a Green Lease or Green Leasing.

Originality/value

This paper provides a state of the art review on the development of Green Leasing and Green Leases in theory and practice from a stakeholder perspective. It provides possibility to expand further on the changing roles of these stakeholders in Green buildings, which in turn could also positively affect the further development of Green Leases themselves, as well as sustainable certification methodologies such as Europe’s leading certification “Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method” (BREEAM).

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

David Collins

Attempts to recontextualize the study of empowerment in management by (re)tracing the linkages between the concepts of participation, democracy and empowerment. Reforging…

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1299

Abstract

Attempts to recontextualize the study of empowerment in management by (re)tracing the linkages between the concepts of participation, democracy and empowerment. Reforging the linkages between these concepts, proceeds to analyze the various conceptions to show the often neglected complexity of this area of debate, a debate seemingly lost in much of the management literature. Attempts to analyze the extent to which this loss of academic debate is mirrored by a loss of debate and representation in the workplace.

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Empowerment in Organizations, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4891

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2020

Carmel Lindkvist, Alenka Temeljotov Salaj, Dave Collins, Svein Bjørberg and Tore Brandstveit Haugen

The purpose of this study is to explore how the discipline facilities management (FM) can be developed in a smart city perspective through considering the current and new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how the discipline facilities management (FM) can be developed in a smart city perspective through considering the current and new FM services under the role of Urban FM, as well as governance structures that limit and enable it.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is primarily theoretical by examining current literature around the ideas of Urban FM and Smart Cities linking them to observations in one city aiming to be a Smart City. This specific paper focusses on maintenance management, workspace management and energy management services in a Smart City perspective.

Findings

The results outline how Urban FM can fill the gaps that are apparent in city planning through connectivity to communities and neighbourhoods using the Smart City not only approaches of optimising data but also considers prominent governance structures of FM, Urban FM, City Planning and Smart Cities. The study addresses the limitations of what can be done when cities are not organisations, which make identifying the “core business” obscure and intangible but attempts to overcome this limitation by considering social value in communities and wider linkages to the city environment.

Research limitations/implications

The paper sets out the potential of Urban FM in Smart Cities, but the findings are limited to primarily theoretical research and need further empirical examination.

Practical implications

The results indicate how facilities management can improve services in cities through the digitalisation of cities and the role of Urban FM. The study will be useful for municipalities in examining how to improve facilities, particularly in cities that aspire to be a Smart City and it is also important for policymakers in considering governance structures to meet sustainable development goals.

Originality/value

The study positions the discipline of facilities management in Smart Cities which has the potential to improve facilities in cities and the development of Urban FM.

Details

Facilities, vol. 39 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2018

Dave Collins, Antje Junghans and Tore Haugen

This paper aims to investigate the drivers and barriers for green leases and tenancies in sustainable “Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method”…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the drivers and barriers for green leases and tenancies in sustainable “Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method” (BREEAM) and “Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design” (LEED) certified office and office buildings in Norway, the UK and the USA. This study focuses on the differing perspectives between owners and tenants. It is then considered as to how these issues are dealt with during different phases of a buildings life cycle. This research is based on existing literature and semi-structured interviews that studied qualitative and quantitative elements in the context of ownership and tenancy of single and multi-tenanted sustainable office buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed-method approach involving semi-structured interviews with both qualitative and quantitative elements along with desk research, this paper evaluates how green leases and tenancies in offices and office buildings that are BREEAM and LEED certified require a reconsideration and re-evaluation of the acquisition, operation and disposal of office buildings by building owners and their tenants. These stakeholder relationships are supported theoretically using a theoretical model that outlines the interrelation between the sustainable building and the relationships of the building owner, the user and the FM service provider.

Findings

The data gathered from the interviews justify and partly contradict some of the statements within existing literature, diminishing the importance of cost and the barrier of split incentive but instead illuminate the importance of less tangible considerations such as company policy or a sustainability strategy. The results also note the realisation of a changing market for commercial real estate driven by the sustainable business needs of tenants for the occupation of workspaces.

Research limitations/implications

These findings have the potential to further develop theories and provide an insight into how the relationships between actors from a business, procurement and contractual perspective need to be developed to ensure more proactive development of green leasing of new and existing sustainable office buildings, along with where strategic attention is required during the building design, construction, operational and use phases.

Originality/value

This paper is based on original research through interviews and literature studies supported by an existing theoretical model. The results have been partly presented and initially discussed at the WBC World Congress 2016 in Tampere, Finland.

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2018

Dave Collins, Tore Haugen, Carmel Lindkvist and Christian Aamodt

The purpose of this paper is to explore how sustainable facilities management (SFM) and sustainable buildings (SB) can be designed and managed, bridging these gaps with a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how sustainable facilities management (SFM) and sustainable buildings (SB) can be designed and managed, bridging these gaps with a more integrated process. The need to bridge the traditional gap between design, construction and FM demands more effective solutions based on life cycle assessments. This also requires a coordinated approach with emerging environmental and sustainable initiatives in new and refurbished buildings. The solutions to these issues and aspects of the “Green Shift” need to be co-ordinated at the strategic and tactical levels of an organisation with an aim of further implementation at the operational level.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes the form of an exploratory approach based on six different case studies. The data have been sourced from cases studies involving interviews and documentation from large public institutions on how they manage and operate their existing buildings and how FM strategies are coordinated at all levels. A particular focus has been placed on buildings for higher education and research institutions. The authors have used a theoretical multidimensional framework for analysing the gaps based on models for sustainable development, life cycle assessments of buildings and recognised models for efficient FM. The case studies have been supported by literature research and documentation from a number of applied projects.

Findings

In conclusion, this study demonstrates that in the context of the Norwegian cases, there is currently little consistency in the degree to which the bridging of the gap between sustainable FM and SB is achieved or attempted.

Originality/value

This paper offers a contribution to the study of how public buildings approach the development of the building stock, whilst also dealing with the challenges associated with bridging the gap between the buildings and the FM that supports the building. The introduction and use of a multidimensional theoretical framework for analysing sustainability in buildings and FM creates a new platform for further research, development and implementation in practice.

Details

Facilities, vol. 37 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2014

Grit Laudel, Martin Benninghoff, Eric Lettkemann and Elias Håkansson

Evolutionary developmental biology is a highly variable scientific innovation because researchers can adapt their involvement in the innovation to the opportunities…

Abstract

Evolutionary developmental biology is a highly variable scientific innovation because researchers can adapt their involvement in the innovation to the opportunities provided by their environment. On the basis of comparative case studies in four countries, we link epistemic properties of research tasks to three types of necessary protected space, and identify the necessary and facilitating conditions for building them. We found that the variability of research tasks made contributing to evolutionary developmental biology possible under most sets of authority relations. However, even the least demanding research depends on its acceptance as legitimate innovation by the scientific community and of purely basic research by state policy and research organisations. The latter condition is shown to become precarious.

Details

Organizational Transformation and Scientific Change: The Impact of Institutional Restructuring on Universities and Intellectual Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-684-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

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73

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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