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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1980

PENNY COWELL

In our media‐orientated, image‐conscious contemporary society the librarian may very well seem particularly unfortunate, reflected in the imagination of the general public…

Abstract

In our media‐orientated, image‐conscious contemporary society the librarian may very well seem particularly unfortunate, reflected in the imagination of the general public as a fussy old woman of either sex, myopic and repressed, brandishing or perhaps cowering behind a date‐stamp and surrounded by an array of notices which forbid virtually every human activity. The media, for whom the librarian is frustration personified, have reinforced this stereotype, hitherto transmitted solely by superstition and hearsay; its greatest impact has no doubt fallen on the two‐thirds of the population who never use the library. One of its effects will be to ensure that they never do so in the future. As Frank Hatt has pointed out: “The controllers of the new media of communication … have shown a tendency to limit choices by using the considerable power of the media to limit their audience's established attitudes, simply because such limitation is good business.” The popular BBC television series, The last of the summer wine, portrayed a librarian whose vicarious sex‐life through the pages of D. H. Lawrence led to inevitably frustrated attempts to act out his fantasies in occasional under‐the‐counter forays with his similarly repressed female assistant. A Daily mail leader on an appeal against unfair dismissal made by a London Deputy Borough Librarian reiterates this concept:

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Library Review, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Jill Bradshaw

There are many definitions of profound and multiple learning disabilities. Most definitions include having a high degree of learning disability in conjunction with at…

Abstract

There are many definitions of profound and multiple learning disabilities. Most definitions include having a high degree of learning disability in conjunction with at least one other severe impairment, such as visual, auditory or physical impairments (Male, 1996; Ware, 1996; Lacey, 1998). Bunning (1997) adds that people with such disabilities are very reliant on others for support, including support in taking part in communicative events. Establishing reliable and consistent methods of communication may be exceptionally difficult (Florian et al, 2000). However, it is important to consider the individuality and extreme diversity of this population (Detheridge, 1997; Hogg, 1998), which includes variability in communication strengths and needs (Granlund & Olsson, 1999; McLean et al, 1996). Communication is often given little attention when services are planning ways of supporting individuals to participate, develop independence and make choices (McGill et al, 2000). While the individual's communication strengths and needs should remain central within any discussion, the significant others and the environment will also have an important influence. This article explores some of the communication issues experienced by people with profound and multiple learning disabilities and highlights the importance of the communication partnership within interventions.

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Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Alan Hankinson, David Bartlett and Bertrand Ducheneaut

This international survey involved 11 countries and was led and financed by Groupe ESC Rennes. The University of Portsmouth Business School headed the UK research…

Abstract

This international survey involved 11 countries and was led and financed by Groupe ESC Rennes. The University of Portsmouth Business School headed the UK research programme. Business Link Hampshire and the University of Portsmouth also financially supported the UK work. Five sectors were investigated: construction, industry, retailing, services and transport. Some 800 mailed questionnaires were returned from SMEs (small and medium enterprises) from cluster locations throughout the UK. The objective of the undertaking was to identify the key factors in the profiles of SME owner‐managers that influence business performance and to contribute to the literature. The following are the findings.

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International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1979

LAST MONTH we wrote in anticipation of the Annual General Meeting at the National Conference in Nottingham. This month we are able to comment on the event itself, which…

Abstract

LAST MONTH we wrote in anticipation of the Annual General Meeting at the National Conference in Nottingham. This month we are able to comment on the event itself, which was duly held on September 12th.

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New Library World, vol. 80 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Paul Rogers and Paul Meehan

The article seeks to show that companies should and can build winning cultures.

Abstract

Purpose

The article seeks to show that companies should and can build winning cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 365 companies in Europe, Asia and North America were surveyed for links between financial out‐performance and winning culture. Three dozen high performers were analyzed in in‐depth case studies; one from each region that has transformed its culture is presented.

Findings

Findings were that building a winning culture – which fewer than 10 per cent of companies succeed in doing, despite broad recognition that culture provides the greatest source of competitive advantage – requires five key steps: setting expectations, aligning leaders, accountability for delivery, organization‐wide consistency and communication/celebration. Winning cultures tend to display six key behaviours: high aspirations, external focus (customers and competitors), attitude of ownership, bias to action, valuing collaboration and striving for the exceptional. These can be measured through the daily performance of the company's front line.

Research limitations/implications

By definition, out‐performance is rare, but further insights into winning cultures may result when the survey of companies is extended to new regions, such as Latin America.

Practical implications

Practical implications are the winning culture key behaviours, key building steps and performance measurement identified. The article also shows that challenges and even crisis can help, rather than hinder, the transformation of a corporate culture into a winning one.

Originality/value

The article will help focus company leaders on the opportunity and challenges in building a winning culture. It identifies the key behaviours of winning cultures, key steps in building them, and how to measure their progress. It should be of value to all management levels from the chief executive to front‐line staff.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Jean-Marc F. Blanchard

There are two leading paradigms about the power balance between multinational corporations (MNCs) and states. The MNCs in Command approach takes the perspective that MNCs…

Abstract

There are two leading paradigms about the power balance between multinational corporations (MNCs) and states. The MNCs in Command approach takes the perspective that MNCs dominate states. The States in Command perspective assumes that states lord over MNCs. Each perspective suffers from noteworthy flaws. I advocate a modified bargaining power (MBP) approach to understanding the relative power of MNCs and states. I test the value of this approach by examining Microsoft's experience in China between 1987 and 2004. My study shows that that a MBP approach sheds considerable light on the aforementioned case, whereas the two leading paradigms do not.

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Value Creation in Multinational Enterprise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-475-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Tara St. John

This article outlines the findings and general implications of Mental Health Foundation research into the needs of older Asians with dementia and their carers. The project…

Abstract

This article outlines the findings and general implications of Mental Health Foundation research into the needs of older Asians with dementia and their carers. The project was carried out in an area with an Asian majority population in North West Kent. The focus is on the identification of need and on factors which block access to care and support. There are recommendations for practitioners and commissioners about raising awareness, service development and training.

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Book part
Publication date: 27 May 2017

Karin Oerlemans

In 2008 the University of Tasmania and the Tasmanian Department of Education (TasED) entered into a high-level Partnership agreement. The Partnership in Teaching…

Abstract

In 2008 the University of Tasmania and the Tasmanian Department of Education (TasED) entered into a high-level Partnership agreement. The Partnership in Teaching Excellence, funded by the Federal Smarter Schools National PartnershipsImproving Teacher Quality agreement, included higher education funded places for teachers wishing to complete a Master’s degree, and at the other end of the profession, an innovative alternative teacher education pathway for final-year pre-service teachers (PSTs), run as a competitive scholarship program. The intent of the program was threefold, to assist PSTs in becoming quality reflective practitioners with the capacity to work in high needs schools, explore ways of improving mentor teachers and PSTs’ reciprocal relationships, and increase the retention of teachers in TasED schools. Begun at a time of intense industrial action, the Partnership program appeared rather one-sided with little apparent benefit conferring to the University and was at all times highly contentious.

Using Kagan’s six stages of collaboration as a framework, and drawing on interviews with the first cohort of scholarship PSTs, and a range of personal files documenting the beginnings of the Partnership, including minutes of meetings, PST results, and unpublished reviews commissioned by the TasED, this chapter explores the beginnings of the Partnership, as together those on the ground worked out what “Partnership” meant. It presents an evaluation of those initial successful first years, including the learning outcomes of the PSTs and discusses the lessons learned for establishing future university/school Partnership. The Partnership program continued to 2013, when Federal funding for the project was discontinued.

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University Partnerships for Pre-Service and Teacher Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-265-7

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2015

Kathryn Flynn

The purpose of this article is to explore financial fraud in the private health insurance sector in Australia. Fraud in this sector has commonalities to other countries…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore financial fraud in the private health insurance sector in Australia. Fraud in this sector has commonalities to other countries with similar health systems but in Australia it has garnered some unique characteristics. This article sheds light on these features, especially the fraught relationship between the private health funds and the public health insurance agency, Medicare and the problematic impact of the Privacy Act on fraud detection and financial recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodological approach was used, and interviews were conducted with fraud managers from Australia’s largest private health insurance funds and experts in fields connected to health fraud detection.

Findings

All funds reported a need for more technological resources and higher staffing levels to manage fraud. Inadequate resourcing has the predictable outcome of a low detection and recovery rate. The fund managers had differing approaches to recovery action and this ranged from police action, the use of debt recovery agencies, to derecognition from the health fund. As for present and future harm to the industry, the funds found on-line claiming platforms a major threat to the integrity of their insurance system. In addition, they all viewed the Privacy Act as an impediment to managing fraud against their organizations and they desired that there be greater information sharing between themselves and Medicare.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the knowledge of financial fraud in the private health insurance sector in Australia.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

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