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1 – 10 of 182
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2021

Saad Zighan, Ziad Alkalha, David Bamford, Iain Reid and Zu'bi M.F. Al-Zu'bi

The purpose of this study is to investigate the structural changes needed for project-based organisations (PBOs) to synthesise their project operations and services following the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the structural changes needed for project-based organisations (PBOs) to synthesise their project operations and services following the servitisation strategy. It addresses the question of how PBOs should change their organisational structure fitting with service provision strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study followed an exploratory research method using a single in-depth case with evidence collected from 51 project managers from five different industry sectors: construction, oil and gas, IT, logistics and health care

Findings

Capitalising on organisational design theory, it has been found that successfully extending PBOs' outcomes into a system of both project output and extra services requires an adjustment of organisational structure that creates greater value for both companies and customers. This required adjustment has been divided into five main categories: (1) collaboration cross-project and customers; (2) flexible workflow, (3) decentralised decision-making, (4) wide span of control and (5) project governance. However, the findings indicate that success can only be ensured by particular mutually coordinated organisational designs with a suitable balance of products and services

Practical implications

This study presents vital indicators to PBOs practitioners when deploying servitisation within their operational strategy by adjusting the organisation's design.

Social implications

Servitisation could add both economic and social values for a diverse set of project stakeholders. However, the sustainability performance of servitisation in servitised project-based organisations is an outcome of reducing the discrepancy between project operation and service provision activities.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the body of knowledge and proposes a structural alteration process in PBOs to help align project operations and service provision activities. It explains how project-based organisations reconfigure their resources to provide services.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 January 2023

Saad Zighan, David Bamford, Iain Reid and Ahmed EL-Qasem

This study examines the criteria for evaluating the quality of servitization and the factors influencing the project–service system's success.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the criteria for evaluating the quality of servitization and the factors influencing the project–service system's success.

Design/methodology/approach

Evidence was collected through three rounds of Delphi consensus with 42 project managers.

Findings

The results indicate that the quality of servitization in project-oriented organizations is conceptualized as a cumulative construct driven by the product-service system's overall ability to offer more customer value. This value is defined by three interconnected dimensions: the service, the project and the integration system. The study also proposes a novel customer-oriented quality process with two connected levels comprising eight key factors influencing the quality of the project–service systems and nine key quality criteria that assist in evaluating the project–service systems.

Practical implications

Offering extra services is crucial for successful project-oriented organizations to deliver more customer value. The value of servitization is the combined value of products and services. The failure of one of these components to satisfy customers leads to the collapse of the whole system, which entails the need for a balanced-focus quality system toward projects and services.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the quality of servitization in project-oriented organizations, arguing that a balance between service orientation and project orientation is preferred to increase customer value and reduce the clash and ambiguity between project operations and service provision.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 40 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 June 2020

Marina Papalexi, David Bamford and Liz Breen

This study aims to explore the downstream pharmaceutical supply chain (PSC) and provides insight to the delivery process of medicines and associated operational inefficiencies.

12603

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the downstream pharmaceutical supply chain (PSC) and provides insight to the delivery process of medicines and associated operational inefficiencies.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory, qualitative approach was adopted to examine PSC inefficiency within two European contexts, namely, the UK and Greece. Data was gathered through interviews and a thematic analysis conducted to analyse the data and identify challenges faced by both supply chains(SCs).

Findings

The medicines delivery system needs to be enhanced in terms of quality, visibility, speed and cost to perform effectively. The findings demonstrated that although the healthcare SCs in the two European contexts have different operational structures, the results are in concordance with each other. Financial, communication, waste and complexity issues were the major concerns.

Research limitations/implications

To the knowledge this is the first study to examine aspects of the medicines SC via a cross-case analysis in the UK and Greece and extends the body of knowledge. A broader sample of responses is warranted to further validate these findings.

Practical implications

The study outputs can inform pharmacies’ strategic to instigate targeted improvement interventions. The implications of which may be extrapolated further to other European healthcare organisations.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the academic literature by adding further theoretical insights to SC strategy development, especially those that have been characterised as highly complex. The study identifies four key areas of intervention needed within this SC (in both countries) to promote higher level efficiencies and effectiveness.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Marina Papalexi, David Bamford, Alexandros Nikitas, Liz Breen and Nicoleta Tipi

This paper aims to evaluate the implementation of innovative programmes within the downstream domain of the pharmaceutical supply chain (PSC), with the aim of informing improved…

1281

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the implementation of innovative programmes within the downstream domain of the pharmaceutical supply chain (PSC), with the aim of informing improved service provision.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach was used to assess to what extent innovation could be adopted by hospital and community pharmacies to improve the delivery process of pharmaceutical products. Unstructured interviews and 130 questionnaires were collected and analysed to identify factors that facilitate or prevent innovation within PSC processes.

Findings

The analysis led to the creation of the innovative pharmaceutical supply chain framework (IPSCF) that provides guidance to health-care organisations about how supply chain management problems could be addressed by implementing innovative approaches. The results also indicated that the implementation of Lean and Reverse Logistics (RL) practices, supported by integrated information technology systems, can help health-care organisations to enhance their delivery in terms of quality (products and service quality), visibility (knowledge and information sharing), speed (response to customers and suppliers needs) and cost (minimisation of cost and waste).

Practical implications

The study’s recommendations have potential implications for supply chain theory and practice, particularly for pharmacies in terms of innovation adoption. The IPSCF provides guidance to pharmacies and health-care organisations to develop more efficient and effective supply chain strategies.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the academic literature as it adds novel theoretical insights to highly complex delivery process innovation.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Moheeb Abualqumboz, Paul W. Chan, David Bamford and Iain Reid

This study aims to examine reciprocal exchanges in knowledge networks using temporal differentiation of knowledge exchanges. To date, research on horizontal knowledge networks…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine reciprocal exchanges in knowledge networks using temporal differentiation of knowledge exchanges. To date, research on horizontal knowledge networks rather overlooks the temporal perspective, which could explain the dynamics of exchange in those networks.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports on a study of four horizontal knowledge networks in the UK over a period of 18 months.

Findings

The findings integrate three temporal dimensions of timescale, timeliness and time modalities. The dimensions have implications for the way knowledge is exchanged (or not), which can in turn sustain or stymie productive knowledge exchange in horizontal knowledge networks.

Research limitations/implications

The study encourages researchers to attend to the micro-processes of knowledge exchanges through the integrative framework of temporalities. While this study examined horizontal networks, future research can be extended to analysing temporalities in other types of networks.

Practical implications

It seeks to inspire practitioners to appreciate how the impacts of knowledge networks play out in/over time, and how more effective coopetitive knowledge-sharing environments can be created and sustained by taking differentiated time structures into account.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the knowledge management literature by providing a temporal perspective to understand reciprocal knowledge exchanges in horizontal knowledge networks.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2023

M. Claudia tom Dieck, Eleanor Cranmer, Alexandre Prim and David Bamford

The use of augmented reality (AR) and experiential learning go hand in hand. Although AR learning opportunities have been well discussed, there is limited empirical research on…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of augmented reality (AR) and experiential learning go hand in hand. Although AR learning opportunities have been well discussed, there is limited empirical research on the use of AR within higher education settings. Drawing from the uses and gratifications theory (U&GT), this study aims to explore the use of AR for learning satisfaction and student engagement, while also examining differences in learning styles.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used experiments with higher education students in the UK to explore the use of AR as part of the learning experience. Data from 173 students who experienced AR as part of their learning experience were analysed using partial least square analysis.

Findings

The authors found that hedonic, utilitarian, sensual and modality gratifications influence AR learning satisfaction and student engagement. Furthermore, the authors found differences between active and passive learners with regards to utilitarian (information seeking, personalisation) and sensual gratifications (immersion, presence) and effects on learning satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study developed and validated a U&GT framework incorporating different learning styles rooted in Kolb’s learning cycle. Findings provide important implications for the use of commercial AR applications as part of the learning experience within higher education settings.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Katerina Kassela, Marina Papalexi and David Bamford

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the application of quality function deployment (QFD) in a Housing Association (HA) located in the UK. Facing the problem of improving a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the application of quality function deployment (QFD) in a Housing Association (HA) located in the UK. Facing the problem of improving a company’s performance, practitioners and academics have fashioned and applied a variety of models, theories and techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

The research questions were developed from a review of the quality and process improvement literature and tested using evidence from field-based, action research within a UK HA company. The case study provides insight to the benefits and challenges arising from the application of QFD.

Findings

The results provided insight to the benefits and challenges arising from the application of a specific tool, QFD. The primary findings were: QFD can be successfully adapted, applied and utilised within the challenging environment of social housing and other sectors, such as professional services; the model can be modified to use most processes/sub-processes; it must include both external and internal requirements and, to be useful, use more detailed process parameters appropriately.

Practical implications

The conclusions drawn add to ongoing commentaries on aspects of quality improvement, especially the application of QFD within the service sector. The authors develop questions for future research regarding improvement projects.

Originality/value

The conclusion proposes that the implementation of QFD should have a positive impact upon a company; if approached in the right manner. It provides a useful mechanism for developing evidence-based strategy of operational change, control and improvement. The research proposes questions for future research into aspects of operational quality and efficiency.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Keith Still, Marina Papalexi, Yiyi Fan and David Bamford

This paper aims to explore the development and application of place crowd safety management tools for areas of public assembly and major events, from a practitioner perspective.

12482

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the development and application of place crowd safety management tools for areas of public assembly and major events, from a practitioner perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The crowd safety risk assessment model is known as design, information, management-ingress, circulation, egress (DIM-ICE) (Still, 2009) is implemented to optimise crowd safety and potentially throughput. Three contrasting case studies represent examples of some of the world’s largest and most challenging crowd safety projects.

Findings

The paper provides some insight into how the DIM-ICE model can be used to aid strategic planning at major events, assess potential crowd risks and to avoid potential crowd safety issues.

Practical implications

It provides further clarity to what effective place management practice is. Evidence-based on the case studies demonstrates that the application of the DIM-ICE model is useful for recognising potential place crowd safety issues and identifying areas for require improvement.

Originality/value

Crowd science is an emerging field of research, which is primarily motivated by place crowd safety issues in congested places; the application and reporting of an evidence-based model (i.e. DIM-ICE model) add to this. The paper addresses a research gap related to the implementation of analytic tools in characterising place crowd dynamics.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

David Bamford, Katy Rothwell, Pippa Tyrrell and Ruth Boaden

This paper aims to report on the approach to change used in the development of a tool to assess patient status six months after stroke (the Greater Manchester Stroke Assessment…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the approach to change used in the development of a tool to assess patient status six months after stroke (the Greater Manchester Stroke Assessment Tool: GM-SAT).

Design/methodology/approach

The overall approach to change is based on the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARiHS) Framework, which involves extensive stakeholder engagement before implementation. A key feature was the use of a facilitator without previous clinical experience.

Findings

The active process of change involved a range of stakeholders – commissioners, patients and professionals – as well as review of published research evidence. The result of this process was the creation of the GM-SAT.

Practical implications

The details of the decision processes within the tool included a range of perspectives; the process of localisation led commissioners to identify gaps in care provision as well as learning from others in terms of how services might be provided and organised. The facilitator role was key at all stages in bringing together the wide range of perspectives; the relatively neutral perceived status of the facilitator enabled resistance to change to be minimised.

Social implications

The output of this project, the GM-SAT, has the potential to significantly improve patients' physical, psychological and social outcomes and optimise their quality of life. This will be explored further in future phases of work.

Originality/value

A structured process of change which included multiple stakeholder involvement throughout, localisation of approaches and a dedicated independent facilitator role was effective in achieving the development of a useful tool (GM-SAT).

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2023

M. Claudia tom Dieck, Eleanor Cranmer, Alexandre Luis Prim and David Bamford

Augmented reality (AR) is transforming the business and interactive marketing landscape. This research aims to investigate consumers' degree of involvement and if a feeling of…

Abstract

Purpose

Augmented reality (AR) is transforming the business and interactive marketing landscape. This research aims to investigate consumers' degree of involvement and if a feeling of immersion and presence influences AR shopping satisfaction, comparing high- and low-immersive AR experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a quantitative approach. Two studies were carried out: a high-immersive AR experiment with 173 participants and a low-immersive AR experience with 222 participants. Findings were analyzed using partial least square structural equation modeling with SmartPLS.

Findings

Results indicate the antecedents of immersion and presence differ when it comes to different immersive AR levels. In a high-immersive AR experience, flow, information seeking and novelty are attributes related to immersion, while enjoyment and personalization are related to presence. Contrastingly, in a low-immersive AR experience, only flow is related to immersion, while information seeking, novelty and personalization are related to presence. These results highlight the role of immersion and presence as mediators for AR shopping satisfaction experience.

Originality/value

This study's originality lies in the use of a rival model for analysis. Findings suggest a contingent perspective of AR experience, depending on high- or low-immersion experience, so companies must pay attention for how to measure AR experiences to increase involvement and satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

1 – 10 of 182