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Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Kay Sidebottom and David Ball

Further Education in England today is over-regulated, over-inspected, and has suffered from an increasingly interventionist government agenda. Trainee teachers entering…

Abstract

Further Education in England today is over-regulated, over-inspected, and has suffered from an increasingly interventionist government agenda. Trainee teachers entering the sector are required to undertake regular reflective work, traditionally in the form of a written journal. However, where trainees use creative methods for reflection, such as stories, films, drawings, photography, and models, greater “reflexivity” and connection of theory to practice become apparent. This led me, as a teacher-educator, to inquire further into our practice, examining the impact that creative reflective expression might have on the teachers themselves, their resilience, and their ability to subvert the oppressions of the current education system. Drawing on a collaborative inquiry between myself as teacher-educator, and student/colleague David Ball, this chapter recounts the story of a year of experimentation through the coming together of a student-teacher artistic assemblage which pushed the boundaries of our teacher training curriculum and formal notions of “research”. We found that we moved in new configurations of “teacher-artist”, “student-curator”, and “audience-class” towards a notion of ourselves of “cosmic artisans” (Delueuze and Guattari, 1987) to share with the world our painful, emergent and embodied experiences of “becoming teacher”.

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Decentering the Researcher in Intimate Scholarship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-636-3

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

David Ball

This paper is a thought experiment that investigates the possibilities of moving from the typical “just-in-case” model of managing legacy collections of printed monographs…

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152

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a thought experiment that investigates the possibilities of moving from the typical “just-in-case” model of managing legacy collections of printed monographs to a centralised “just-in-time” model.

Design/methodology/approach

Reliable published statistical data have been used; the core of these are the annual library statistics for UK research libraries collected by SCONUL. From these and other sources, the costs of monograph storage across UK research libraries have been determined.

Findings

Establishing a centralised collective collection would bring a large return on investment.

Research limitations/implications

This is not an empirical study.

Originality/value

The value of this study is high.

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The Bottom Line, vol. 28 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

David Ball

A study, funded by Resource: The Council for Museums, Archives and Libraries, was undertaken in 2000‐2001 to give an up‐to‐date view of the current experience of…

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2465

Abstract

A study, funded by Resource: The Council for Museums, Archives and Libraries, was undertaken in 2000‐2001 to give an up‐to‐date view of the current experience of outsourcing and externalization in libraries, museums and archives. Case studies of purchasers recognized as pioneers in the field, and of providers, were undertaken. As a result, this weighted decision matrix was developed as a tool for judging the suitability of library services for outsourcing. Illustrations of potential uses are given.

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The Bottom Line, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Jo Pye and David Ball

In recent years libraries worldwide have been affected by an uncertain financial environment in which resource buying has been restricted, causing them to look at ways of…

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1117

Abstract

In recent years libraries worldwide have been affected by an uncertain financial environment in which resource buying has been restricted, causing them to look at ways of extending their purchasing capabilities to compensate for reduced budgets. In the UK, the British Library Research & Innovation Centre (BLRIC) has recently awarded a grant to Bournemouth University Library & Information Services to investigate the activities of library purchasing consortia in four types of library: higher education, further education, public and health libraries. The project remit also includes a study of library suppliers in the deregulated marketplace following the abolition of the UK Net Book Agreement in autumn 1995. This paper charts the progress of the research that has identified a number of LIS consortia, focuses on the context that has encouraged their formation and presents early findings that illuminate cooperative purchasing activities.

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The Bottom Line, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

David Ball

This paper embodies research on the purchasing of electronic resources by public libraries. It sought to identify what works well and what is problematic with respect to…

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1728

Abstract

This paper embodies research on the purchasing of electronic resources by public libraries. It sought to identify what works well and what is problematic with respect to the management of commercial products. Views were also sought on future development, and how procurement could best be managed. The main concerns identified were the lack of a national dimension and strategy, and of expertise in individual authorities and consortia, particularly with licences. Purchasers were felt to be reactive, not taking control of the procurement by specifying requirements. E‐resources were felt to be very expensive; there was not necessarily any price advantage as a result of consortial negotiations. It was also felt that hard‐copy and e‐resource procurement and strategy should not be separated. Licence terms and pricing models were felt to be confusing, and the interfaces provided inappropriate.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Book part
Publication date: 29 September 2015

Andrew Morrison

This chapter discusses how Nancy Fraser’s theory of two-dimensional participatory justice may be employed in research concerned with inequalities within higher education…

Abstract

This chapter discusses how Nancy Fraser’s theory of two-dimensional participatory justice may be employed in research concerned with inequalities within higher education. The main concepts of Fraser’s theory are discussed and evaluated in the light of the critical attention they have attracted. Following that, I demonstrate the empirical application of Fraser’s ideas through discussion of extracts of data from a recent small-scale investigation undertaken within a UK-based higher education institution. Finally, I conclude by discussing the strengths of Fraser’s concepts with some indications for future research.

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Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-287-0

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Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Samuel Dent

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Recognising Students who Care for Children while Studying
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-672-6

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Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Yang Lor

Research demonstrates that social class affects where high-achieving students apply to college, but the processes through which such effects come about are not well…

Abstract

Research demonstrates that social class affects where high-achieving students apply to college, but the processes through which such effects come about are not well understood. This chapter draws on 46 in-depth interviews with high-achieving students in the Bay Area to examine how social class impacts college application decisions. I argue that the upbringing and experiences associated with students’ social class shape their narratives regarding how much autonomy or constraints they perceive in making college decisions. Higher-SES students present a narrative of independence about what they have done to prepare themselves for college and where to apply. In contrast, lower-SES students speak of experiences and considerations that reflect a narrative of interdependence between themselves and their parents that is grounded in the mutual concern they have for one another as the prospect of college looms. As a result, higher-SES students frame college as an opportunity to leave their families and immerse themselves in an environment far from home while lower-SES students understand college as a continuation of family interdependence. Consequently, higher-SES students are more likely to apply to selective private universities in other parts of the country, while lower-SES students tend to limit their choices to primarily selective and nonselective public colleges closer to home. This research enhances our understanding of the mechanisms by which social class differences in family experiences contribute to the perpetuation of social inequality.

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Research in the Sociology of Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-077-6

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2018

Susan Whittaker

Differences between UK countries in HE policy and provision concerning the accessibility of HE study for students, and the costs of that study, have implications for…

Abstract

Differences between UK countries in HE policy and provision concerning the accessibility of HE study for students, and the costs of that study, have implications for cross-border study mobility. Those qualified for and wishing to enter HE are affected both by financial support for students and the provision of the HE service in terms of the number of places and the shape and history of the sector within their home country, and in comparison to other countries of the UK. In addition, funding policies for mobile students do not recognise social diversity and so have an unequal impact on students in relation to their socio-economic resources, a consequence of the territorial frame of reference and unequal devolution arrangements which work against a UK-wide social citizenship. Drawing on a quantitative analysis of student data, this chapter discusses the unequal conditions of access, opportunity and financial support for HE across the UK and how this may have a negative impact on the role of cross-border mobility in widening participation.

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Higher Education Funding and Access in International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-651-6

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Abstract

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Recognising Students who Care for Children while Studying
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-672-6

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